Author Topic: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky  (Read 30221 times)

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« on: 11/24/2012 06:12 PM »
Arrow cross the sky, falcon wild
Searching from high, falcon wild
Spread your wings and fly,
Lord of winds arrow cross the sky
Falcon wild, spread your wings and fly...

Born of joy and light, falcon wild
Majesty in flight, falcon wild
Grant me falcon sight,
Lord of wings arrow cross the sky
Falcon wild, spread your wings and fly...


Anna Kristina, “Falcon Wild”
« Last Edit: 11/24/2012 06:12 PM by Ares67 »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #1 on: 11/24/2012 06:14 PM »
Discovery soars like a falcon

The STS-33 insignia, designed by the five-member crew, features a stylized falcon soaring into space to represent America’s commitment to manned spaceflight. “The crewmembers feel the falcon symbolized courage, intelligence, tenacity and love of flight,” a NASA statement said when the patch was unveiled. “They intend the orbit around Earth to represent the falcon’s lofty domain; however, the bird, with its keen vision and natural curiosity, is depicted looking forward beyond that domain to challenge the edge of the universe.”

The bold red feathers of the falcon’s wings drawn from the American flag overlaying the random field of stars illustrate the determination to expand the boundaries of knowledge by American presence in space. The single gold star on a field of blue honors the memory of the late Rear Admiral Stanley David Griggs, originally assigned to this crew. (Description on STS-33 decal and Countdown, December 1989 – edited)

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #2 on: 11/24/2012 06:18 PM »
Discover Discovery’s Crew

Frederick Drew Gregory, Commander – Col. USAF, was born January 7, 1941, in Washington D.C. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1964 and a Master’s degree in Information Systems from George Washington University in 1977. Gregory entered the Air Force in 1964 for pilot training and received his wings from undergraduate helicopter training in 1965. After three years of flying helicopters he was then re-trained as a fighter pilot and flew the F-4 Phantom. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in 1970 and was subsequently assigned as a research/engineering test pilot for the Air Force from 1971 to 1974 and for NASA from 1974 to 1978. Gregory has flown more than 40 different types of single and mufti-engine fixed and rotary wing military and civilian aircraft including gliders. He has logged over 5,600 hours of flight time. In January 1978 he was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA and flew his first mission aboard Challenger STS 51-B, launched on April 29,1985, gaining 168 hours of spaceflight time. After Challenger, Frederick Gregory served as chief of the operational safety branch at NASA Headquarters.

John Elmer Blaha, Pilot– Col. USAF, was born August 26, 1942, in San Antonio, Texas. He received a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science from the United States Air Force Academy in 1965 and a Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University in 1966. In 1967 he received his pilot wings at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona, and was subsequently assigned as an operational pilot flying A-37, F-4, F-102 and F-106 aircraft (completing 361 combat missions in Vietnam). Blaha attended the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1971, and piloted the NF-104 research aircraft to 104,400 feet. Following graduation he served as an F-104 instructor pilot at the test pilot school. In 1973 John Blaha was assigned a test pilot working with the Royal Air Force at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, Boscombe Down, United Kingdom. During his 3-year tour, he flew stability/control, performance, spin and weapons delivery flight tests in Jaguar, Buccaneer, Hawk and Jet Provost aircraft.

Blaha was selected as astronaut candidate by NASA in May 1980 and served as ascent, orbit, planning and entry CapCom in the Mission Control Center for seven shuttle flights. Having just gained over 119 hours in space during his first shuttle mission as pilot aboard Discovery STS-29 in March 1989, Blaha will achieve something rare for an astronaut, especially in the post-Challenger age. He will be making his second flight this year. He replaces USNR Rear Admiral S. David Griggs, who was killed on June 17, 1989, when the private plane he was flying crashed in eastern Arkansas. Blaha had previously been assigned as the pilot for STS-40, a space and life sciences dedicated mission (SLS-1).

Replacing Blaha as pilot for STS-40 is USAF Maj. Sidney M. Gutierrez. Set for launch in August, 1990, the 7-day flight will feature space and life sciences studies in the SLS-1 laboratory module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Gutierrez joins Crew Commander USMC Col. Bryan D. O'Connor, Mission Specialists M. Rhea Seddon, M.D., James P. Bagian, M.D., and Tamara E. Jernigan, Ph.D., and Payload Specialists F. Drew Gaffney, Ph.D., and Robert W. Phillips, Ph.D. All had been previously named.

“In my view all missions really are 99 percent the same, and there’s 1 percent that’s different. So to me it (STS-33) wasn’t significantly different (to STS-29), even though it was classified and was Department of Defense. I don’t know if that makes any sense, but that’s true,” explained John Blaha later. “I’m trying to think of a good analogy. If every crew person could do that, they would get on a ramp, because you’ve just flown, and when you land from any Space Shuttle mission, there are no more trained astronauts than the people who have just landed.  If they turned right around and flew, assigned to another mission with a different on-orbit task, I’ve always said I think you could have about a month and a half of training, and they could launch. Because the ascent and entry consume so much of the training that you’re way up on a stump, and so a few little proficiencies of ascent and entry, and that’s how you could do that. So, anyway, I thought maybe it’s a better, more efficient way to fly around here. Have about five crews, and you just keep turning them. But anyway, there’s obviously other purposes going on.”

Franklin Story Musgrave, Mission Specialist – M.D., was born August 19, 1935, in Boston, Massachusetts. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and statistics from Syracuse University in 1958, a Master of Business administration degree in operational analysis and computer programming from the UCLA in 1959, a Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry from Marietta College in 1960, a doctorate of medicine from Columbia University in 1964, and a Master of Science in physiology and biophysics from the University of Kentucky in 1966. Musgrave, who was one of eleven scientists added to NASA’s astronaut corps in August 1967, has flown 150 different types of civilian and military aircraft, logging over 15,700 hours flying time. He worked on the design and development of the Skylab program and participated in the design and development of all Space Shuttle extravehicular activity elements, including spacesuits and the Manned Maneuvering Units. During his first spaceflight Musgrave served as Mission Specialist on STS-6, the maiden voyage of Challenger. He was Mission Specialist on the Spacelab 2 mission (STS 51-F), which launched aboard Challenger on July 29, 1985. He has accumulated a total of over 311 hours in space.

Kathryn Cordell Ryan “K.T.” Thornton, Mission Specialist– Ph.D., was born August 17, 1952, in Montgomery, Alabama. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Auburn University in 1974, a Master of Science degree in physics from the University of Virginia in 1977 and a doctorate in 1979. Thornton participated in the nuclear physics research programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National laboratory, Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, and the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. Her work included statistical analyses of heavy-ion nuclear reactions and light-ion production from bombardment of various nuclei with high-energy ion beams. Thornton was awarded a NATO postdoctoral fellowship to continue her research at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, West Germany and in 1980 was employed as a physicist at the U.S. Army Foreign Science and Technology Center in Virginia. Having been selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in May 1984, Kathryn Thornton will make another “first” for STS-33, becoming the first woman to fly on a secret military mission.

Manley Lanier “Sonny” Carter, Jr., Mission Specialist – M.D., was born August 15, 1947, in Macon, Georgia. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry from Emory University in 1973, entered the U.S. Navy in 1974 and completed flight surgeon school in Pensacola, Florida. Carter was assigned as the senior medical officer of USS Forrestal and in March 1979 completed F-4 training at VMFAT-101 Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Arizona. In 1981 he made a 9-month Mediterranean cruise aboard USS Forrestal with VMFA-115 and attended the U.S. Navy Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun) the following year. In 1984 Carter had just graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School when he was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA. He has logged 2,100 flying hours and 160 carrier landings in jet aircraft.

In “Who’s Who in Space” Michael Cassutt describes Carter’s first assignments at NASA after qualifying as Mission Specialist in June 1985. “He was immediately assigned to the crew of Mission 61-I, then scheduled for launch in the summer of 1986. While training for that mission he served with the astronaut support team at the Kennedy Space Center, setting up cockpit switches and assisting astronauts in boarding the shuttle orbiter prior to the launch. He was the last person to see the crew of the Challenger alive. For much of 1986 he was involved in the search for Challenger debris, including recovery of the crew cabin. He later worked on the development of a crew escape system, and as the astronaut office’s EVA representative.”

According to Michael Cassutt, while Manley Carter attended medical school he “played soccer for the Atlanta Chiefs of the North American Soccer League, making him the first ex-professional athlete to go into space.” So, it’s no wonder why some of the published STS-33 onboard crew photos showed astronauts playing with a fluffy “soccer ball.” And remember, at the time the U.S., not really a nation of soccer fans, was preparing to host the 1994 Football (Soccer) FIFA World Cup, spanning nine cities from coast to coast…

“Manley,” what a name for an athlete and an astronaut! And in addition to that, Countdown magazine called “Sonny” “Billy Bob” Carter “a record holder for nicknames in space.”  :)
« Last Edit: 11/24/2012 06:23 PM by Ares67 »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #3 on: 11/24/2012 06:20 PM »
“The crew was a very homogeneous crew, and I got absorbed into it pretty quickly,” remembered STS-33 pilot John Blaha. “I thought Fred Gregory was – I’m going to call him a real good commander, because he was a commander who would give responsibility and authority to the other four people and sit back and watch them perform. He wasn’t sort of looking over your shoulder. So in training he let you make mistakes, and then he just wanted you to be ready for the mission. Personally, I liked that leadership style, myself, so that worked real well. He was very strong, I thought, as a leader. I’m going to tell you some funny stories, maybe, here in the history on the other side of it, but as a leader I’d say that’s his strength. Of course, Story is a very qualified guy, who performed a lot of good work for the crew, and I thought K. T. – this was her first mission at the time, but really a good crew person and you could rely on her to do what she needed to do. Sonny Carter was just outstanding. On the trips we would fly with as a crew, he was funny, because in his head were the names of songs and singers, and he was always talking about really great artists who sing well and write good music, and then he’d always be talking about movies, too, and actors. Anyway, he was a good person to talk about those kinds of things, as well as a very good crew person.” (Countdown, December 1989, NASA News Release No. 89-040, June 29, 1989, Michael Cassutt, “Who’s Who in Space – ISS Edition,” 1999, and Rebecca Wright’s Aug. 18, 2006, JSC Oral History Project interview with John Blaha – edited)

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #4 on: 11/24/2012 06:25 PM »
STS-33 will fly in secrecy

No person should have qualms about removing the appendix from their body – it’s an useless organ, serving no function in human physiology. So why does the Air Force, the question goes, insist on not letting a word out about the payload inside shuttle Discovery?

The question is intelligent enough. But it is not receiving any intelligent answer. Again with Discovery STS-33, the military is maintaining its blank face – even though the Soviets do not need to hear the military speak in order to know what is aboard the mission. Military budgets/testimony to Congress indicates that the mission will utilize an Inertial Upper Stage. Only one payload in the near term needs the IUS – a “Magnum” spy satellite. The Soviets will have their eyes open for “Magnum.”

The military’s “hush-hush” shuttle dates pre-Challenger, when they planned extensive use of the shuttle. At that time, the Department of Defense desired to establish a precedence of secrecy more as insurance for future projects than needs at the time. The aftermath of Challenger, however, has seen the military abandon its ambitious shuttle flights. The last one is scheduled to be launched June 1991. So why is the government clinging to this outdated policy?

The Air Force defends its no-comment policy with the rationale that the Soviets would be unable to get an accurate fix on the trajectory if no launch time were announced. The military normally gives a three-to-four-hour launch window and announces the exact time only nine minutes before lift-off. Many space watchers agree that some secrecy is desirable, but they say that too much silence is neither necessary nor effective. Jeffrey T. Richelson, author of “The U.S. Intelligence Community.” Says, “To say that the U.S. will not divulge the exact time during its four-hour launch window is to say that the Soviets cannot stay awake for a four-hour stretch.”

The Air Force’s attempts to shroud in secrecy its military space missions has generated widespread criticism in the civilian circles. “The cloak of secrecy is counterproductive,” says Paul B. Stares, a researcher at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. “It draws attention to the launch.” Stares says that the press would lose interest in the missions if bland statements were routinely given concerning the launch dates, time and general orbit of a satellite. Some critics claim that the government secrecy is to hide from the public how the money is spent on costs of the satellites and the missions. “For the military, using the shuttle is like taking a Rolls Royce to deliver the Hope diamond,” says John E. Pike, head of space policy for the Washington-based Federation of American Scientists.

DOD’s discretion in divulging flight and cargo information can be explained by the crucial role satellites play in modern military operations. They can be used for monitoring arms agreements, relaying device and data transmission, gathering photographic intelligence and detecting enemy missile launches. Pike says that the Soviets will know exactly what is aboard the shuttle within hours of launch, and the only people who will not know are the American people. As usual, speculation abounds on what will be inside Discovery’s payload bay. Pike has said he believes Discovery will carry two military communications satellites. Recently released Air Force budget documents, however, point to the IUS and the “Magnum.”

“Magnum” is categorized as a Signals Intelligence Satellite, which eavesdrops on Soviet communications from geostationary orbit over the U.S.S.R.  The satellite, costing $300-million, weighs about 5,000 pounds and sports a large antenna for picking up signals. “Magnum” received much publicity as the cargo of the first military flight, STS 51-C, launched aboard Discovery in January 1985. Brigadier General Richard Abel, the director of public affairs at the Air Force, warned the press in advance that any guessing game about the nature of Discovery’s mission and cargo would violate national security. Despite warnings, The Washington Post ran a front-page story saying that aboard the flight will be a “military intelligence satellite that is to collect electronic signals and retransmit them to a U.S. receiving station on Earth.” The newspaper was denounced by the then Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and General Abel was reassigned. Weinberger went so far as to hint treason, saying that the article gave “aid and comfort” to the enemy.

STS-33 will follow the pattern of previous IUS missions, with the satellite deployment coming about ten hours into the mission. The typical military shuttle flight lasts only four days. The public will learn of the landing time 24 hours before the event – unless, perhaps, they call the Soviet President Gorbachev. With the Soviet’s new openness, he might release the information! (Countdown, December 1989 – edited)

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #5 on: 11/24/2012 06:27 PM »
Discovery to deploy a secret military satellite

The cargo on this mission will weigh 45,735 pounds, which includes the 32,500-pound IUS and its 7,249-pound tilt table, which will remain on board for return at the end of the scheduled four-day mission. Weight of the space vehicle that will be put into geosynchronous orbit by the IUS is 5,985 pounds. The signal-gathering payload is identical to the first Defense Department Space Shuttle Payload that was launched as Mission 51-C on January 24, 1985. The spacecraft will be operated by the National Security Agency. The satellite is designed to ferret out voice, telemetry and other broadcast signals from Soviet military installations.

If the countdown proceeds according to the plan that was applicable last week, the launch team will be called to stations at 4 p.m. November 17. The countdown will be the standard 43 hours, with two eight-hour built-in holds, a 12-hour-55-minute hold and a one-hour hold. The launch period for the flight, called STS-33, lasts four hours and will begin at 6:30 p.m. EST. The launch window is 70 minutes long. The orbiter will be placed into a 110 x 280-nautical-mile orbit at a launch azimuth of 28.45 degrees. There will be thee orbital maneuvering system burns, the last on the fourth orbit. The spacecraft will be deployed on the seventh orbit, and the IUS will be ignited as the Discovery crew is on the ascending node of the eighth orbit. Mission duration is a nominal four days, two hours, 13 minutes. The mission plan calls for deorbit on the 64th orbit, which would mean a landing at Edwards Air Force Base as nightfall approaches. (Aviation Week & Space Technology, Nov. 6, 1989 – edited)


Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #6 on: 11/24/2012 06:31 PM »
Launch Preparations

Upon returning from STS-29, Discovery was placed inside OPF-2. In the beginning of April 1989, technicians off-loaded hypergolic propellants and began structural post-flight inspections and window polishing. In mid-April a test of the power reactant storage and distribution system took place, as well as tile waterproofing, ferry plug removal and heat shield inspection. By month’s end the left OMS pod was removed to work on the “clamshell” repair made prior to STS-26. By mid-May, Discovery was readied for the temporary move to the OMRF; the Ku-band antenna was stowed and the payload bay doors were closed, so OV-103 could make room for Atlantis after her return to KSC from STS-30 on May 15.

Power down work continued through May, including hooking up the orbiter’s environmental control system to ground systems and erecting access stands around the vehicle. During the week of June 7, power down work included modification of the crew seats to allow more room for the crew when they wear the partial pressure suits. By mid-June technicians worked on wiring and instrumentation improvements. Chief among the modifications was the transfer of the Rate-Gyro Assemblies from the Solid Rocket Boosters to beneath the thermal-blanketing “liner” in the orbiter’s payload bay. This modification would allow the RGAs to be reused after each mission, instead of being expended following recovery of the boosters from the Atlantic Ocean. Discovery left the OMRF for OPF-1 at 1:00 p.m. on July 11. Power up and payload bay door opening was begun July 17.

The next day operations to configure the payload bay for STS-33 commenced. The left-hand radiators were deployed to allow installation of thermal control blankets July 19. A day later, the communications system was checked out and the power reactant storage and distribution system testing continued. On July 27, a two-day voltage test of the fuel cells began and a functional check of the FRCS continued. By July 31 ammonia servicing was completed. Power up operations and systems testing were continuing on August 1 and filling and bleeding of the hydraulic system was underway the next day.

Systems testing continued during the first part of August, including the Ku-Band antenna and leak checks. Modifications and tile work also were underway. The main landing gear brakes were installed by August 10. Preparations for installation of the main landing gear tires were begun on August 14, and three of four wheel assemblies were installed by August 17. By mid-August Mobile Launch Platform 2 had been rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building, cleaned and partially reprocessed following Columbia’s STS-28 launch on August 8. Now the Solid Rocket Booster stacking sequence for mission STS-33 was to commence. Upon completion of the boosters ET-38/LWT-31 would be attached.

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #7 on: 11/24/2012 06:33 PM »
A new main engine, #2107, was installed in the number three position on August 18. The number one main engine, #2011 (previously flown on STS-9, 51-J and 61-B) followed the next day. The right-hand OMS pod (RP-01, recently used aboard Atlantis STS-27 and 30) and two of three Auxiliary Power Units were in place by August 22. Prior missions using RP-01 included the first five Challenger flights, as well as Atlantis STS 51-J and 61-B.  The number two main engine was installed on August 30. Used once before, engine #2031 had boosted Discovery during the launch of STS-29.

A landing gear test was conducted on September 5. On the same day, the left-hand OMS pod was transferred from the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility to the OPF and was installed on September 6. The LP-04 pod had been used on five earlier missions – STS 51-G, 51-I, 61-C, STS-26 and 29. Leak checks of Discovery’s main propulsion system were underway September 8, followed by tests of the orbiter’s radiators on September 11. Equipment interface tests with the STS-33 crew were made on September 16-17, with the crew becoming familiar with the orbiter’s cabin. Regulators on the propulsion system were being installed on September 18. Meanwhile electrical redundancy testing of the OMS and RCS systems was conducted. The Ku-band antenna underwent testing on September 20. Final cycling tests of the aero surfaces and a brake anti-skid test were conducted during the week of September 25. The next day, technicians began cleanup operations in preparation for the closing of the payload bay doors. Pressurization tests of the main propulsion system followed on September 28. (Florida Today, Oct. 22, 1989, Countdown, June through November 1989, Spaceflight News, September 1989 and September 1990 – edited)

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #8 on: 11/24/2012 06:37 PM »
Crew Training

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #9 on: 11/24/2012 06:41 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #10 on: 11/24/2012 06:44 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #11 on: 11/24/2012 06:46 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #12 on: 11/24/2012 06:49 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #13 on: 11/24/2012 06:57 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #14 on: 11/24/2012 07:00 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #15 on: 11/24/2012 07:03 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #16 on: 11/24/2012 07:10 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #17 on: 11/24/2012 07:16 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #18 on: 11/24/2012 07:21 PM »

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #19 on: 11/24/2012 07:27 PM »

Tags: