Author Topic: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops  (Read 40131 times)

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #40 on: 01/04/2012 08:48 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #41 on: 01/04/2012 08:51 PM »
PAO: Houston controlling now. All main engines running at 100 percent. Roll program initiated, a 120 degree roll maneuver to put the ship on its 57 degree inclination, with the crew heads down and wings level… throttling down to 92 percent. Main engines running smoothly, throttling down now to 65 percent. Challenger going through the period of max-Q of maximum dynamic pressure on the ship… Engine performance still stable, APUs all running smoothly… Velocity…

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #42 on: 01/04/2012 08:55 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #43 on: 01/04/2012 08:59 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #44 on: 01/04/2012 09:03 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #45 on: 01/04/2012 09:05 PM »
CapCom (John Blaha): Challenger, Houston, go at throttle up.

Crippen: Roger, John, go at throttle up.

PAO: All main engines back up at 100 percent of thrust, velocity 2,000… 3,000 feet per second now, altitude 11 miles, distance downrange 8 miles… Challenger climbing at a rate of 1,800 feet per second. Engine performance still looks good, all engines are running at 100 percent of rated thrust, APU performance is nominal… velocity 4,200 feet… Altitude 18 miles… 19 miles, velocity 4,800 feet per second, distance downrange 20 nautical miles.

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #46 on: 01/04/2012 09:08 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #47 on: 01/04/2012 09:11 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #48 on: 01/04/2012 09:14 PM »
Crippen: Pc less than 50.

PAO: That call precursor to SRB separation which should come momentarily…

Crippen: And we have a SRB sep.

CapCom: Roger, separation.

PAO: And nominal separation… all three engines still running.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, first stage performance nominal.

Crippen: Roger, nominal first stage.

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #49 on: 01/04/2012 09:17 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #50 on: 01/04/2012 09:21 PM »
The retrieval operation for mission 41-G's solid rocket boosters was one of the smoothest and fastest ever, according to Anker Rasmussen, manager of Marine Operations for Morton Thiokol. "This has to be one of our three fastest operations to date. We don't keep precise records on past times, but when you consider the northern launch inclination (most shuttle missions are launched in a more eastern direction), this was a great time."

Following separation of the SRBs, just over two minutes into the mission, they parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean approximately 140 miles due east of Jacksonville, Florida. "It took us about half an hour to reach the SRBs," Rasmussen said. "We were about seven miles from one and nine miles from the other .... From the time we began work on the SRBs until we had them in tow was about four hours."

The Freedom Star and Liberty Star entered Port Canaveral just before sunrise, at 6:40 a.m. EDT, on October 6. Arrival was timed so that it would take place with benefit of daylight. "We had to keep our speed down so that we wouldn't get there before the sun came up," Rasmussen stated. "We returned to Hangar AF (at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station) seven hours earlier than I had originally expected."

[STAR GAZER, p. 1, Oct. 18, 1984.]

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #51 on: 01/04/2012 09:25 PM »
This is what the Oct. 6, 1984, issue of “Today” had to say about the launch:

Challenger's launch at 7:03 a.m. EDT from KSC's pad 39A was visible in Jacksonville in the north and Miami to the south. Some people on the Space Coast saw the shuttle's twin solid rocket boosters drop from 44 miles up. "All in all, we feel very good. And we think probably this is a harbinger for the future on how well things can go," said shuttle management director Tom Utsman. "Things went very smoothly, especially compared with the last one," said launch director Bob Sieck, referring to the trouble-plagued inaugural launch of shuttle Discovery. "We think we're off and running on our progress toward once a month launches."

Among those witnessing Challenger's liftoff was tennis player Billie Jean King, who was invited by astronaut Sally Ride - America's first woman in space, who embarked on her second voyage. Judy Resnik, America's second female space traveler, was also on hand. Others gathered in the predawn air were Canadian Minister of Science and Technology Thomas E. Siddon; Sir Godfrey and Landy Nancy Agnew of London; Ambassador and Mrs. Allen E. Gotlieb of Canada; Col. Gilbert Raye of the National Security Council; and U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, D-W.Va.

Canada's newly named Minister of Science and Technology, reflecting the conservative tone of the country's recently elected Tory government, called for increased cooperation between Canada and the United States in the space program. "I think we've always been able to get along in a cooperative way," said Minister Tom Siddon during an impromptu news conference at KSC. "We have to trust our neighbors a little bit more." But Siddon, at KSC to see off Marc Garneau, the first Canadian to go into space, noted that Canada continues to advocate "the peaceful uses of space." Siddon wouldn't predict the level of future funding for Canada's small, 25-year-old space program. "Today is a day for celebration," said Siddon in regard to Garneau's historic ride on the space.
« Last Edit: 01/04/2012 09:27 PM by Ares67 »

Offline npuentes

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #52 on: 01/05/2012 12:17 PM »

When NASA announced its plans for Mission 41-G, one remarkable task on the agenda was a spacewalk by Kathy Sullivan - which would have made her the first woman to do so.

But the Russians had other plans: For the first time since 1963 they launched a woman into space aboard Soyuz T-12 on July 17, 1984. And guess what: On July 25, 1984, Svetlana Savitskaya (35) left the Salyut 7 space station for nearly four hours - becoming the first female spacewalker in history.

The Cold War at its best...  ::)

Note quite true. Savitskaya first launched on Soyuz T-7 in 1982. The Soviets therefore got a political double shot with T-12: The first woman to fly twice (before Ride) and the first to do an EVA (before Sullivan)

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #53 on: 01/05/2012 03:12 PM »

Note quite true. Savitskaya first launched on Soyuz T-7 in 1982. The Soviets therefore got a political double shot with T-12: The first woman to fly twice (before Ride) and the first to do an EVA (before Sullivan)

Oops! You're right. :-[  Thank you for your additional information. ;D
« Last Edit: 01/05/2012 03:13 PM by Ares67 »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #54 on: 01/05/2012 03:15 PM »
After a flawless launch the release of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, which was to study the amount of solar radiation reaching Earth and being absorbed by its different regions, had to be delayed. The hinges on the satellite’s solar arrays had frozen shut. ERBS had to be put into direct sunlight in order to warm it up. Sally Ride then shook the RMS and the arrays came free. Two hours and 50 minutes late, the ERBS was released.

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #55 on: 01/05/2012 03:18 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #56 on: 01/05/2012 03:22 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #57 on: 01/05/2012 03:26 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #58 on: 01/05/2012 03:31 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS 41-G - Earth Watching and Refueling Stops
« Reply #59 on: 01/05/2012 03:36 PM »

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