Author Topic: Spaceflight Book Thread  (Read 115873 times)

Offline Star One

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #380 on: 02/04/2016 09:23 PM »

....for a space geek like myself?  I've seen bunches of books on Amazon but.....there's so many to choose from!!

Give me some ideas of great reading regarding space or the space shuttles, please?


Tell me about it. I have a fair old number related pre-orders for 2016.

Online whitelancer64

Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #381 on: 02/04/2016 09:31 PM »
NASA's History Office currently has several free (you still pay shipping) books available.

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/hqlibrary/ic/ic2.htm

I highly recommend "Challenge to Apollo" by Asif Siddiqui. It's packed with very solidly referenced history, but is very readable.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline WindyCity

Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #382 on: 04/04/2016 09:56 PM »
I just finished reading a short new book that might be of interest to the nasaspaceflight community. It's called SpaceX from the Ground Up by Chris Prophet and Andrew Cowley. I found it interesting. The authors have culled information from a wide variety of sources (fully documented). I'd like to hear what folks think about it. Prophet self-published on amazon.com. The book's available only in Kindle and Kindle eBook formats, which might be a problem for some. It has some terrific graphics and is entertaining from that perspective alone. You'll find it highly speculative, but it's not sci-fi. It's not particularly technical, but there's enough red meat, I think, for nasaspaceflight STEM types. Many of the sources are from popular articles, website posts, and other books on the company—therefore, their reliability is suspect. Nevertheless…

SpaceX from the Ground Up
by Chris Prophet and Andrew Cowley
http://tiny.cc/plsjay
Kindle, Kindle ebook
« Last Edit: 04/05/2016 01:27 AM by WindyCity »

Offline Johnnyhinbos

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #383 on: 04/06/2016 09:09 PM »
For a general science fiction book with a solid grounding of hard science that is very well written and incredibly compelling - a series of three so far actually - I can't recommend enough the Fear the Sky series (Fear the Sky, Fear the Survivors, Fear the Future).

As an author of action fiction myself, I am really picky about the details as well as the craft of the writing, and these books have really (really) surprised me. They are based on the well worn and repeatedly used premise of alien invasion, but are told with such a refreshing and compelling voice that it's the only story of this kind that I've enjoyed. And to say "enjoyed" is a giant understatement.

Can you tell that I highly recommend these books? If not, well then - I highly recommend these books!
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Online jgoldader

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #384 on: 04/21/2016 12:30 AM »
Just got my copy of Into the Black by Rowland White, about STS-1.  Flipped through it, and there is a lot about the request to DoD/NRO to image Columbia during the mission when the missing tiles were seen on the OMS pods.  Looks like a good read.
Recovering astronomer

Offline Oersted

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #385 on: 04/21/2016 02:46 PM »
Just got my copy of Into the Black by Rowland White, about STS-1.  Flipped through it, and there is a lot about the request to DoD/NRO to image Columbia during the mission when the missing tiles were seen on the OMS pods.  Looks like a good read.

Finished the book: a good read for space enthusiasts, but probably not for all-knowing STS nerds (they aren't the target audience, anyway). Some notes:

More focused on the astronauts and on the human angle than on the technical development of the STS.

An interesting focus on the NRO. I didn't know they had spy satellites imaging both Skylab and STS-1.

The account of STS-1 is overly dramatised for my liking. "Sword of Damocles hanging over their heads" is the authors' description of a spy satellite pass to image the underside of Columbia, even though it seems most people, including Young and Crippen, were pretty satisfied at that moment that the heat shield wasn't decisively damaged.

I compared the description in this book of Columbia's landing with the one in Young's auto-biography (Forever Young) and this one was much more interesting, well-crafted and engaging.

All in all a good read, if not excellent. His book on the Vulcan bomber attack on the Falklands is still by far his best, a truly cracking read that one.

Offline mtakala24

Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #386 on: 12/05/2016 07:57 PM »
Except for the Hermes book, which has its own thread, any other books this year? I'll let the Santa know...

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #387 on: 12/07/2016 01:21 PM »
Except for the Hermes book, which has its own thread, any other books this year? I'll let the Santa know...

There's this Apollo photo book:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/apollovii-xvii/nasas-apollo-program-vii-xvii

Quote
Alongside a carefully chosen selection out of more than 15,000 photographs from missions VII to XVII, with approximately 25 to 30 pictures per mission, we will start the book with a section where we celebrate the great photographers that these astronauts were and the team behind them who made it all possible. This section will tell you more about what was essentially a crash-course into becoming a photographer in space, rarely getting a second chance to shoot your images.

And British Secret Projects 5: Britain's Space Shuttle:

Quote
British Secret Projects 5: Britain’s Space Shuttle tells the story of how, from 1963 to 1966, English Electric/BAC’s Preston works secretly led the world in re-useable spacecraft design. A huge variety of designs formed the P.42 project and the end result was the ‘Multi-Unit Space Transport And Recovery Device’ (MUSTARD), which pre-dated the Space Shuttle programme by six years and this book offers a unique insight into this hitherto little-known chapter in the secret history of UK space science.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2016 01:21 PM by Hobbes-22 »

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #388 on: 12/12/2016 03:39 PM »

There's this Apollo photo book:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/apollovii-xvii/nasas-apollo-program-vii-xvii

Quote
Alongside a carefully chosen selection out of more than 15,000 photographs from missions VII to XVII, with approximately 25 to 30 pictures per mission, we will start the book with a section where we celebrate the great photographers that these astronauts were and the team behind them who made it all possible. This section will tell you more about what was essentially a crash-course into becoming a photographer in space, rarely getting a second chance to shoot your images.

I just received my copy of this book. It's 320 pages, most of them filled with full-page photos (30x30 cm). Many of those photos were taken on the Moon, but there are also photos of in-flight events (CM-LM docking/undocking, LM descent and ascent, EVA). Some photos were familiar (Earthrise, Armstrong's boot just above a footstep), others were new to me. If you like Apollo photos in high quality and a large format, this is worth a look.

Offline Oersted

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #389 on: 12/17/2016 07:46 PM »
I also received the Apollo photo book: it is absolutely gorgeous and BIG. The photos are huge, lush, printed on high-grade glossy paper, with really dark darks and showing all the details and blemishes of the original negatives. I never realised that the focus was slightly off in many of the Apollo photos (makes sense of course, eyeballing things with chest-mounted Hasselblads) but with the quality of these prints it becomes clear. You really viscerally feel "there", riding along in the capsules and on the Moon. Just splendid. Also very nice article by Walt Cunningham about the photography of Apollo, written specifically for this book. 

Offline mtakala24

Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #390 on: 12/24/2016 08:08 AM »
Dennis Jenkins is finally releasing his long awaited final version of highly regarded Space Shuttle book.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41895.0

Offline JAFO

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #391 on: 12/25/2016 04:15 AM »
May 2017

  Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon Hardcover
https://www.amazon.com/Apollo-Thrilling-Story-First-Mission/dp/1627798323/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1482642148&sr=8-2&keywords=apollo+8   

Anyone can do the job when things are going right. In this business we play for keeps.
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Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #392 on: 12/25/2016 01:59 PM »
It has a great cover.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #393 on: 12/30/2016 01:04 PM »
And British Secret Projects 5: Britain's Space Shuttle:

Quote
British Secret Projects 5: Britain’s Space Shuttle tells the story of how, from 1963 to 1966, English Electric/BAC’s Preston works secretly led the world in re-useable spacecraft design. A huge variety of designs formed the P.42 project and the end result was the ‘Multi-Unit Space Transport And Recovery Device’ (MUSTARD), which pre-dated the Space Shuttle programme by six years and this book offers a unique insight into this hitherto little-known chapter in the secret history of UK space science.

Many thanks for posting this, I received my copy today ;D  It looks fantastic with many illustrations and a great cover by Daniel Uhr (attached). Now to find some time to read it ...

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #394 on: 12/30/2016 03:30 PM »
I have an "uncorrected proof" reviewer's copy of this book. Does anybody have a final copy?

The print in my copy is really small. It's like 10 point or maybe smaller, which makes it difficult to read the book. I saw on CollectSpace that they had a printing problem, but they did not explain what that problem was. I don't want to criticize the book in my review for small print if they fixed that in the final version.

Offline aurora899

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #395 on: 04/02/2017 10:32 AM »
Due to be published in both the UK and the USA in mid-May:

The Last of NASA's Original Pilot Astronauts: Expanding the Space Frontier in the Late Sixties (Springer Praxis Books)
by David J. Shayler (Author), Colin Burgess (Author)

"Resulting from the authors’ deep research into these two pre-Shuttle astronaut groups, many intriguing and untold stories behind the selection process are revealed in the book. The often extraordinary backgrounds and personal ambitions of these skilled pilots, chosen to continue NASA’s exploration and knowledge of the space frontier, are also examined.

In April 1966 NASA selected 19 pilot astronauts whose training was specifically targeted to the Apollo lunar landing missions and the Earth-orbiting Skylab space station.  Three years later, following the sudden cancellation of the USAF’s highly classified Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) project, seven military astronauts were also co-opted into NASA’s space program.

This book represents the final chapter by the authors in the story of American astronaut selections prior to the era of the Space Shuttle. Through personal interviews and original NASA documentation, readers will also gain a true insight into a remarkable age of space travel as it unfolded in the late 1960s, and the men who flew those historic missions."

Offline aurora899

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Re: Spaceflight Book Thread
« Reply #396 on: 04/02/2017 03:58 PM »
And coming this month:

The Canadian Space Program: From Black Brant to the International Space Station (Springer Praxis Books)

by Andrew B. Godefroy (Author)
« Last Edit: 04/02/2017 03:58 PM by aurora899 »

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