Author Topic: Soyuz-ST update  (Read 143237 times)

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #40 on: 04/07/2009 03:51 PM »
http://www.rian.ru/science/20090407/167367070.html

The first two rockets will depart to CSG this summer. Works on the launch pad will be finished in September. First launch is scheduled for December 28.

Offline yinzer

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #41 on: 04/07/2009 06:34 PM »
This will be the first Soyuz launch site with a fixed ring. The digital Soyuz have roll control! The old Soyuz had to be pointed in the correct direction azimuth by rotating the launch platform.

I have heard this for many years, but it does not seem obvious to me what benefit comes from twirling the Soyuz on the pad in terms of "pointing" the rocket.


The trajectory calculation is reduced to 2 dimesions if the rocket has already pointed to the correct azimuth.

How can a rocket be "pointed" in the correct azimuth? Is the nose tilted towards the right direction?

Imagine you are sitting in a space shuttle ready to launch at KSC.  If you want to go to Hubble, you have to fly due east.  If you want to go to ISS, you have to fly northeast.  Now imagine that the space shuttle has to fly "heads down", with the ET on top and the Orbiter below.  When you start to pitch over, the windows on the top of the Orbiter will have to be facing in the direction you want to fly; east for Hubble and northeast for ISS.

The space shuttle takes off vertically, rolls about the vertical axis so the windows on top of the orbiter are pointing the right way, then gradually pitches over to horizontal and flies off to orbit.

If you didn't want to roll the space shuttle after it was flying, you could theoretically mount the launch pad on a giant turntable so you could spin the shuttle around to orient it correctly before launch.
California 2008 - taking rights from people and giving rights to chickens.

Offline sbt

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #42 on: 04/07/2009 09:54 PM »
How can a rocket be "pointed" in the correct azimuth? Is the nose tilted towards the right direction?

The space shuttle takes off vertically, rolls about the vertical axis so the windows on top of the orbiter are pointing the right way, then gradually pitches over to horizontal and flies off to orbit.

If you didn't want to roll the space shuttle after it was flying, you could theoretically mount the launch pad on a giant turntable so you could spin the shuttle around to orient it correctly before launch.

The key bits of info to completely clear the picture are that:

a) Whilst the Soyuz is symmetrical aerodynamicly it isn't in guidance terms – they can only do a large scale pitch manoeuvre around one fixed axis. There is probably also a comms and crew comfort aspect to it as well – IIRC the Shuttle goes 'Heads Down' to orbit to ensure that the communications antenna on the upper surface of the vehicle are visible to the ground (the ET would block any on the lower surface).

b) Up until the more recent recent versions of the Soyuz launcher the guidance system couldn't do the required roll to align that pitch axis correctly with the required flight path. The alignment was done by ensuring that the launcher was correctly aligned at launch by having the launcher plus support arms on a turntable.

Rick
« Last Edit: 04/07/2009 09:56 PM by sbt »
I am not interested in your political point scoring, Ad Hominem attacks, personal obsessions and vendettas. - No matter how cute and clever you may think your comments are.

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #43 on: 04/18/2009 09:16 AM »
http://www.space.com/spacenews/spacenews_summary.html#BM_5

"Soyuz is currently expected to make its first flight - with a German Defense Ministry Satcom Bw military telecommunications satellite as inaugural passenger - either late this year or early in 2010"

Offline pberrett

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #44 on: 04/18/2009 09:53 AM »
/
Quite! The English transliteration is Soyuz, the French transliteration is Soyouz. Neither is correct, just canonical in those languages.


The Australian translation is SawYouse

ie I SawYouse up in the sky  :)

cheers peter


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #45 on: 04/24/2009 03:05 PM »
April 23, 2009

http://www.arianespace.com/news-soyuz-vega/2009/2009_04_23_soyuz_launchsite_update.asp

The launch infrastructure at Soyuz’ new operating base in French Guiana has literally risen from the pad as the system of two umbilical masts and four primary support arms has now been installed.

This marks another key step in preparations of the world’s newest launch facility for the medium-lift Soyuz, which will join Arianespace’s heavy-lift Ariane 5 and the future lightweight Vega in operations at the Spaceport.

Offline @RD170@

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #46 on: 04/30/2009 09:03 PM »
The Soyuz launch infrastructure takes its place at the Spaceport

April 30, 2009


The preparation of Soyuz’ new operating base is continuing in French Guiana, where the ground-based infrastructure continues to take shape on its launch pad and inside the support facilities at Europe’s Spaceport.

This site will support operations of the medium-lift Soyuz vehicle, which will join Arianespace’s heavy-lift Ariane 5 and the future lightweight Vega in side-by-side operations from the Spaceport

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 The transporter/erector system for Soyuz is shown inside the Launcher Assembly Building.  Once a basic Soyuz vehicle’s integration is completed horizontally inside this building, the launcher is positioned atop the transporter/erector by two overhead cranes (one of which is partly visible in the upper background).  The transporter/erector is then transferred on a rail line to the launch pad, where Soyuz will be raised for integration of its payload and final launch operations.


 

This view details the rail infrastructure that supports Soyuz operations on the launch pad.  In the foreground is a straight section of track that leads to the Launcher Assembly Building, which will be utilized for the rollout of Soyuz vehicles on their transporter/erector.  The curved portion of track (visible coming from the right) will be used for a rail car that brings kerosene propellant for the fueling of Soyuz’ boosters and Block A core stage.  An additional load of kerosene that is maintained at a cooler temperature will be delivered by a wheeled truck for the fueling of Soyuz’ Block I third stage.


 

 The nearly-completed Soyuz launch system is visible in this wide-angle image.  The four primary support arms are shown in their closed position, which forms a support ring around the “waist” of Soyuz to suspend the vehicle over its launch pad.   Directly behind the two rear support arms is the set of umbilical masts that will service the Soyuz’ Block A core stage, its Block I third stage, as well as the Fregat upper stage and the vehicle’s payload.  Visible below in the launch table’s 15-meter-wide circular opening are four triangular-shaped guides that will be connected to the Soyuz’ four strap-on boosters – providing lower stability for the suspended vehicle until liftoff.   Two other arms extending into the opening are electrical supply umbilicals for the Soyuz boosters and the Block A core stage.



The Soyuz facility is surrounded by four massive lightning protection towers, which are a feature of all the launch pads at the Spaceport in French Guiana.  This picture also shows the Soyuz’ launch system in the “ready” position – with the four support arms closed and the two umbilical masts raised to service the medium-lift vehicle. A recently added element is the facility’s system of floodlights, which are installed on four masts positioned around the launch pad.

 http://www.arianespace.com/news-soyuz-vega/2009/2009_04_30_soyuz_launchsite_update.asp
 

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #47 on: 05/22/2009 05:28 PM »
http://www.space.com.ua/gateway/news.nsf/hronolR/0198C130DC772A43C22575BE0023BBB4!open

The first two Soyuz-ST rockets are completely manufactured, successfully tested, loaded into containers and will depart to Kourou in September.

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #48 on: 05/24/2009 06:56 PM »
http://www.space.com.ua/gateway/news.nsf/hronolR/0198C130DC772A43C22575BE0023BBB4!open

The first two Soyuz-ST rockets are completely manufactured, successfully tested, loaded into containers and will depart to Kourou in September.

Do you know, which versions they are: Soyuz-2-1a or Soyuz-2-1b ?


Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #49 on: 05/25/2009 07:40 AM »
The first ones will be Soyuz-2.1a, and then they will switch to Soyuz-2.1b.
Nicolas PILLET
kosmonavtika.com : The French site on Russian Space

Offline satlaunch

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #50 on: 06/04/2009 07:39 AM »
Preparations on Soyuz’ new launch site continue at the Spaceport
June 3, 2009

Activity is progressing at a sustained pace in French Guiana as the world’s newest launch site for the industry’s longest-operating launcher continues to take shape for Arianespace’s upcoming introduction of Soyuz at the Spaceport.

On the Spaceport’s launch pad, the infrastructure that maintains Soyuz in its erected position is being completed. In the nearby Launcher Assembly Building, ground support equipment for Soyuz’ integration is being prepared, and the transporter/erector rail car is readied for testing.

More info and photos: http://www.arianespace.com/news-soyuz-vega/2009/2009_06_03_soyuz_launchsite_update.asp

Offline William Graham

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #51 on: 06/16/2009 06:46 PM »
First launch has been delayed to 2010.
http://en.rian.ru/science/20090616/155269798.html

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #52 on: 06/18/2009 09:09 AM »
Activity is continuing at the Guiana Space Centre (Centre Spatial Guyanais - CSG), Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana, as the Soyuz launch site takes shape. Soyuz is a medium-class launcher and its performance will perfectly complement that of the other ESA launchers, Ariane and Vega.

See the latest photos of the Soyuz launch site:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMO230P0WF_index_0.html

Offline veryrelaxed

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #53 on: 06/18/2009 03:13 PM »
Just curious: what would be requried for a Soyuz (with crew) or Progress (with cargo) launch out of Kurou to ISS?  Seriously, well, besides the delivery of the vehicles themselves with interfaces and  with the ground support/personel?  And the Soyuz-U with the LAS as opposed to cargo version (just looking at these photos of the Kourou infrastracture, not unlike the one at Baykonour)  Thank you.
« Last Edit: 06/18/2009 03:19 PM by veryrelaxed »

Offline fregate

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #54 on: 06/20/2009 06:29 AM »
Just curious: what would be requried for a Soyuz (with crew) or Progress (with cargo) launch out of Kurou to ISS?  Seriously, well, besides the delivery of the vehicles themselves with interfaces and  with the ground support/personel?  And the Soyuz-U with the LAS as opposed to cargo version (just looking at these photos of the Kourou infrastracture, not unlike the one at Baykonour)  Thank you.
This idea has a BIG price tag - ESA completed feasability study of a manned launch of Soyuz-TMA from Kourouru in 2004:
"Soyuz-TMA in FRENCH GUIANA CCN1 Final Report" by EADS Space Transportation Division (Sep 2004), 107 pages
Link for PDF document esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/gsp/completed/C17030FR.pdf (Size 5MB)

In order to perform a manned launch the following should be provided: 
- Soyuz spacecraft transportation from Russia to Spaceport;
- Operations in Spaceport facilities (to unload SOYUZ TMA and integrate it with LV);
- Oceanic Crew Search & Resque in case of  launch abort;
 
« Last Edit: 06/20/2009 06:30 AM by fregate »
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Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #55 on: 06/23/2009 07:12 PM »
http://arms-tass.su/?page=article&aid=72291&cid=125

First two Soyuz-ST rockets will arrive to Kourou on November 25th. In the beginning of June one more ship with equipment has departed to CSG. The mobile service gantry will depart Russia in August.

Offline anik

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #56 on: 06/26/2009 08:08 PM »
Ship with Russian Equipment Arrives in French Guiana
26-06-2009

http://www.federalspace.ru/NewsDoSele.asp?NEWSID=6586

Activities on Soyuz at CSG program continue in French Guiana.
The Colibris ship with Russian equipment onboard arrived in French Guiana. However, it arrived not in Cayenne, as usual, but in Pariacabo, in order to make the transportation route shorter.
The ship delivered large components: 3 tanks for liquid oxygen, 2 tanks for liquid nitrogen and railway cerosene filling station.
Unloading will take about a week. Russian space industry experts will begin integration of the delivered equipment at the launch site after that.

Offline Spacenick

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #57 on: 06/26/2009 08:39 PM »
What would be requiered for a Progess launch from guiana? As opposed to a crewed Soyuz launch that would need atlantic resque capability (and that for a spacecraft that is not designed to land in the water)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #58 on: 06/29/2009 07:08 PM »
29-06-2009 Russian Equipment Shipped to French Guiana is Unloaded from the Colibris Vessel

http://www.roscosmos.ru/NewsDoSele.asp?NEWSID=6604

Activities on Soyuz at CSG program continue in French Guiana.
The Colibris ship with Russian equipment onboard arrived in French Guiana last Friday. The ship delivered large components: 3 tanks for liquid oxygen, 2 tanks for liquid nitrogen and railway cerosene filling station.

Unloading has already commenced. In about a week, Russian space industry experts will begin integration of the delivered equipment at the launch site.
Russian Federal Space Agency is responsible for the Soyuz at CSG program on Russian side and coordinates work with Russian space industrial companies involved in the program, which comprise TSENKI< Lavochkin R&D, TSKB Progress. 
 

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Soyuz-ST update
« Reply #59 on: 07/23/2009 05:48 PM »
Soyuz rail network and kerosene propellant delivery system is validated at the Spaceport

July 23, 2009

The ground infrastructure at the Spaceport’s new Soyuz launch site is the center of attention as preparations advance for Arianespace’s 2010 introduction of this legendary medium-lift vehicle to its family of launchers. 

For a review of the latest activity, see the images:

http://www.arianespace.com/news-soyuz-vega/2009/2009_07_23_soyuz_launchsite_update.asp

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