Author Topic: Iranian Space  (Read 479594 times)

Offline Sith

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #40 on: 09/18/2008 10:23 PM »
Wasn't the first American astronaut Alan Shepard???

Offline Rusty_Barton

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #41 on: 09/18/2008 10:32 PM »
Wasn't the first American astronaut Alan Shepard???

Yes, but it was only sub-orbital flight. Only 115 miles high. He landed 300 miles down range and reached a maximum speed a little over 5,000 mph.
 

Offline Sith

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #42 on: 09/18/2008 10:38 PM »
5 000mph are how many kilometers :???:

Online William Graham

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #43 on: 09/18/2008 10:41 PM »
5 000mph are how many kilometers :???:

About 8,000 kilometres per hour (2.2 km/s).

Offline Sith

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #44 on: 09/18/2008 11:00 PM »
1 mile is 1,853 or 1,609 kilometers?

1 case: 5 000 mph ~ 9265 km/h :???:
2 case: 5 000 mph ~ 8045 km/h :P:

Offline Rusty_Barton

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #45 on: 09/18/2008 11:03 PM »
1 mile is 1,853 or 1,609 kilometers?

1 case: 5 000 mph ~ 9265 km/h :???:
2 case: 5 000 mph ~ 8045 km/h :P:

In any case it was a little less than 1/3 the velocity needed to achieve orbit. It was a test mission with a less powerful rocket (Redstone) not intended to achieve orbit. The Atlas rocket was needed to achieve orbital velocity with a Mercury capsule.

Offline iamlucky13

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #46 on: 09/19/2008 06:12 PM »
1 mile is 1,853 or 1,609 kilometers?

1 case: 5 000 mph ~ 9265 km/h :???:
2 case: 5 000 mph ~ 8045 km/h :P:

The first is nautical miles. The second is statute miles. Speed using nautical miles would be knots. Unless the text says nautical miles, nm, or knots, it's usually best to assume statute miles.

As far as Iranian manned orbital ambitions, the Safir is just slightly smaller than the Redstone rockets we used to launch our first suborbital mission. However, at the time we were doing that, we had several other major rocket development programs ongoing, most notably the much larger Atlas rocket which launched John Glenn into orbit less than a year later. Iran doesn't have any similarly large rockets in development, to the best of my knowledge.

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #47 on: 09/25/2008 12:54 PM »
New AP article on the next launch attempt : http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080925/ap_on_sc/ml_iran_ahmadinejad;_ylt=AhKk0Gjoijbikm9VSsmgBR2s0NUE

Not much new, but
Quote
  Ahmadinejad said the Persian nation will soon "launch a rocket, which has 16 engines and will take a satellite some 430 miles" into space.

16 huh? Is this what we call a scud super heavy? OTRAG reborn?
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Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #48 on: 11/26/2008 09:10 PM »
News on latest flight Nov 26, 2008 in "suborbital thread"

Offline osiossim

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #49 on: 11/27/2008 12:52 PM »

Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #50 on: 12/08/2008 12:50 AM »
From Reuters 12/7/08 - missile launch, not a space launch

Iran's military test-fired a new surface-to-surface missile from a warship as part of exercises along a strategic shipping route, state media reported on Sunday.

Iran launched six days of naval war games on Tuesday in the Sea of Oman and the Gulf region amid tension with the United States and Israel, which have not ruled out military action if diplomacy fails to end a row over Tehran's nuclear work.

Iran has said that, if pushed, it could close the Strait of Hormuz at the entrance to the Gulf and through which about 40 percent of the world's traded oil passes.

"The surface-to-surface Nasr-2 missile was tested in the (Sea of) Oman operational region," state radio reported, adding that the test took place on Saturday.

"The Nasr-2 was fired from a warship and hit its target at a distance of 30 km (19 miles) and destroyed it," the official news agency IRNA said, adding it was the first test of the new, medium-range missile.

The West accuses Iran of seeking to build nuclear warheads, a charge Tehran denies. It insists that it wants to master nuclear technology to generate electricity so that it can export more of its huge oil and gas reserves.

Washington, which has its navy Fifth Fleet based in the Gulf Arab state of Bahrain, has pledged to keep shipping lanes open. Experts say Iran's navy would be no match for U.S. technology but could still create havoc in the waterway.


Online William Graham

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #51 on: 12/08/2008 08:03 AM »
That wouldn't have even reached space

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #52 on: 02/03/2009 09:37 AM »
For news  and updates about the first satellite launch of Iran see:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=15771.0

Offline Satori

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #53 on: 10/06/2009 11:14 PM »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #54 on: 10/08/2009 06:43 PM »
From Xinhua: Iran to launch research rocket into space.
From the article:
"The rocket can be sent to altitudes at the height of 50km to 150km"

That sounds more to a suborbital flight than an orbital one.

Offline Yarrah

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #55 on: 10/13/2009 02:21 PM »
The 'Mesbah' satellite is ready for launch

http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=108455&sectionid=351020101

Offline koroljow

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #56 on: 10/13/2009 04:37 PM »
from http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=108455&sectionid=351020101:
Quote
...Sadly for Iran, the first attempt to launch the satellite failed in 2005.

This is new to me. I wasn't aware that Iran actually tried to launch Mesbah in 2005. See here http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/mesbah-1.htm:
Quote
Mesbah 1 was scheduled to be launched in late 2005 onboard a Kosmos-3M launch vehicle from the Pletsesk Cosmodrome, which did not happen. Currently the status of the satellite is unknown, but a planned launch on the Iranian Safir launch vehicle has been reported.

Or do they talk about the Kosmos-3M launch (27/10/2005) with - what I thought - a russian made satellite called Sinah? Did it break down after reaching orbit? Any other matching events in 2005?!

Any thoughts on this?
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Offline Bean Kenobi

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #57 on: 10/13/2009 05:49 PM »
I think they mean that the satellite didn't left the ground because it was dropped from the launch which occurred in 2005. No launch failure, just failure to embark ;)

Offline koroljow

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #58 on: 10/13/2009 08:24 PM »
I think they mean that the satellite didn't left the ground because it was dropped from the launch which occurred in 2005. No launch failure, just failure to embark ;)
Well, that makes sense...
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Online Jirka Dlouhy

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Re: Iranian Space
« Reply #59 on: 10/19/2009 08:44 PM »
Safir-2 has been prepared at the pad maybe with Mesbah satellite atop the carrier.

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0910/18iran/