Author Topic: ARCA Space Corporation  (Read 40218 times)

Online matthewkantar

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #200 on: 10/05/2017 03:17 AM »
With apologies to Complete Idiots Guides.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #201 on: 10/06/2017 06:59 PM »


They say for their SpacePort America test flight they’ll go to 25km altitude with a 30s burn of the aero spike engine. This means they can go for an FAA waiver rather than a license.

Online savuporo

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #202 on: 10/06/2017 07:05 PM »
Today i learned that launching to 25km vs 100km altitude is actually "not a very big difference"
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline ringsider

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #203 on: 10/06/2017 07:12 PM »
Today i learned that launching to 25km vs 100km altitude is actually "not a very big difference"

Log scale...

Offline Davidthefat

Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #204 on: 10/06/2017 07:42 PM »
I'm curious, how many employees do they have? We only see the same 3 people in the videos actually working on hardware. Some of the people shown in the previous videos do not seem to show up anymore.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #205 on: 10/07/2017 03:29 AM »
Today i learned that launching to 25km vs 100km altitude is actually "not a very big difference"

What was important was the burnout altitude for testing the aerospike engine from sea level to vacuum. A 30 second burn has a burn out altitude of 15 km and peak altitude of 25 km. For a full burn, the burn out altitude is 27 km and peak altitude is 100 km. At 15 km, the pressure is 14 kPa compared with 2 kPa at 27 km. Sea level is 101 kPa. So, while 14 kPa is still far from a vacuum, they should be able to test their model of the engine.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online savuporo

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #206 on: 10/08/2017 04:13 AM »
Well you don't actually have to go to any altitude to test the engine. There are vacuum chambers around, and they aren't getting much use.
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #207 on: 10/08/2017 04:29 AM »
Well you don't actually have to go to any altitude to test the engine. There are vacuum chambers around, and they aren't getting much use.

You need a vacuum chamber that can pump out the gases from the engine. That's not easy to do. The most common way is to use low density steam to displace high density air.
« Last Edit: 10/08/2017 04:30 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline ringsider

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #208 on: 10/08/2017 07:28 AM »
Like this:


Offline john smith 19

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #209 on: 10/08/2017 09:49 AM »
Well you don't actually have to go to any altitude to test the engine. There are vacuum chambers around, and they aren't getting much use.

You need a vacuum chamber that can pump out the gases from the engine. That's not easy to do. The most common way is to use low density steam to displace high density air.
Indeed.  IIRC the classic way is to do a diffuser on the end and have a big steam tank.  Trouble is I think most of these are either quite big (and expensive to rent) or custom built.

ARCA seem to have the right mindset for this. It's a test vehicle. Use it to collect data to drive the actual design. Don't get bogged down trying to get the maximum amount of data. while going to 2% of Psl would no doubt be very useful 14% should give them a good idea of what's going on, and get that much faster.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.

Offline LooksFlyable

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #210 on: 10/15/2017 09:19 PM »
I'm curious, how many employees do they have? We only see the same 3 people in the videos actually working on hardware. Some of the people shown in the previous videos do not seem to show up anymore.

What you see in the videos in NM are not the only members of the ARCA team. There's quite a few camera shy team members.
« Last Edit: 10/15/2017 09:21 PM by LooksFlyable »

Offline catdlr

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Re: ARCA Space Corporation
« Reply #211 on: 10/18/2017 02:48 AM »
Flight of the Aerospike: Episode 17 - Romanian Team (Part 1)

ARCA Space Corporation
Published on Oct 17, 2017


This week, the conduit testing continues and Dumitru flies home for a short break. Dumitru and Dragos discuss their history and the philosophy of ARCA, as well as a new project.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPk2ctLxMTc?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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