Author Topic: Boeing Selects Atlas V Launch Vehicle for CST-100 - August 4, 2011  (Read 75038 times)

Offline Longhorn John

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I hope this doesn't beat AV and Dream Chaser in the competition selections.

Offline Terry Rocket

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I hope this doesn't beat AV and Dream Chaser in the competition selections.

Agreed. From a public interest level, this capsule on the top is about as inspiring as a wet fart compared to Dream Chaser.

Offline kevin-rf

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Atlas V is fast becoming my favourite unmanned rocket. That is all. :)
Atlas V is fast becoming my favourite manned rocket! ;) (post-shuttle)
It has been Jim's for years, you have been assimilated ;)

I love the test as you fly instead of testing the abort system on a sounding rocket. I think this is a first in US manned spaceflight.

What I like out of this, it finally means the work needed to bring Dual Engine Centaur to the Atlas V will finally be done.
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Offline Alpha Control

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So what does the future hold for the Delta IV? Looks like it's the loser in all the CCDEV choices. Is there enough other business for it to remain viable?

Its existence is not contingent on commercial crew.

CCDev is not the proper term.  It is only a development project

Thanks Jim. Glad to hear that Delta remains viable.
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Offline Ben the Space Brit

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So what does the future hold for the Delta IV? Looks like it's the loser in all the CCDEV choices. Is there enough other business for it to remain viable?

That's a question that we've been discussion on various EELV-oriented threads.  Purely FWIW, I suspect that being 'All-American' (i.e. no pesky Energomash or NK Engines core engines), Delta-IV will still get some DoD business to secure its future for the short-term (until ~2020).  Indeed, the selection of Atlas-V-412 by Boeing actually improves Delta-IV's prospects as fewer Atlas-V launch slots will be available for DoD and other USG cargo payloads.  Long term, DoD is looking to develop such goodies as fly-back boosters and such things, so the EELVs will likely be replaced by the 2030s.


I hope this doesn't beat AV and Dream Chaser in the competition selections.

Seriously, CST-100 might look boring but that isn't a bad thing from an engineering standpoint.  If we learn nothing else from Shuttle it is that those winning looks tend to bring with it programatic and engineering risk.  Right now, low-risk, high-confidence is the solution NASA needs.  Purely IMHO, that means CST-100/Atlas-V.
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Offline Rocket Science

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I feel NASA has a warm spot for Dream Chaser and could use the excuse of new technology demonstrator....
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Offline robertross

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If NASA selects Boeing for a development contract with sufficient funding, ULA will provide launch services for an autonomous orbital flight, a transonic autonomous abort test launch, and a crewed launch, all in 2015.

Whoa, they're actually going to do an in-flight abort test? That'll be interesting...

Yeah, I thought that was impressive, and I like it. Real world beats simulations any day.

woot for Atlas V!!
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Offline Space Pete

Apparently, two lucky Boeing test pilots will get to fly the CST-100 to the ISS on its first crewed flight!

I'm sure there will be room for a third tag-along ISS fan who could blog the whole thing for NSF - no fee required, I'll sign any waiver you want! ;D
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Offline Rocket Science

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Apparently, two lucky Boeing test pilots will get to fly the CST-100 to the ISS on its first crewed flight!

I'm sure there will be room for a third tag-along ISS fan who could blog the whole thing for NSF - no fee required, I'll sign any waiver you want! ;D
It will require a fair and open competition in 6 years... :D
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Offline gladiator1332

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I thought they were designing CST-100 to be compatible with several launch vehicles?

Or is this just a formal announcement for the initial test flights?

Offline Jim

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If CST-100 does end up flying, it is another potential cargo craft.  It might not be volumetricly efficient but it will be another option.


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The return of the black zone busters
« Last Edit: 08/04/2011 04:38 PM by Jim »

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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I thought they were designing CST-100 to be compatible with several launch vehicles?

As I understand it, it could operate with several vehicles.

Or is this just a formal announcement for the initial test flights?

Again, as I understand it, this is the selected initial launch provider for all missions.  Boeing are smart enough to leave the door open if another LV comes along that is cheaper and offers an acceptable level of reliability but it's Atlas for now.
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Offline edkyle99

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George Sowers: CST-100 will use the Atlas 5 412 configuration (one solid strap-on, dual-engine Centaur).
(Jeff Foust)

The strap-on solid bothers me for crewed flight.   

 - Ed Kyle

Offline EE Scott

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If CST-100 does end up flying, it is another potential cargo craft.  It might not be volumetricly efficient but it will be another option.


OSP mark II.
The return of the black zone busters

I surely appreciate the optimism.  This version may cost less than Mark I would have but it will take longer than necessary.  Maybe that's OK.  Yet a more robust funding structure would speed things up drastically - but also change the nature of the program as well.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2011 04:48 PM by EE Scott »
Scott

Offline Lee Jay

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George Sowers: CST-100 will use the Atlas 5 412 configuration (one solid strap-on, dual-engine Centaur).
(Jeff Foust)

The strap-on solid bothers me for crewed flight.   

 - Ed Kyle

That's one reason for the LAS, right?

Offline mmeijeri

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The strap-on solid bothers me for crewed flight.   

But Liberty's solid first stage doesn't?
We will be vic-toooooo-ri-ous!!!

Offline EE Scott

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George Sowers: CST-100 will use the Atlas 5 412 configuration (one solid strap-on, dual-engine Centaur).
(Jeff Foust)

The strap-on solid bothers me for crewed flight.   

 - Ed Kyle

I wonder what, if any, safety upgrades will be made to the Aerojet Atlas SRBs?  They've already gone through one upgrade process to increase reliability if I remember correctly.
Scott

Offline MP99

I don't know how likely it is, but this article is certainly intriguing.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2011/08/03/will-boeing-choose-atlas-v-or-liberty-to-launch-cst-100/

Interested in the comment "[t]he upgraded boosters that had been developed under Ares I would be cheaper because they incorporated changes that NASA had not allowed to be used on the shuttle version."

What would those changes be?

cheers, Martin

Offline Prober

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George Sowers: CST-100 will use the Atlas 5 412 configuration (one solid strap-on, dual-engine Centaur).
(Jeff Foust)

The strap-on solid bothers me for crewed flight.   

 - Ed Kyle

The Atlas V could be the answer, only problem is that term "funding"

Does this mean to go forward 3 sets of engines would need to be "man rated" ?

The other problem is the RD-180.  IMHO Boeing screwed up by seling Rocketdyne.  Had they kept Rocketdyne they could compete with SpaceX on costs.


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Offline e of pi

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Apparently, two lucky Boeing test pilots will get to fly the CST-100 to the ISS on its first crewed flight!

I'm sure there will be room for a third tag-along ISS fan who could blog the whole thing for NSF - no fee required, I'll sign any waiver you want! ;D

Press to Orbit indeed. :)

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