Author Topic: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)  (Read 46595 times)

Offline eeergo

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #140 on: 02/15/2017 09:22 AM »
Press conference from the SOLAR team on the experiment's shutdown:

https://livestream.com/ESA/solar

Interesting presentations including discussion of military uses of space weather.

I remember reading a LinkedIn article that was linked somewhere on the forum yesterday, but I don't find it any longer - feel free to translate this to where it was posted.
-DaviD-

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #141 on: 02/16/2017 01:31 AM »
SAGE III on ISS: Building on a Storied Legacy

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Feb 15, 2017
The SAGE III instrument is all set for launch to the International Space Station Saturday, Feb. 18, at 10:01 a.m. EST aboard SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-10. From its new home on orbit, SAGE will monitor the Earth's ozone levels and aerosols. SAGE III is the latest in a series of missions that started back in the 1970s with Deke Slayton using a handheld instrument. From these humble beginnings, scientists and engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center have built a long-term record of important Earth science data.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nu5TL8ZP0IU?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #142 on: 02/16/2017 11:42 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/14/2017

Posted on February 14, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Transition to (X2) R15 Software:  As part of the R15 software transition, two of the three Command and Control (C&C) Multiplexer/Demultiplexers (MDMs) were transitioned to updated software today. Updates to the C&C MDMs include:
•Visiting Vehicle Support
•Implement modified capability for loading patches
•Modification to Rapid Depress Auto-Response
•Dual Integrated Communications Unit (ICU) Capability
•Increase number of Telemetry Format Versions to meet VV Requirements
•Improvements to Longeron Shadowing Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) response

Following the C&C transition to CCS R5 the crew replaced the Portable Computer System (PCS) hard drives with new ones.

Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect Rodent Research-4 (RR-4) Preparations: The crew continued with RR-4 preparation activities prior to SpaceX-10 (SpX-10) planned arrival on Monday, February 20. This morning the crew completed the habitat installation activities, installing Habitats C and D. Telemetry and video were received from both Habitats. The crew also configured the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Life Science Ancillary Hardware (LSAH) for RR-4 operations. The LSAH provides ability to decontaminate the MSG work volume after execution of any experiment with biological hazards. Both the RR-4 and Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) payloads will have their own LSAH configurations within the MSG.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Logistics Installation: The crew completed the RFID Logistics installation this morning, configuring antennas in Node 1. This afternoon, they configured the RFID Logistics Readers and Antennas in the Lab. After each installation, the crew photographed the configuration and downlinked for ground team evaluation. The RFID Logisitics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Universal Docking Port (UDP): The crew performed the second in a series of test runs for the SPHERES UDP payload. They then loaded the test software and performed the session with ground support staff direction. The objectives of the UDP session are to demonstrate a reliably successful docking through running multiple, repeatable docking maneuvers using both global metrology and docking port cameras; perform joint maneuvers of docked satellites using the thrusters from two satellites to demonstrate controllability; and test an algorithm for docking to a satellite which is tumbling in a slow, known manner. The addition of the Docking Ports is a critical upgrade to the SPHERES facility aboard the ISS. With the new ability to dock and undock, SPHERES provides a test bed to address many of the challenges of combining autonomous spacecraft. Mated spacecraft can assemble complex systems in orbit or combine sensors and actuators for satellite servicing and repurposing missions. The SPHERES-UDP enables testing of complex tasks through optimal and adaptive control, autonomous decision-making processes, and real-time image processing.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #143 on: 02/16/2017 02:57 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/15/2017

Posted on February 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Transition to (X2) R15 Software:  As part of the R15 software transition, the Payload (PL) Multiplexer/Demultiplexers (MDMs) were transitioned to updated software Payload Executive Processor R12 (PEP R12) today. Updates to the PL MDMs include:
•Redundancy Management Time Reduction

Additionally, the Lab-1 (LA-1) MDM was transitioned to Lab System-R5 (LSYS1-R5) software. Updates to the LA-1 MDM includes:
•Checksum region expanded to include restart vector
•Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) setpoint telemetry updates

Tomorrow, the Port 1 (P1) and Starboard 1 (S1) MDMs will be updated to new software.

Capillary Flow Experiment-2 Interior Corner Flow-9 (CFE ICF-9): The crew used a CFE-2 vessel to perform several Interior Corner Flow tests that show the passive capillary driven redistribution of liquid in a container in low-gravity due to the specific fluid properties and 3-D geometry of the container and the spontaneous phase separation characteristics of such flows when bubbles are introduced into the liquid. CFE-ICF studies capillary flow in interior corners. Structured inside tanks providing interior corners are used in the design of fuel tanks so that the fuel will always flow to the outlet of the tank in the absence of gravity. The equations governing the process are known but, to date, have not been solved analytically because of a lack of experimental data identifying the appropriate boundary conditions for the flow problem. Experimental results will guide the analysis by providing the necessary boundary conditions as a function of container cross section and fill fraction. The benchmarked theory can then be used to improve propellant management aboard spacecraft.

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Operations: The crew removed the Robotics External Leak Locator (RELL) and JEM ORU Transfer Interface (JOTI) from the JEMAL Slide Table this morning following this past weekend’s successful operations.  The crew then installed the Small Fine Arm Attachment Mechanism (SAM) and Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) on the Slide Table.  Later this week, the crew will install NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #10 which will be deployed after SpaceX-10 and 66 Progress have docked to the ISS.

Human Research Facility (HRF) Collections: Upon wakeup the crew performed their Flight Day 120 (FD120) Biochemical Profile and Repository blood and urine collections.  The samples collected were placed in Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body. Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Logistics: Yesterday, the crew installed antennas in the Lab and Node 1 modules.  After activation, ground teams identified Node 1 Reader 1 was not providing data.  Based on downlink photos teams determined that a power cable was not connected.  Today, the crew completed the RFID Logistics hardware in Node 2 and successfully connected the power cable to the Node 1 Reader 1 recovering the Node 1 capabilities. The RFID Logistics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station. 

Solar Platform Powerdown: With the completion of the Solar experiment the Solar platform was unpowered for the final time.  The Solar platform is planned to return on SpaceX-12. Solar is a monitoring observatory that will measure the solar spectral irradiance. Apart from scientific contributions for solar and stellar physics, the knowledge of the solar energy irradiance into the Earth’s atmosphere and its variations is of great importance for atmospheric modeling, atmospheric chemistry and climatology. The three experiments mounted on Solar are Solar Variable and Irradiance Monitor (SOVIM) observing the near-ultraviolet, visible and thermal regions of the spectrum (200 nanometers – 100 micrometers); SOLar SPECtral Irradiance Measurements (SOLSPEC) observing the 180 – 3000 nanometer range with high spectral resolution; and SOLar Auto-Calibrating Extreme UV/UV Spectrometers (SOLACES) measures the EUV/UV spectrum range (17 nanometers – 220 nanometers) with moderate spectral resolution.

SpaceX-10 Preparation:  The crew, along with ground specialists, performed a nominal checkout the COTS UHF Communication Unit (CUCU) system.  Dragon Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) requires two fully functional ISS CUCU equipment strings. CUCU is critical for Relative Global Positioning System (RGPS) navigation and is required for Dragon telemetry and command during final R-bar approach when the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) link may be blocked by ISS structure.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Overnight the Ground Robotic Controllers will stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), walk the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off to Node2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) and maneuver SSRMS to the offset grapple park position.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #144 on: 02/17/2017 06:24 PM »
Expedition 50 - In-Flight Event for Fox NewsEdge Affiliate Service
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10011

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #145 on: 02/18/2017 07:35 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/16/2017

Posted on February 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Transition to (X2) R15 Software:  As part of the R15 software transition, the Starboard 1 (S1) and Port 1 (P1) Multiplexer/Demultiplexers (MDMs) were transitioned to updated software S1P1 R6. Updates to the S1 and P1 MDMs include:
•Longeron Fault Detection Isolation & Recovery (FDIR) updates to protect for Beta Gimbal Assembly (BGA) stall conditions
•Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ) shutdown sequence improvements
•TRRJ Toothcrash Recovery update

This completed the X2R15 software load.

Robonaut Troubleshooting: Today the crew continued with the debugging of the Robonaut Compact Peripheral Component Interconnect (CPCI) Power Supply fault. These activities built upon the troubleshooting performed on February 1 and other previous operations to remove cables, computer cards and investigate the intermittent fault the Robonaut is currently experiencing. Removal of all cards and an inspection of the CPCI chassis, where the computer cards were previously located, may also be required. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. Robonaut is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat track. Robonaut is currently operated inside the ISS; in the future, it will perform tasks both inside and outside the ISS. The Robonaut Teleoperations System enables Robonaut to mimic the motions of a crewmember wearing specialized gloves, a vest and a visor providing a three-dimensional view through Robonaut’s eyes.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Logistics Installation: The crew continued to install the readers and antennas today, in the Node 2 module.  Due to cable routing issues, the crew was unable to fully mate the power cables to all of the deployed equipment.  Ground teams are looking into potential work-arounds and corrective actions.  Cabling issues identified yesterday were corrected and the deployed antennas and readers in the Lab and Node 1 are all nominal. The RFID Logistics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station.

Google Street View: After having a conference with ground support teams, the crew configured on-board digital cameras with a fisheye lens to capture 360 degree images of the Cupola, Node 3, and PMM modules.  Additional ISS modules will be mapped to provide an imaged topology to be used for educational community outreach.


Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2). Then the SSRMS was walked off MBS PDGF1 onto Node2 PDGF. Finally, SSRMS was maneuvered to the Offset Grapple Park position for the SpX-10 Crew Offset grapple practice. MSS performance today was nominal.

SpaceX-10 (SpX-10) On-Board Training (OBT) Offset Grapple Practice: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Serving System (MSS) and performed a SpX-10 Offset Grapple practice session. Ground Controllers also performed the MSS Pre-Launch Checkouts. The USOS crew practiced maneuvering the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into the grapple envelope of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF). After the Offset Grapples Practice session, the crew participated in a conference with ground specialists. Robotics ground controllers then maneuvered the SSRMS to the Rendezvous Park Position in preparation for SpX-10 capture on February 20th.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #146 on: 02/21/2017 02:25 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/17/2017

Posted on February 17, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #10 Installation: This morning the crew installed two Quad deployers on the attachment mechanisms on the JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table. Only one Quad has satellites loaded, the second Quad is required for proper fit of the Multi-Layered Insulation (MLI) protective cover.  The deployment is scheduled for after the berthing and dockings of SpX-10 and 66P.  The five satellites loaded include four 3U sized (1U = 10 x 10 x 10 cm cube) LEMUR-2 and one 3U TechEdSat and one 3U spacer.  The LEMUR-2 satellites are equipped to provide AIS Data (Maritime Domain Awareness) and GPS-RO Data (Weather). The TechEdSat investigation studies a new system called the Exo-Brake, which uses a spacecraft’s own atmospheric drag to change its velocity and adjust its approach. This investigation tests the controls, avionics and methods that may be used on future spacecraft using the Exo-Brake system, including small payloads returning to Earth or landing on Mars.

Veg-03 Harvest and Cleaning:  The crew is scheduled to harvest the Chinese cabbage from the Veggie facility. The crew has been given approval to consume some of the harvest and the remainder of the harvest will be stowed in Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Following the harvest, the Veggie facility will be cleaned and sanitized prior to the use of Veggie for the APEX-4 payload being delivered by SpaceX-10.  Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the Space Shuttle and ISS made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members have used to successfully grow flowers and lettuce in space. Tests determine which types of microorganisms are present in space-grown cabbage, providing baseline data for future crop-growing efforts. Behavioral health surveys assess the impact of growing plants on crew morale and mood.

Strata-1 Card Changeout: The crew replaced four Strata Secure Digital (SD) data cards and transferred the files from the removed SD cards to a Station Support Computer (SSC) for ground teams to downlink and distribute. Strata-1 investigates the properties and behavior of regolith on small, airless bodies. Regolith is the impact-shattered “soil” found on asteroids, comets, the Moon, and other airless worlds, but it is different from soil here on Earth in that it contains no living material. Strata-1’s goal is to give us answers about how regolith behaves and moves in microgravity, how easy or difficult it is to anchor a spacecraft in regolith, how it interacts with spacecraft and spacesuit materials, and other important properties. It is important to NASA to know how to set anchors in regolith, how to safely move and process large volumes of regolith, and predict and prevent risk to spacecraft and astronauts visiting these small bodies. Also, understanding the whole-body context of material returned to Earth from small asteroids, such as by the NASA OSIRIS-REx mission, the JAXA Hayabusa 1 and 2 missions, and the proposed NASA Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is scientifically beneficial.

Intravehicular Activity (IVA) Imagery of Radiator Beam Valve Module (RBVM) P1-3-2:  External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS) Loop B has had a chronic leak for multiple years, however telemetry indicates that the leak rate has been increasing.  During the Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) operations last weekend, an increased magnitude of vapor ammonia was detected in the vicinity of RBVM P1-3-2.  To assist in the investigation into the source of the leak, earlier today ground flight controllers positioned the Port Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ) to allow the crew to perform a high resolution still and video imagery inspection of RBVM P1-3-2 from Cupola Window 1.

Space-X 10 (SpX-10) Preparation:  Today the crew is scheduled to perform a second session of Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) in preparation for SpX-10 capture.  This training session includes material for the crew to perform Self Study before performing the ROBoT session, which includes a 30m approach, two Capture Point (CP)-hold runs, and 2m runs.  The crew also gathered Node 2 vestibule outfitting equipment in preparation for Dragon install. 

United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) Hatch Seal Inspection:  The crew cleaned and inspected all USOS Common Hatches (including Node 2, Node 3, PMM, Columbus, and JEM Hatches), Hatch Plate Sealing Surface, and Hatch Handle Mechanism for Foreign Object Debris (FOD) or damage.  This is a routine maintenance task performed every six-months.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #147 on: 02/21/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/18/2017

Posted on February 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

With the delay in SpaceX-10 launch, Monday will be an off duty day for the ISS crew.

There will be no IMC reports sent on Monday, February 20th. Nominal reporting will resume Tuesday morning.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #148 on: 02/22/2017 01:20 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/21/2017

Posted on February 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Preparation for Dragon Arrival:  Dragon successfully lifted off on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center, Florida Sunday 19-February at 8:39 am CST.  Today Dragon will continue to phase towards the ISS for a planned capture on Wednesday 22-February at approximately 5:00 am CST.  Onboard the ISS the USOS crew participated in a Dragon cargo transfer conference with ground specialist.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2): The crew was unable to locate the one-of-a-kind power cable and stood down from MED-2 technical evaluation operations while ground teams investigated the potential locations. The crew was able to provide input for potential placement of cameras for future MED-2 exercise investigations. The microgravity environment of space weakens muscle and bone, so orbiting crew members spend significant amounts of time exercising. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tag Installation and Calibration: Last week the crew installed the RFID antennas around the hatchways of the US Lab, Node 1 and Node 2, which are continuously scanning to measure the RFID tags that are transported through the hatchways and modules.  Today the crew installed 16 marker tags in each the US Lab, Node 1 and Node 2 in a roughly uniform distribution throughout the module.  The crew then performed a calibration by attaching an RFID tag to a video camera.  They then translated through the three modules at different rates of speed.  Ground teams will then take the time-tagged video data and RFID collected data to calibrate the antennas. The RFID Logistics experiment aims to utilize RFID enabled tags on hardware throughout the ISS, and assist in the tracking of the hardware as it is moved around the station. 

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Camera Cover Removal: The crew translated and rotated the CIR Optics Bench in order to access the Intensified Camera Package. They uninstalled the camera at Universal Mounting Location-2 (UML-2) at the back of the Optics Bench and removed the CIR Soft Window cover. The Intensified Camera Package was reinstalled and Optics Bench rotated back into position. During a ground checkout on February 10, teams were unable to complete a calibration of the camera packages for the Cool Flames Experiment.  After investigation by ground specialists it was determined that the Window Cover was still attached. Teams will resume checkout and calibration activities of thee CIR for the Cool Flames experiment following today’s completed activities.  The Cool Flames Investigation will provide new insight into the phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot, then appear to go out — but they continue burning at a much lower temperature, with no visible flames (cool flames). Understanding cool flame combustion helps scientists develop new engines and fuels that are more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) Exchange: The crew changed out the SCA in the Solidification Quenching Furnace (SQF), removing the calibration cartridge and inserting the first test sample. Ground teams will initiate the runs next week. The Batch-2b of the Materials Science Laboratory Sample Cartridge Assemblies serves two projects investigating how different phases organize in a structure when metallic alloys are solidified. The project Metastable Solidification of Composites (METCOMP) studies the phase formed by the reaction of the remaining liquid phase with an already formed solid, to form a second solid phase on cooling. For this purpose, Bronze (Copper-Tin Alloys) of different compositions will be processed. The other project, Solidification along a Eutectic path in Ternary Alloys (SETA), looks at how two phases that form together organize into lamellar, or fiber, structures when cooling Aluminum (Copper-Silver Alloys). Both projects will provide benchmark samples that will enable to test numerical models that aim to predict these structures.

Lighting Effects Vision Test: The crew performed a Visual Performance Test in which they configured the Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) in their Crew Quarters (CQ) to the correct mode, turning off all other light sources, then performed one Numerical Verification Test and one Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Microscope Setup: In support of the Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) payload to be delivered by SpX-10 the crew configured a microscope outside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

Haptics-2: During today’s Haptics-2 experiment the 1-Degree of Freedom (1-DOF) joystick failed.  No resistance was felt when moving the handle without pressing the yellow activation button. When the crew pressed the activation button and moved the joystick an off-nominal mechanical/electrical sound was heard, suggesting a possible mechanical failure. Teams decided to stand down for operations and downlink the log files to investigate the issue. Haptics-2 is a technology demonstration experiment aimed at validating control interactions to take place between space and ground. In particular, this experiment allows for an astronaut crew in space to control, in real-time, robotic assets on Earth, using force feedback. The operational experience gained from Haptics-2 could be vital for future exploration missions beyond Earth orbit, where astronauts would be able to control robotic assets to maximize scientific operations on Mars, asteroids, and other exploration targets.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle (UR) Routine Maintenance:  The crew performed a change out of the WHC UR and insert filter. After replacement, a functionality test of the WHC was successfully performed.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Rope Replace: As part of routine maintenance, the crew replaced both ARED cable arm ropes.

Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 02/23/2017 12:50 PM by John44 »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #150 on: 02/23/2017 02:14 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/22/2017

Posted on February 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

66 Progress (66P) Launch: 66P launched successfully from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Tuesday at 11:23 pm CST with nominal ascent. Docking is scheduled for Friday, February 24th at 2:36 am CST.

SpaceX (SpX)-10 Capture: This morning’s rendezvous was aborted as a result of a bad ISS state vector being uplinked to the Dragon vehicle.  The SpaceX team is in the process of analyzing the cause of this bad state vector and how to prevent this in the future.  The ISS and SpaceX teams are preparing to perform a re-rendezvous tomorrow, February 23rd.  Capture is tentatively planned for 11:00 GMT (5:00 am CST).

Crew Day:  As a result of the aborted SpX-10 capture, ground teams have elected to make today an off-duty day for the USOS crew.  As part of their off duty time today the crew performed their routine weekend housekeeping activities, since Saturday will now be a crew work day.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) White Light Cable Swap: The crew performed a swap of the White Light Fiber Optic (F/O) moving the cable from one light source to the other. The light from the FIR White Light Lamps is transmitted through the cables to the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) microscope to provide lighting to the experiment sample. LMM Biophysics 1 (The Effect of Macromolecular Transport of Microgravity Protein Crystallization) launched on SpX-10. When installed, investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 1 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. By studying the crystals of a higher quality that can be grown in microgravity, scientists will be able to better understand their structure and how they work.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #151 on: 02/25/2017 11:44 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/23/2017

Posted on February 23, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

66 Progress (66P) Launch: All 66P systems are performing nominally. One rendezvous maneuver, DV3, was performed nominally earlier today. Checkouts of the Progress TORU system and the Progress TV system 9 have been completed with nominal results. Docking is scheduled for Friday, February 24th at 2:35 am CST.

SpaceX (SpX)-10 Capture: After yesterday’s aborted rendezvous, a successful re-rendezvous and capture was performed this morning. The crew monitored the SpaceX-10 Dragon approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation (RWS) Dragon vehicle was captured using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) at 04:44 am CST today. Robotics Ground Controllers then used the SSRMS to maneuver the Dragon to and install it on the Node-2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). This afternoon, the crew performed vestibule outfitting, CBM Control Panel Assembly (CPA) removal, and ingressed the vehicle. After ingress, the crew removed the Center Stack then retrieved and unpacked the Dragon Cargo Transfer Bag (CTB) and Double Coldbags. The Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL) CO2 Incubator Installation and the Merlin Hardware Setup were done in preparation for Microgravity Extended Stem Cells (MESC) operations scheduled for early tomorrow. Installation of TangoLab Card Cube Replace, NanoRacks Mod9 Ops, Low Temperature (LT) Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Sample Preparation and NanoRacks Module-71 were also performed.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew retrieved the NanoRacks Module-9 from SpX-10 and activated five tubes of Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP)/National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) experiments. Supporting various schools and student designed experiments studying a range of objectives, the SSEP lets students design experiments that address real challenges of living and working in space. The program also is a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, educating and inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program. Additionally, findings from student experiments such as those on bacteria growth, cell biology, food production and preservation, water quality, and seed and plant studies contribute to future experiments to benefit the space program. The following experiments were activated today:
•The Effects of Microgravity on Muscle Tissue Regeneration (McNair Academic High School, Grade 12, Jersey City, NJ)
•Shewanella oneidensis and Iron Ions in Microgravity (Bullis School, Grade 10, Potomac, MD)
•The Effect of Microgravity on Preservation of Spam Using Lemon Juice (Lincoln Middle School, Grade 8, Santa Monica, CA)
•Kidney Stone Conundrum (The Academy at Nola Dunn, Grade 5, Burleson, TX)
•Microgravity’s Effects on the Turbidity of a Fluid Mixture of Cornstarch and Water (W.J. Keenan High School, Grade 9, Columbia, SC)

JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG): The crew removed the samples from the Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST) then initiated the crystal growth. The crew activated the three different crystal sample containers then returned them to the FROST to maintain the optimal growth temperature of 4 degrees Celsius. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to make high quality protein crystals under microgravity environmental conditions. Once growth is completed, the LT PCG experiment will be returned on SpX-10 for ground team evaluation and analysis.

NanoRacks Module-71/Platform 1 Installation: The crew installed NanoRacks Module-71 into Platform 1.  Module-71 contains two plant growth experiments that will run onboard the ISS in the Platform-1 facility through the end of the SpX-10 mission.  Module-71 contains two plant growth experiments, NanoRacks-Valley Christian High School-BAM-FX– Enhanced Broccoli Seed Germination, Plant Growth and Zinc Biofortification on Orbit (NanoRacks-VCHS-BAM-FX) and NanoRacks-Edith Stein School-Vegetative Propagation of Plants in Orbit (V3PO), that aim to investigate the capability for production of large quantities of high quality vegetables on a space station. Results from the experiment will aid researchers in developing methods to provide astronauts a continuous supply of fresh vegetables on long missions. NanoRacks-VCHS-BAM-FX studies the growth of broccoli plants fortified with zinc, looking at seed germination and growth in microgravity, determining whether a bioavailable mineral nutrient formula will help plant growth.  The team responsible for V3PO is interested in vegetative plant propagation versus seeded propagation. In vegetative growth (cuttings) the desired characteristics are passed to subsequent generations of plants and ensures a uniform crop even when a few viable seeds are produced. 

Payload Card-X: The crew retrieved the inserts from SpX-10 and installed them into the TangoLab facility. The inserts on Payload Card-X cover a wide spectrum of studies including:
•Flatworms2.0: Follow up study to original flatworm regeneration study on SpX-5. Will include video and feeding capability. 
•Smooth Muscle Cell Stimulus Response: Study of — cell line after cultured in microgravity for 4 days will be hit with reagent then acetone to video response.
•Tissue Mimetic: Looking at diffusion rates of different molecular compounds in tissue proxy. Precursor to advanced tissue cultures. 
•Methanogen Growth Characterization: Comparison of growth curves between Earth and microgravity of Methanogens.
•Arabidopsis Study (Education): Arabidopsis study will be networked with real time control units in classrooms in San Francisco area of California. Precursor to larger undertaking with more schools on SpX-11 mission.
•Pharmaceutical Compound Generation:  Madagascar Periwinkle and Valeriana plants will be germinated on orbit to looking at mutation and generation of compounds used in synthesis of chemotherapies.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #152 on: 02/28/2017 02:25 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/24/2017

Posted on February 24, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

66 Progress (66P) Docking: The Progress MS-05 (66P) rendezvous and docking to ISS Docking Compartment (DC)-1 nadir port was completed successfully in the automated mode.  The docking capture time was 055/08:29:50 GMT (2:35 am CDT).  Following hatch opening the crew transferred early unstow and US cargo items.

Rodent Research-4 (RR-4) Operations: The crew conduced a conference with ground specialists prior to tomorrow’s RR-4 transfer and operations. Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (RR-4) studies what prevents vertebrates such as rodents and humans from regrowing lost bone and tissue, and how the microgravity extraterrestrial condition impacts the process. Results could lead to tissue regeneration efforts in space and a better understanding of limitations of limb regrowth at wound sites.

Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) Microscope Operations: Yesterday, the five MESC BioCell Habitats were placed into Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL)1 for temperature control until CO2 incubator was installed in SABL2 and checked out.  Early today the BioCell habitats were moved to SABL2.  Shortly after the transfer, ground teams noticed that SABL2 had slightly higher CO2 levels. The calibration constants were updated and SABL2 is now operating within nominal limits.  The crew has transferred the BioCells to the microscope to image the cells and capture points of interest to payload developers.  Once imaging was completed the BioCell habitats were returned to SABL2.  MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

SpaceX-10 (SpX-10) Dragon Cargo Operations: Today, the crew continued unpacking the vehicle and stowing items on ISS. They completed approximately 4.75 hours of cargo operations this morning.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Today, Ground Controllers will configure the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) for external Dragon cargo operations. They will unstow Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and setup for Space Test Program-H5 (STP-H5) extraction from the Dragon trunk. They also will perform a Dragon Trunk Camera checkout and Dragon Trunk cargo survey.

Ku-Band Telemetry Loss – The Joint Station Lan 2 (JSL2) forward and return links were lost this morning. Ground teams attempted to power cycle the Network (N2) Card twice with no joy, which lead to the conclusion that the Ku Communications Unit 1 (KCU1) could not be commanded.  Extended telemetry was lost as well. The ground was still receiving video and Space to Ground (S/G) audio downlinks 3 and 4, however they were unable to make any changes to them.  The entire Integrated Communications Unit (ICU) was power cycled. Ku Communications Unit 1 (KCU1) was restored and is working nominally and Ku-Band functionality, including video and voice, was restored.  However the Ku IP services through JSL2 were not recovered and Payload Developers (PDs) reported they were unable to send commands.  The JSL2 forward link issue appears to be ground based and teams are still evaluating.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #153 on: 02/28/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/27/2017

Posted on February 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research-4 (RR-4) Transfer Operations: Saturday, the crew reported all of the animals were successfully transferred them from the SpX-10 transporters to the four Rodent Research Habitats on the ISS. Sunday, the crew cleaned and stowed the transporters. The Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (RR-4) studies what prevents vertebrates such as rodents and humans from regrowing lost bone and tissue, and how the microgravity extraterrestrial condition impacts the process. Results could lead to tissue regeneration efforts in space and a better understanding of limitations of limb regrowth at wound sites.

Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) Microscope Operations: The crew continued with MESC operations over the weekend, Saturday, the crew removed the BioCells from Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory-2 (SABL2) and with ground team support imaged the BioCells to capture points of interest to the payload developers.  Both crew and ground teams reported seeing 3D cell structures which are not seen in 1G. The imaged BioCells were then returned to SABL2. Sunday, the crew fixed one of two imaging cells, sampled and preserved four BioCells, preserved two BioCells, and inserted seven BioCells into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for cold stowage.  Today, the crew repeated the fixing sampling, preserving and cold stowage insertion for another set of sample BioCells. MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

Advanced Plant Experiments (APEX)-04: Saturday, the crew reviewed procedures then retrieved and transferred the APEX-04 samples from Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) to the Veggie facility.  The 27 APEX-04 petri plates were installed to begin the grow-out of the Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Sunday, the crew photographed a petri plate and reported condensation.  Ground teams will review the images and determine if a different plate will be used as a representative sample as only one plate is imaged at a time; small disturbances of as little as 20-30 seconds of movement from Veggie to the Maintenance Work Area (MWA) can change the growth of the plants. The APEX-04 (Epigenetic change in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to spaceflight – differential cytosine DNA methylation of plants on the ISS) experiment investigates how spaceflight can affect an organism on a molecular level without altering its outward appearance. Previous research has demonstrated that large numbers of plant genes are expressed differently in space compared to plants on Earth, which can alter how plants grow. This investigation studies the entire genome of thale cress plants grown in space, creating maps of spaceflight-specific changes in certain groups of genes. Results give new insight into plants’ molecular responses to spaceflight, which benefits efforts to grow plants in space for food and oxygen.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics-1: On Sunday, the crew retrieved the LMM Biophysics-1 (The Effect of Macromolecular Transport of Microgravity Protein Crystallization) sample from the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI), allowed it to thaw, and inserted it into the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR).  The LMM Biophysics-1 investigation improves understanding of the physical processes that enable high-quality crystals to grow in space, where Earth’s gravity does not interfere with their formation.

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Depress: The crew depressed the airlock then vented the remaining air prior to the deployment of NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD)-10 early next week.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew performed their FMS sessions this morning. The FMS experiment is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the crew performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Sunday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers unstowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF).  They then maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM to a translate configuration and translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite #6 (WS6) to WS7.  Since they were ahead of schedule, the Robotics Ground Controllers also performed part of today’s operations, maneuvering the SSRMS and SPDM as required to use SPDM Arm1 to remove the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) from EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistics Carrier 1 (ELC1).  MSS performance was nominal.  Monday night Robotic Ground Controllers will extract OPALS from ELC-1 Site 8 and install on SPDM EOTP Side 2.

Treadmill (T)2 Maintenance:  The crew completed the 6-month T2 inspection. During this task the crew inspected the treadbelt slats and screws, cleaned the treadmill drive shaft, greased forward and rear axles, vacuumed inside the rack and around the treadmill, and inspected the bungee shackle key mount witness mark.  This is nominal periodic corrective maintenance.  Following the inspection, there was a checkout session prior to authorizing T2 for nominal use.

Dragon Cargo Operations:  Crew completed unloading the Dragon vehicle on Saturday.  Instructions for loading cargo for return will be uplinked to the crew later this week.

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Maintenance:  Today the crew reviewed procedures and gathered some of the necessary tools and materials to perform a week’s worth of CDRA maintenance.  Over the next three days the crew will remove the old beds from Lab CDRA and replace them with the newer generation beds, like those in Node 3 CDRA.  This involves removing Lab CDRA from the LAB1D6 Air Revitalization (AR) Rack, disassembling it by removing all of the valves and ducting to access the beds, R&Ring the beds, reassembling CDRA, and reinstalling it in the Rack.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #154 on: 02/28/2017 09:37 PM »
As we're now in March (well, some of us are), just FYI: The PMA-3 relocation from Node 3 Port to Node 2 Zenith is coming up around 10th March.

There's also a US EVA coming up around the first week of March, to prep PMA-3 for removal, install some EPIC EXT MDMs (Enhanced Processor & Integrated Communications External Multiplexer/Demultiplexers), and do some SPDM maintenance.

There will also be a US EVA around the second week of March, to do some post PMA-3 relo work, and more EPIC work.

Finally, there will be a US EVA around the third/fourth week of March, to do some work related to an ExPCA (ExPrESS Carrier Avionics) on one of the ELCs.
« Last Edit: 02/28/2017 09:39 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #155 on: 03/01/2017 09:09 AM »
February 28, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-025

Houston Students to Speak to NASA Astronaut on International Space Station


Students from Hartsfield Elementary 4-H Club of the Houston Independent School District in Texas will speak with a NASA astronaut currently living and working aboard the International Space Station at 10 a.m. EST Friday, March 3. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will answer questions from students assembled on the campus of the Animal and Environmental Sciences Magnet at Hartsfield Elementary. Whitson launched to the space station on Nov. 17, 2016.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Ashley Anthony at aanthon3@houstonisd.org. Hartsfield Elementary is at 5001 Perry St. in Houston.

Expeditionary Skills for Life, a NASA and 4-H partnership, highlights important skills including teamwork, cultural competency, leadership, followship and communication. The program is designed to take participants through educational expeditions that will help them learn and practice skills that can be applied to almost every aspect of life. Whitson, a 4-H alumna, has played a major role in this partnership.

This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of the NASA Office of Education’s efforts to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning in the United States. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station through the agency Office of Education’s STEM on Station activity provides authentic, live experiences in space exploration, space study and the scientific components of space travel, while introducing the possibilities of life in space.

Find out more about the NASA/4-H partnership at:

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/expeditionary-skills-for-life.html

Get NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Learn about videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

http://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #156 on: 03/01/2017 01:53 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/28/2017

Posted on February 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Maintenance: The adsorbent material (Zeolite) inside the CDRA beds breaks down over time and creates dust.  This dust eventually reduces airflow through the beds to the point where CDRA can no longer operate.  The Node 3 CDRA has newer generation beds that can be disassembled and serviced on orbit.  The Lab CDRA, however, still has older generation beds that cannot be serviced on orbit and are near end of life.  Today, the crew removed Lab CDRA from the rack, and disassembled it by removing all of the valves and ducting to access the beds. During the removal of the CDRA from the rack, the original power cable (P12) that connects the ASVs to the Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) was left mated in one location and the cable was severed. Teams are looking into the issue. The crew also removed the old beds from Lab CDRA. Lab CDRA will be left in this configuration overnight. Tomorrow, the crew will replace the beds with the newer generation beds, like those in Node 3 CDRA.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Suit Maintenance: The crew performed routine maintenance tasks on EMU 3003 and EMU 3010 including a loop scrub, a post-loop scrub water sample, suit and ion filter iodination and an EMU conductivity test.

Rodent Research Status Check: This morning, the crew conducted a conference with ground teams then collected necessary equipment for tomorrow’s Habitat Restocking activities. The Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (RR-4) studies what prevents vertebrates such as rodents and humans from regrowing lost bone and tissue, and how the microgravity extraterrestrial condition impacts the process. Results could lead to tissue regeneration efforts in space and a better understanding of limitations of limb regrowth at wound sites.

Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) Microscope Operations: The crew removed a BioCell from the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory-2 (SABL2) and placed it on the microscope stage configured outside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The crew worked with ground specialist to image areas of the BioCell plate.  Following the focused imaging, the crew reinserted the BioCell back into the SABL. MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to stow the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) on the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP).  They then handed the Space Test Program – Houston 5 (STP-H5) payload from SPDM Arm 2 to Arm 1.  This was done to switch from having Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 2 (OTCM2) providing keep alive power to the STP-H5 to having OTCM1 grasping the STP-H5 Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) so that the STP-H5 could be installed on EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistics Carrier 1 (ELC1).  After the STP-H5 had been installed, the SSRMS and SPDM were maneuvered to a Mobile Transporter (MT) translation configuration.  MSS performance was nominal.

Space Test Program – Houston 5 (STP-H5) Activation:  The STP-H5 payload was installed on ELC-1 and successfully activated, one day earlier than originally planned.  Initial data indicates that the STP-H5 equipment is healthy.  Activation of individual experiment packages is ongoing. STP-H5 is an EXpedite PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Pallet Adapter Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (ExPA-FRAM) based payload consisting of 13 individual experiments ranging from technology demonstrations to space and terrestrial weather measuring and monitoring.  The experiments are provided and operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA agencies.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #157 on: 03/02/2017 06:55 AM »
March 01, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-024

NASA Acting Administrator, U.S. Chamber of Commerce to Speak to Astronauts Aboard International Space Station


During an annual U.S. Chamber of Commerce conference in Washington, NASA acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot will moderate a discussion with NASA astronauts currently living and working aboard the International Space Station at 11:05 a.m. EST Thursday, March 2. The 20-minute, Earth-to-Space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 50 Commander Shane Kimbrough and Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson will answer questions from participants in the Chamber of Commerce’s 16th Annual Aviation Summit. Canadian Minister of Transport Marc Garneau and Chamber representative Carol Hallett will join Lightfoot for the question-and-answer session. More than 600 industry leaders are expected to be in attendance.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Stacy Day at 202-463-5682 or via email at press@uschamber.com. The conference will be held at the Omni Shoreham Hotel at 2500 Calvert St. Northwest in Washington.

Kimbrough launched to the station Oct. 19, 2016, and is scheduled to return to Earth April 10. Whitson launched Nov. 17, 2016.

For more than 16 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the International Space Station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 200 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 1,900 research investigations from researchers in more than 95 countries.

Keep up with the International Space Station, and its research and crews, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Get NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #158 on: 03/03/2017 07:25 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/01/2017

Posted on March 1, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Maintenance:  Yesterday the crew removed Lab CDRA from the rack, and disassemble it by removing all of the valves and ducting to access the beds. They also removed the old beds. Today, the crew installed the newer generation beds, like those in Node 3 CDRA, mated Hydraflow Couplings, and electrical connectors.  The crew is scheduled to reinstall the Lab CDRA on Thursday.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Microbe Sensor Installation: The crew installed the JEM Microbe Sensor at the Deck 7 location in the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM). They connected the power cable to the JEM Power Supply-120 (PS-120) Junction Box, and connected the Ethernet Cable JEM Ethernet Hub. Microbe Sensor visualizes airborne microbe of JPM. The Microbe Sensor will monitor the JPM cabin environment real time, instead of sample collect and return to ground, which will allow quick feedback on the quality of the cabin environment.

JEM Local Area Network (LAN) Monitor Installation: Today, the crew installed three JEM LAN Monitors and connected the JEM LAN Monitor Pwr Cable, LAN Cables (one each) and two Universal Serial Bus (USB) Memories. The JEM LAN Monitor will serve as an ethernet packet capture device on the JEM PL LAN. This device will introduce new capabilities to monitor, analyze, troubleshoot network issues over the JEM PL LAN. Once the JEM LAN Monitor is installed, crew time for the troubleshooting is expected to be saved.

JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST) 2 Installation: The crew installed the second FROST in the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM). FROST was delivered over two flights, SpaceX-10 and HTV-6 and will deliver conditioned stowage capability.  The next planned use of FROST2 is for the Moderate Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (MT PCG) experiment scheduled to fly on SpX-11.

Rodent Research (RR) Habitat Restock: The crew restocked the four habitats today.  The habitats were emptied, cleaned, and new food bars installed.  The rodents were then transferred back into the habitats and then secured the habitats back into their individual stowage locations. The Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (RR-4) investigation studies what prevents vertebrates such as rodents and humans from regrowing lost bone and tissue, and how the microgravity extraterrestrial condition impacts the process. Results could lead to tissue regeneration efforts in space and a better understanding of limitations of limb regrowth at wound sites.

Astronaut Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): The crew started Energy Day 0 today. The subject donned an armband monitor, set up the Pulmonary Function System (PFS) hardware, and started to eat a controlled diet. For this part of the investigation, additionally, a control subject participated as well, with both crewmembers collecting urine samples at approximately the same time over the next 11 days (Day 0 through Day 10).  Energy measures change in energy balance in crewmembers following long term space flight. Energy also measures adaptations in the components of total energy expenditure of crewmembers, so that an equation to determine the energy requirements of crewmembers during space flight may be derived. Such knowledge of energy requirements is of a great importance to ensure health, good performance and the overall success of a mission, and also contributes to ensure adequate exercise load and cargo allotments for food during space flight.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Last night the Robotics Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 7 (WS7) to WS6.  The MSS was subsequently powered up and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) were maneuvered to stow the SPDM on the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF).  The SSRMS was then walked off Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF4 onto the Node 2 PDGF and the SSRMS was maneuvered to unstow the SPDM.  Finally SPDM Arm2 rotated the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) thus completing the MSS reconfiguration required for the start of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) Instrument Panel (IP) extraction from the SpX-10 Dragon Trunk on 02 Mar 17.  MSS performance was nominal.

ISS Reboost:  Overnight the ISS is scheduled to perform a reboost using the SM main engines at 3:10 GMT (21:10 CST).  The purpose of the reboost is to set up the planned conditions for the upcoming landing of 48S on April 10th and launch of 50S on April 20th.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #159 on: 03/04/2017 08:37 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/02/2017

Posted on March 2, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Maintenance:  Yesterday the crew installed the newer generation beds, like those in Node 3 CDRA, into Lab CDRA. Today, the crew repaired the CDRA Valve Power Cable W9P12 by splicing in two new wire segments and performing a 120V power check of the connector prior to installing CDRA into the LAB AR Rack.  Initial CDRA power and data checkout was nominal.  The full Lab CDRA checkout is in work.

Pressurized Mating Adaptor (PMA) 3 Ingress Prep:  The crew is scheduled to ingress the PMA3 tomorrow morning.  Today the crew reviewed the PMA3 ingress procedure and gathered required hardware for tomorrow’s activities. 

Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today is Day 1 for the Energy investigation; yesterday the subject began the 11 day diet and today began the urine collection for both the subject and control subject.  This morning, the subject configured the Pulmonary Function System (PFS) and performed a series of Oxygen Uptake Measurements (OUMs) after prescribed meals and scheduled fluid collections.  The Energy investigation measures adaptations in the components of total energy expenditure of crewmembers, so that an equation to determine the energy requirements of crewmembers during space flight may be derived. Such knowledge of energy requirements is of a great importance to ensure health, good performance and the overall success of a mission, and also contributes to ensure adequate exercise load and cargo allotments for food during space flight.

Advanced Plant Experiments (APEX)-04 Photo: The crew retrieved one of the APEX-04 petri plates and photographed it on the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photogrid. The picture will be downlinked for ground teams to evaluate the growth status. The APEX-04 (Epigenetic change in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to spaceflight – differential cytosine DNA methylation of plants on the ISS) experiment investigates how spaceflight can affect an organism on a molecular level without altering its outward appearance. Previous research has demonstrated that large numbers of plant genes are expressed differently in space compared to plants on Earth, which can alter how plants grow. This investigation studies the entire genome of thale cress plants grown in space, creating maps of spaceflight-specific changes in certain groups of genes. Results give new insight into plants’ molecular responses to spaceflight, which benefits efforts to grow plants in space for food and oxygen.

Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells (MESC) Microscope Operations: The crew removed a BioCell from the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory-2 (SABL2) and placed it on the microscope stage configured outside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The crew worked with ground specialist to image areas of the BioCell plate.  Following the focused imaging, the crew reinserted the BioCell back into the SABL. MESC will aid researches determine the efficiency of using a microgravity environment to accelerate expansion (replication) of stem cells for use in terrestrial clinical trials for treatment of disease.

ISS Reboost:  Last night the ISS performed a nominal reboost using the SM main engines, TIG 061/03:10 GMT burn duration 43 seconds.  The reboost set up the planned conditions for the upcoming landing of 48S on 10-April and launch of 50S on 20-April 20.  The 50S launch will utilize the 4-orbit rendezvous.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Robotics operations for Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) Instrument Panel (IP) extraction from the SpX-10 Dragon Trunk have begun. 

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