Author Topic: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates  (Read 76019 times)

Offline rfoshaug

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #20 on: 02/12/2010 07:21 PM »
My humble tribute to the Voyager probes:




Video by NASA, music composed by yours truly.  ;)
« Last Edit: 02/12/2010 07:25 PM by rfoshaug »

Offline luke strawwalker

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #21 on: 02/20/2010 03:46 AM »
My humble tribute to the Voyager probes:




Video by NASA, music composed by yours truly.  ;)


Hey, man, that's an AMAZING video... you've got SKILLS! 

KUTGW!  OL JR :)
NO plan IS the plan...

"His plan had no goals, no timeline, and no budgetary guidelines. Just maybe's, pretty speeches, and smokescreens."

Offline rfoshaug

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #22 on: 02/28/2010 10:42 PM »
Thank you! :)

Offline SirThoreth

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #23 on: 03/23/2010 07:15 PM »
The thing that always amazes me is that the Voyager probes aren't just still in communications with us here on Earth, but that they're still returning useful science, allowing us to make new discoveries.  Example from the end of December ('09):

Voyager makes an Interstellar Discovery

Summary:  the Voyager probes are returning information on the Local Interstellar Cloud, why it hasn't collapsed as a result of pressures on it from supernovae, and what's going to happen as the solar system impacts the next interstellar cloud (ie. it'll compress the heliosheath, allowing more cosmic rays into the solar system).

That's...pretty impressive stuff for a pair of space probes launched more than three decades ago.

« Last Edit: 03/23/2010 07:16 PM by SirThoreth »

Offline HIPAR

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #24 on: 05/12/2010 01:38 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1005/11voyager2/

It's got to be mighty lonely way out there.

---  CHAS

Offline mikegi

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #25 on: 05/13/2010 01:52 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:
Easy, have Voyager download and install Service Pack 43 then reboot! They might want to get the latest antivirus definition files while they're at it.

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.

Offline HIPAR

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #26 on: 05/13/2010 03:07 PM »

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.

Yes, I have thought about that.  How many of the original project people are available for consultation?

---  CHAS

Offline nooneofconsequence

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #27 on: 05/19/2010 04:13 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:
Easy, have Voyager download and install Service Pack 43 then reboot! They might want to get the latest antivirus definition files while they're at it.

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.
Thankfully there are software emulators - you don't need the hardware.
"Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something" - Plato

Offline Sparky

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #28 on: 05/19/2010 04:51 AM »
Is there a chance that this could be a result of the spacecraft being exposed to cosmic radiation after crossing the Termination Shock?

Online eeergo

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #29 on: 05/19/2010 06:39 AM »
The cause appears to be, according to all available simulations and data, a flipped bit in the data formatting system (probably a cosmic ray trigger event, not necessarily caused by the area Voyager is currently in)

http://jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-151

Reversal of that bit to its normal state is planned for today.
-DaviD-

Offline HIPAR

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #30 on: 05/28/2010 02:12 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #31 on: 05/28/2010 02:39 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Great job! Is there anyone here on the team?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Offline edkyle99

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #32 on: 05/28/2010 05:22 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Yes, but do they do service calls for computers built during the mid 1970s?  :)

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 05/28/2010 05:22 AM by edkyle99 »

Offline Downix

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #33 on: 05/28/2010 01:39 PM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Yes, but do they do service calls for computers built during the mid 1970s?  :)

 - Ed Kyle
Yes, yes we do.

(oldest one to-date was from 1968, a "Tiger" whatever that was, never heard of it till the day we had to fix it)
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #34 on: 11/12/2010 03:56 AM »
Saturn Then and Now: 30 Years Since Voyager Visit

 

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-381&cid=release_2010-381



Ed Stone, project scientist for NASA's Voyager mission, remembers the first time he saw the kinks in one of Saturn's narrowest rings. It was the day the Voyager 1 spacecraft made its closest approach to the giant ringed planet, 30 years ago. Scientists were gathering in front of television monitors and in one another's offices every day during this heady period to pore over the bewildering images and other data streaming down to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

Stone drew a crude sketch of this scalloped, multi-stranded ring, known as the F ring, in his notebook, but with no explanation next to it. The innumerable particles comprising the broad rings are in near-circular orbits about Saturn. So, it was a surprise to find that the F ring, discovered just a year before by NASA's Pioneer 11 spacecraft, had clumps and wayward kinks. What could have created such a pattern?

"It was clear Voyager was showing us something different at Saturn," said Stone, now based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "Over and over, the spacecraft revealed so many unexpected things that it often took days, months and even years to figure them out."

The F ring curiosity was only one of many strange phenomena discovered in the Voyager close encounters with Saturn, which occurred on Nov. 12, 1980, for Voyager 1, and Aug. 25, 1981, for Voyager 2. The Voyager encounters were responsible for finding six small moons and revealing the half-young, half-old terrain of Enceladus that had to point to some kind of geological activity.

Images from the two encounters also exposed individual storms roiling the planet's atmosphere, which did not show up at all in data from Earth-based telescopes. Scientists used Voyager data to resolve a debate about whether Titan had a thick or thin atmosphere, finding that Titan was shrouded in a thick haze of hydrocarbons in a nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The finding led scientists to predict there could be seas of liquid methane and ethane on Titan's surface.

"When I look back, I realize how little we actually knew about the solar system before Voyager," Stone added. "We discovered things we didn't know were there to be discovered, time after time."

In fact, the Voyager encounters sparked so many new questions that another spacecraft, NASA's Cassini, was sent to probe those mysteries. While Voyager 1 got to within about 126,000 kilometers (78,300 miles) above Saturn's cloud tops, and Voyager 2 approached as close as about 100,800 kilometers (62,600 miles), Cassini has dipped to this altitude and somewhat lower in its orbits around Saturn since 2004.

Because of Cassini's extended journey around Saturn, scientists have found explanations for many of the mysteries first seen by Voyager. Cassini has uncovered a mechanism to explain the new terrain on Enceladus tiger stripe fissures with jets of water vapor and organic particles. It revealed that Titan indeed does have stable lakes of liquid hydrocarbons on its surface and showed just how similar to Earth that moon really is. Data from Cassini have also resolved how two small moons discovered by Voyager Prometheus and Pandora tug on the F ring to create its kinked shape and wakes that form snowballs.

"Cassini is indebted to Voyager for its many fascinating discoveries and for paving the way for Cassini," said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at JPL, who started her career working on Voyager from 1977 to 1989. "On Cassini, we still compare our data to Voyager's and proudly build on Voyager's heritage."

But Voyager left a few mysteries that Cassini has not yet solved. For instance, scientists first spotted a hexagonal weather pattern when they stitched together Voyager images of Saturn's north pole. Cassini has obtained higher-resolution pictures of the hexagon which tells scientists it's a remarkably stable wave in one of the jet streams that remains 30 years later but scientists are still not sure what forces maintain the hexagon.

Even more perplexing are the somewhat wedge-shaped, transient clouds of tiny particles that Voyager discovered orbiting in Saturn's B ring. Scientists dubbed them "spokes" because they looked like bicycle spokes. Cassini scientists have been searching for them since the spacecraft first arrived. As Saturn approached equinox, and the sun's light hit the rings edge-on, the spokes did reappear in the outer part of Saturn's B ring. But Cassini scientists are still testing their theories of what might be causing these odd features.

"The fact that we still have mysteries today goes to show how much we still have to learn about our solar system," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager's project manager, based at JPL. "Today, the Voyager spacecraft continue as pioneers traveling toward the edge of our solar system. We can't wait for the Voyager spacecraft to enter interstellar space true outer space and make more unexpected discoveries."

Voyager 1, which was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, is currently about 17 billion kilometers (11 billion miles) away from the sun. It is the most distant spacecraft. Voyager 2, which was launched on Aug. 20, 1977, is currently about 14 billion kilometers (9 billion miles) away from the sun.

The Voyagers were built by JPL, which continues to operate both spacecraft. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL manages Cassini for NASA. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

More Voyager information is available at http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov .

More Cassini information is available at http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .


 

Offline bolun

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #35 on: 12/14/2010 10:29 AM »
Voyager near Solar System's edge

14 December 2010

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, has reached a new milestone in its quest to leave the Solar System.

Now 17.4bn km (10.8bn miles) from home, the veteran probe has detected a distinct change in the flow of particles that surround it.

These particles, which emanate from the Sun, are no longer travelling outwards but are moving sideways.

It means Voyager must be very close to making the jump to interstellar space - the space between the stars.

This phenomenon is a consequence of the wind pushing up against the matter coming from other stars. The boundary between the two is the "official" edge of the Solar System - the heliopause. Once Voyager crosses over, it will be in interstellar space.

Voyager 1 is racing on towards the heliopause at 17km/s. Dr Stone expects the cross-over to occur within the next few years.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11988466
« Last Edit: 12/20/2010 12:38 PM by bolun »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #36 on: 01/21/2011 06:22 PM »
Jan. 21, 2010

Voyager Celebrates 25 Years Since Uranus Visit

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-023&cid=release_2011-023

As NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft made the only close approach to date of our mysterious seventh planet Uranus 25 years ago, Project Scientist Ed Stone and the Voyager team gathered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., to pore over the data coming in.

Images of the small, icy Uranus moon Miranda were particularly surprising. Since small moons tend to cool and freeze over rapidly after their formation, scientists had expected a boring, ancient surface, pockmarked by crater-upon-weathered-crater. Instead they saw grooved terrain with linear valleys and ridges cutting through the older terrain and sometimes coming together in chevron shapes. They also saw dramatic fault scarps, or cliffs. All of this indicated that periods of tectonic and thermal activity had rocked Miranda's surface in the past.

The scientists were also shocked by data showing that Uranus's magnetic north and south poles were not closely aligned with the north-south axis of the planet's rotation. Instead, the planet's magnetic field poles were closer to the Uranian equator. This suggested that the material flows in the planet's interior that are generating the magnetic field are closer to the surface of Uranus than the flows inside Earth, Jupiter and Saturn are to their respective surfaces.

"Voyager 2's visit to Uranus expanded our knowledge of the unexpected diversity of bodies that share the solar system with Earth," said Stone, who is based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "Even though similar in many ways, the worlds we encounter can still surprise us."

Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977, 16 days before its twin, Voyager 1. After completing its prime mission of flying by Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 2 was sent on the right flight path to visit Uranus, which is about 3 billion kilometers (2 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 2 made its closest approach within 81,500 kilometers (50,600 miles) of the Uranian cloud tops on Jan. 24, 1986.

Before Voyager 2's visit, scientists had to learn about Uranus by using Earth-based and airborne telescopes. By observing dips in starlight as a star passed behind Uranus, scientists knew Uranus had nine narrow rings. But it wasn't until the Voyager 2 flyby that scientists were able to capture for the first time images of the rings and the tiny shepherding moons that sculpted them. Unlike Saturn's icy rings, they found Uranus' rings to be dark gray, reflecting only a few percent of the incident sunlight.

Scientists had also determined an average temperature for Uranus (59 Kelvin, or minus 350 degrees Fahrenheit) before this encounter, but the distribution of that temperature came as a surprise. Voyager showed there was heat transport from pole to pole in Uranus' atmosphere that maintained the same temperature at both poles, even though the sun was shining directly for decades on one pole and not the other.

By the end of the Uranus encounter and science analysis, data from Voyager 2 enabled the discovery of 11 new moons and two new rings, and generated dozens of science papers about the quirky seventh planet.

Voyager 2 moved on to explore Neptune, the last planetary target, in August 1989. It is now hurtling toward interstellar space, which is the space between stars. It is about 14 billion kilometers (9 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 1, which explored only Jupiter and Saturn before heading on a faster track toward interstellar space, is about 17 billion kilometers (11 billion miles) away from the sun.

"The Uranus encounter was one of a kind," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager, based at JPL. "Voyager 2 was healthy and durable enough to make it to Uranus and then to Neptune. Currently both Voyager spacecraft are on the cusp of leaving the sun's sphere of influence and once again blazing a trail of scientific discovery."

The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager . JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #37 on: 03/09/2011 03:15 PM »
News release: 2011-069                                                                     March 8, 2011

Voyager Seeks the Answer Blowin' in the Wind

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-069&cid=release_2011-069

PASADENA, Calif. -- In which direction is the sun's stream of charged particles banking when it nears the edge of the solar system? The answer, scientists know, is blowing in the wind. It's just a matter of getting NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in the right orientation to detect it.

To enable Voyager 1's Low Energy Charged Particle instrument to gather these data, the spacecraft performed a maneuver on March 7 that it hadn't done for 21 years, except in a preparatory test last month.

At 9:10 a.m. PST (12:10 p.m. EST), humanity's most distant spacecraft rolled 70 degrees counterclockwise as seen from Earth from its normal orientation and held the position by spinning gyroscopes for two hours, 33 minutes. The last time either of the two Voyager spacecraft rolled and stopped in a gyro-controlled orientation was Feb. 14, 1990, when Voyager 1 snapped a family portrait of the planets strewn like tiny gems around our sun (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00451).

"Even though Voyager 1 has been traveling through the solar system for 33 years, it is still a limber enough gymnast to do acrobatics we haven't asked it to do in 21 years," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "It executed the maneuver without a hitch, and we look forward to doing it a few more times to allow the scientists to gather the data they need."

The two Voyager spacecraft are traveling through a turbulent area known as the heliosheath. The heliosheath is the outer shell of a bubble around our solar system created by the solar wind, a stream of ions blowing radially outward from the sun at a million miles per hour. The wind must turn as it approaches the outer edge of the bubble where it makes contact with the interstellar wind, which originates in the region between stars and blows by our solar bubble.

In June 2010, when Voyager 1 was about 17 billion kilometers (about 11 billion miles) away from the sun, data from the Low Energy Charged Particle instrument began to show that the net outward flow of the solar wind was zero. That zero reading has continued since. The Voyager science team doesn't think the wind has disappeared in that area. It has likely just turned a corner. But does it go up, down or to the side?

"Because the direction of the solar wind has changed and its radial speed has dropped to zero, we have to change the orientation of Voyager 1 so the Low Energy Charged Particle instrument can act like a kind of weather vane to see which way the wind is now blowing," said Edward Stone, Voyager project manager, based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. "Knowing the strength and direction of the wind is critical to understanding the shape of our solar bubble and estimating how much farther it is to the edge of interstellar space."
Voyager engineers performed a test roll and hold on Feb. 2 for two hours, 15 minutes. When data from Voyager 1 were received on Earth some 16 hours later, the mission team verified the test was successful and the spacecraft had no problem in reorienting itself and locking back onto its guide star, Alpha Centauri.

The Low Energy Charged Particle instrument science team confirmed that the spacecraft had acquired the kind of information it needed, and mission planners gave Voyager 1 the green light to do more rolls and longer holds. There will be five more of these maneuvers over the next seven days, with the longest hold lasting three hours 50 minutes. The Voyager team plans to execute a series of weekly rolls for this purpose every three months.

The success of the March 7 roll and hold was received at JPL at 1:21 a.m. PST (4:21 a.m. EST) on March 8. But it will take a few months longer for scientists to analyze the data.
"We do whatever we can to make sure the scientists get exactly the kinds of data they need, because only the Voyager spacecraft are still active in this exotic region of space," said Jefferson Hall, Voyager mission operations manager at JPL. "We were delighted to see Voyager still has the capability to acquire unique science data in an area that won't likely be traveled by other spacecraft for decades to come."

Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977. Voyager 1 was launched on Sept. 5, 1977. On March 7, Voyager 1 was 17.4 billion kilometers (10.8 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 2 was 14.2 billion kilometers (8.8 billion miles) away from the sun, on a different trajectory.

The solar wind's outward flow has not yet diminished to zero where Voyager 2 is exploring, but that may happen as the spacecraft approaches the edge of the bubble in the years ahead.

The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate. For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager.


Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #38 on: 04/22/2011 06:52 AM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-084

NASA INVITES PUBLIC TO TAKE A JOURNEY TOWARD INTERSTELLAR SPACE

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a special Science Update at 1 p.m. EDT on
Thursday, April 28, to discuss the unprecedented journey of NASA's
twin Voyager spacecraft to the edge of our solar system.

The event will be held in NASA headquarters' Webb auditorium at 300 E
St. SW, in Washington. It will be broadcast live on NASA Television
and streamed at:


http://www.nasa.gov   


After 33 years in space, the spacecraft still are operating and
returning data from about 10 billion miles away from our sun. The
Voyagers also carry a collection of images and sounds from Earth as a
message to possible life elsewhere in the galaxy.

The participants are:
-- Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist and professor of physics,
California Institute of Technology
-- Ann Druyan, creative director, Voyager Interstellar Message
Project; Carl Sagan's co-author and widow
-- Suzanne Dodd, Voyager Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
Pasadena, Calif.
-- Merav Opher, Voyager Guest Investigator and assistant professor of
astronomy, Boston University

Reporters also may ask questions from participating NASA field centers
or by phone. Journalists must send their name, affiliation and
telephone number to Dwayne Brown at: dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov by noon
on Wednesday, April 27, for dial-in information.

For more information about the Voyager mission, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/voyager   


For NASA TV streaming video and downlink information, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/ntv   


-end-


Offline Robotbeat

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Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #39 on: 04/22/2011 09:28 PM »
It never ceases to amaze me that these two machines which were launched off of planet Earth before I was even born are still out there diligently sending back data, now out beyond the solar system tasting the edge of interstellar space... Mind-blowing.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

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