Author Topic: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates  (Read 78610 times)

Offline E_ E_ H

  • Fascinated
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 396
  • Southampton, UK
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« on: 08/20/2007 04:50 PM »
What an achievement. I have started this thread in "historical spaceflight", but I suppose it should be in current missions because they are still flying and transmitting data.

I've started this for people to pass comment. I thought that Carl Sagan said it best in 1996 when he said,

"We succeeded in taking that picture [from deep space], and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you know, everyone you love, everyone you've ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines. Every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there - on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us. It's been said that astronomy is a humbling, and I might add, a character-building experience. To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish this pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

The picture is a composite from Voyager 1 (NASA public domain).

What an astonishing achievement by mankind. I hope we follow up with more. I believe it is worth it.

Cheers.

Richard.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2010 07:06 PM by jacqmans »
Ground control to Major Chris....

Offline Analyst

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3337
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 1
RE: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #1 on: 08/20/2007 05:36 PM »
I love these birds. :) Their mission should only be terminated by degrading RTG power, not by funding decisions. If you think about redundancy and reliable systems design, this is it.

Analyst

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
RE: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #2 on: 08/20/2007 05:46 PM »
RELEASE: 07-205

PIONEERING NASA SPACECRAFT MARK THIRTY YEARS OF FLIGHT

WASHINGTON - NASA's two venerable Voyager spacecraft are celebrating
three decades of flight as they head toward interstellar space. Their
ongoing odysseys mark an unprecedented and historic accomplishment.

Voyager 2 launched on Aug. 20, 1977, and Voyager 1 launched on Sept.
5, 1977. They continue to return information from distances more than
three times farther away than Pluto.

"The Voyager mission is a legend in the annals of space exploration.
It opened our eyes to the scientific richness of the outer solar
system, and it has pioneered the deepest exploration of the sun's
domain ever conducted," said Alan Stern, associate administrator for
NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. "It's a testament to
Voyager's designers, builders and operators that both spacecraft
continue to deliver important findings more than 25 years after their
primary mission to Jupiter and Saturn concluded."

During their first dozen years of flight, the spacecraft made detailed
explorations of Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons, and conducted the
first explorations of Uranus and Neptune. These planets were
previously unknown worlds. The Voyagers returned never-before-seen
images and scientific data, making fundamental discoveries about the
outer planets and their moons. The spacecraft revealed Jupiter's
turbulent atmosphere, which includes dozens of interacting
hurricane-like storm systems, and erupting volcanoes on Jupiter's
moon Io. They also showed waves and fine structure in Saturn's icy
rings from the tugs of nearby moons.

For the past 19 years, the twin Voyagers have been probing the sun's
outer heliosphere and its boundary with interstellar space. Both
Voyagers remain healthy and are returning scientific data 30 years
after their launches.

Voyager 1 currently is the farthest human-made object at a distance
from the sun of about 9.7 billion miles. Voyager 2 is about 7.8
billion miles from the sun. Originally designed as a four-year
mission to Jupiter and Saturn, the Voyager tours were extended
because of their successful achievements and a rare planetary
alignment. The two-planet mission eventually became a four-planet
grand tour. After completing that extended mission, the two
spacecraft began the task of exploring the outer heliosphere.

"The Voyager mission has opened up our solar system in a way not
possible before the Space Age," said Edward Stone, Voyager project
scientist at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.
"It revealed our neighbors in the outer solar system and showed us
how much there is to learn and how diverse the bodies are that share
the solar system with our own planet Earth."

In December 2004, Voyager 1 began crossing the solar system's final
frontier. Called the heliosheath, this turbulent area, approximately
8.7 billion miles from the sun, is where the solar wind slows as it
crashes into the thin gas that fills the space between stars. Voyager
2 could reach this boundary later this year, putting both Voyagers on
their final leg toward interstellar space.

Each spacecraft carries five fully functioning science instruments
that study the solar wind, energetic particles, magnetic fields and
radio waves as they cruise through this unexplored region of deep
space. The spacecraft are too far from the sun to use solar power.
They run on less than 300 watts, the amount of power needed to light
up a bright light bulb. Their long-lived radioisotope thermoelectric
generators provide the power.

"The continued operation of these spacecraft and the flow of data to
the scientists is a testament to the skills and dedication of the
small operations team," said Ed Massey, Voyager project manager at
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Massey oversees
a team of nearly a dozen people in the day-to-day Voyager spacecraft
operations.

The Voyagers call home via NASA's Deep Space Network, a system of
antennas around the world. The spacecraft are so distant that
commands from Earth, traveling at light speed, take 14 hours one-way
to reach Voyager 1 and 12 hours to reach Voyager 2. Each Voyager logs
approximately 1 million miles per day.

Each of the Voyagers carries a golden record that is a time capsule
with greetings, images and sounds from Earth. The records also have
directions on how to find Earth if the spacecraft is recovered by
something or someone.

NASA's next outer planet exploration mission is New Horizons, which is
now well past Jupiter and headed for a historic exploration of the
Pluto system in July 2015.

For a complete listing of Voyager discoveries and mission information,
visit the Internet at:

http://www.nasa.gov/voyager

Offline brihath

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 864
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #3 on: 08/20/2007 05:50 PM »
Let's hear it for the RTG's that power these vehicles.  I know the ani-nuke crowd always get worked up about sending them up on a rocket, but they are safe and reliable.  As I recall, several other RTG powered experiments were eventually shut down for lack of funds.  If they keep providing good science, then keep the data coming.  What an awesome achievement!

Offline jmjawors

  • Old Skool Scratchin'
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 896
  • Saint Louis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #4 on: 08/20/2007 06:20 PM »
The Voyagers really hold a special place for me.  I was first old enough to understand what they were and what they were doing when Voyager 2 flew by Saturn and I've been hooked on astronomy (and later spaceflight itself) ever since.

I especially remember what passed as "NASA - TV" back in those days... seeing the images come onto the TV screen one by one just as the scientists at JPL did.  Total excitement.  

Here's to 30 more years!

*raises glass*
.:: Matt ::.

Online Kaputnik

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
  • Liked: 445
  • Likes Given: 375
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #5 on: 08/20/2007 09:11 PM »
I think the Neptune encounter is one of my most vivid early childhood memories- we had no VCR so if I wanted to see anything about Voyager on the TV, I had to make sure I was there with my Dad watching it. I got caught up in all the excitement and I think I've been hooked ever since!
Maybe my own kids will have New Horizons as their own deep-space craft?
Waiting for joy and raptor

Offline Shadow Spork

  • Regular
  • Member
  • Posts: 90
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #6 on: 08/20/2007 09:25 PM »
I know that someday, we humans may be able to "fly-by" the Voyager probes as a nod to what we have accomplished. I'm glad these probes are still alive and ticking. :)

Offline wingod

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1305
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #7 on: 08/23/2007 02:42 AM »
Quote
Gary - 20/8/2007  4:15 PM

I remember the Saturn Encounter and just how amazing it was that these probes were that far out. They still amaze me to this day with just how much they have acomplished and how much we have learnt about the Solar System. I, for one, look forward to many more discoveres.

I was at the Pasadena CA civic center for the Planetfest celebration for the Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune encounters.  They were a LOT of fun and a total geekfest.

I will never forget the first images that came back from Saturn showing the twisted rings and hearing Carl Sagan exclaim "thats impossible!".


:)

Offline simonbp

Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #8 on: 08/23/2007 03:25 AM »
What's even more incredible is that Ed Stone has been PI for the mission continuously since 1972! I'm sure that's a record...

Simon ;)

Offline Lee Jay

  • Elite Veteran
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6639
  • Liked: 913
  • Likes Given: 137
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #9 on: 08/23/2007 03:37 AM »
While I'm sure the position didn't become formal until much later (and I don't know when), you could argue that Francis Everitt has been the PI on Gravity Probe B since 1962.

Offline mikeh

  • Regular
  • Member
  • Posts: 63
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #10 on: 08/23/2007 11:54 AM »
Let's not forget the people that run the deep space communications network.  Imagine the engineering that it takes to "talk and listen" to a spacecraft where the one way light time is 14 hours.  It doesn't matter if the probes last for another decade if you can't "talk" to them.  It's about the system not just the spacecraft.
===========================================
"You can't BS physics".

Don Arabian-Head of MER during Apollo

Offline E_ E_ H

  • Fascinated
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 396
  • Southampton, UK
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #11 on: 08/23/2007 12:29 PM »
I wonder how much interference will occur when Voyager 1 reaches the outer heliosphere.
Ground control to Major Chris....

Offline brahmanknight

  • I don't have all the right answers, but I do have all the right questions
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 686
  • Liked: 7
  • Likes Given: 94
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #12 on: 08/23/2007 02:13 PM »
Along with Challenger, one of my earliest space memories was the Neptune fly by.  And, yes, I remember how exciting it was for one image to download in about 20 seconds ( I get mad now if my laptop doesn't load a webpage in 3 seconds).  I couldn't fathom then or now how far that is out there, and how cold it is.  Just remarkable that they are even FARTHER out now.  Incredible.

Offline Andy USA

  • Lead Moderator
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 963
  • Los Angeles, California
  • Liked: 117
  • Likes Given: 79
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #13 on: 09/13/2007 12:03 AM »
Very special spacecrafts. Will they speed up or slow down when they breach the heliosphere?

Offline Maverick

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
  • Newcastle, England - UK
  • Liked: 10
  • Likes Given: 24
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #14 on: 09/17/2007 09:38 PM »
Quote
Andy USA - 12/9/2007  7:03 PM

Very special spacecrafts. Will they speed up or slow down when they breach the heliosphere?

I don't think anyone really knows. That's the cool mystery surrounding this.

Offline hmh33

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #15 on: 09/17/2007 09:57 PM »
I'm pretty sure the plasma densities involved are much too thin to actually decelerate the spacecraft.  So it will continue to experience the same (very weak, ~5E-7 m/s^2) deceleration because of the influence of the Sun's gravity as it does at present.
The plasma science instruments on board should notice changes though, which will be interesting.

Offline Moon King

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 46
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #16 on: 09/18/2007 01:37 AM »
They are slowing down??? So they will never really escape the sun's gravity? Could Voyager 1 and 2 eventually return to the inner solar system in several thousands of years?
NASA- Returning to the moon (when politicians quit slashing our budget)

Offline hmh33

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #17 on: 09/18/2007 05:15 AM »
Yes they are slowing down, but they will still escape the sun's gravity and never return.
The deceleration is a very small number and will continue to shrink.
Currently Voyager 1 is at a distance of about 103 AU from the Sun and is travelling at about 17km/s.  This is much more than solar escape velocity at that distance (4.1km/s) so we know it will escape.

The spacecraft's velocity relative to the sun is about 17000m/s.  The deceleration due to the sun's gravity at this distance is about 0.00000055m/s^2 so it loses 0.05m/s of velocity per day, or 18m/s per year.  After e.g. a year, it will have slowed by approximately 18m/s but it will also have travelled another 3.5 AU, the sun's gravity will be weaker and the deceleration will be less so over the following year its speed will decrease by only ~16m/s.

To correctly prove that it will escape you should use differential calculus (this is how you derive escape velocity) but hopefully you get the picture.


n.b. 1 AU is the radius of the Earth's orbit, about 150 million km or 93 million miles.

Offline Bruth

  • Member
  • Posts: 11
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Voyager 1 and 2: 30 years and still ticking.
« Reply #18 on: 10/16/2009 09:04 PM »
Yes, quite, that Golden Record on board should give any Intelligent Life that retrieves an indication as to the level of intelligence held by earthlings.
Bruth

As one astronomer put it: "To the Universe, stars and planets are minor impurities."

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #19 on: 02/12/2010 07:08 PM »
Feb. 12, 2010


Voyager Celebrates 20-Year-Old Valentine to Solar System

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-048&cid=release_2010-048


Twenty years ago on February 14, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft had sailed beyond the outermost planet in our solar system and turned its camera inward to snap a series of final images that would be its parting valentine to the string of planets it called home.

Mercury was too close to the sun to see, Mars showed only a thin crescent of sunlight, and Pluto was too dim, but Voyager was able to capture cameos of Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Earth and Venus from its unique vantage point. These images, later arranged in a large-scale mosaic, make up the only family portrait of our planets arrayed about the sun.

The Apollo missions in the 1960s and 70s had already altered our perspective of Earth by returning images of our home planet from the moon, but Voyager was providing a completely new perspective, said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

"It captured the Earth as a speck of light in the vastness of the solar system, which is our local neighborhood in the Milky Way galaxy, in a universe replete with galaxies," Stone said.

In the years since the twin Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977, they had already sent back breathtaking, groundbreaking pictures of the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. It took Voyager 1 more than 12 years to reach the place where it took the group portrait, 6 billion kilometers (almost 4 billion miles) away from the sun. The imaging team started snapping images of the outer planets first because they were worried that pointing the camera near the sun would blind it and prevent more picture-taking.

Candy Hansen, a planetary scientist based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., who worked with the Voyager imaging team at the time, remembers combing through the images and finally finding the image of Earth. She had seen so many pictures over the years that she could distinguish dust on the lens from the black dots imprinted on the lens for geometric correction.

There was our planet, a bright speck sitting in a kind of spotlight of sunlight scattered by the camera. Hansen still gets chills thinking about it.

"I was struck by how special Earth was, as I saw it shining in a ray of sunlight," she said. "It also made me think about how vulnerable our tiny planet is."

This was the image that inspired Carl Sagan, the the Voyager imaging team member who had suggested taking this portrait, to call our home planet "a pale blue dot."

As he wrote in a book by that name, "That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. … There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world."

After these images were taken, mission managers started powering down the cameras. The spacecraft weren't going to fly near anything else, and other instruments that were still collecting data needed power for the long journey to interstellar space that was ahead.

The Voyagers are still transmitting data daily back to Earth. Voyager 1 is now nearly 17 billion kilometers (more than 10 billion miles) away from the sun. The spacecraft have continued on to the next leg of their interstellar mission, closing in on the boundary of the bubble created by the sun that envelops all the planets. Scientists eagerly await the time when the Voyagers will leave that bubble and enter interstellar space.

"We were marveling at the vastness of space when this portrait was taken, but 20 years later, we're still inside the bubble," Stone said. "Voyager 1 may leave the solar bubble in five more years, but the family portrait gives you a sense of the scale of our neighborhood and that there is a great deal beyond it yet to be discovered."

The Voyagers were built by JPL, which continues to operate both spacecraft. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

Offline rfoshaug

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 241
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #20 on: 02/12/2010 07:21 PM »
My humble tribute to the Voyager probes:




Video by NASA, music composed by yours truly.  ;)
« Last Edit: 02/12/2010 07:25 PM by rfoshaug »

Offline luke strawwalker

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1032
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #21 on: 02/20/2010 03:46 AM »
My humble tribute to the Voyager probes:




Video by NASA, music composed by yours truly.  ;)


Hey, man, that's an AMAZING video... you've got SKILLS! 

KUTGW!  OL JR :)
NO plan IS the plan...

"His plan had no goals, no timeline, and no budgetary guidelines. Just maybe's, pretty speeches, and smokescreens."

Offline rfoshaug

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 241
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #22 on: 02/28/2010 10:42 PM »
Thank you! :)

Offline SirThoreth

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 52
  • San Diego, CA
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #23 on: 03/23/2010 07:15 PM »
The thing that always amazes me is that the Voyager probes aren't just still in communications with us here on Earth, but that they're still returning useful science, allowing us to make new discoveries.  Example from the end of December ('09):

Voyager makes an Interstellar Discovery

Summary:  the Voyager probes are returning information on the Local Interstellar Cloud, why it hasn't collapsed as a result of pressures on it from supernovae, and what's going to happen as the solar system impacts the next interstellar cloud (ie. it'll compress the heliosheath, allowing more cosmic rays into the solar system).

That's...pretty impressive stuff for a pair of space probes launched more than three decades ago.

« Last Edit: 03/23/2010 07:16 PM by SirThoreth »

Offline HIPAR

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 586
  • NE Pa (USA)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #24 on: 05/12/2010 01:38 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1005/11voyager2/

It's got to be mighty lonely way out there.

---  CHAS

Offline mikegi

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #25 on: 05/13/2010 01:52 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:
Easy, have Voyager download and install Service Pack 43 then reboot! They might want to get the latest antivirus definition files while they're at it.

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.

Offline HIPAR

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 586
  • NE Pa (USA)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #26 on: 05/13/2010 03:07 PM »

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.

Yes, I have thought about that.  How many of the original project people are available for consultation?

---  CHAS

Offline nooneofconsequence

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1391
  • no one is playing fair ...
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #27 on: 05/19/2010 04:13 AM »
Science data from Voyager 2 is garbled.  Maybe the problem can be fixed:
Easy, have Voyager download and install Service Pack 43 then reboot! They might want to get the latest antivirus definition files while they're at it.

Seriously, can you imagine trying to support such an old system? The original software tools are so out-of-date and I doubt there's hardware for testing.
Thankfully there are software emulators - you don't need the hardware.
"Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something" - Plato

Offline Sparky

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 378
  • Connecticut
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #28 on: 05/19/2010 04:51 AM »
Is there a chance that this could be a result of the spacecraft being exposed to cosmic radiation after crossing the Termination Shock?

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 425
  • Likes Given: 342
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #29 on: 05/19/2010 06:39 AM »
The cause appears to be, according to all available simulations and data, a flipped bit in the data formatting system (probably a cosmic ray trigger event, not necessarily caused by the area Voyager is currently in)

http://jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-151

Reversal of that bit to its normal state is planned for today.
-DaviD-

Offline HIPAR

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 586
  • NE Pa (USA)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #30 on: 05/28/2010 02:12 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #31 on: 05/28/2010 02:39 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Great job! Is there anyone here on the team?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12777
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 3548
  • Likes Given: 607
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #32 on: 05/28/2010 05:22 AM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Yes, but do they do service calls for computers built during the mid 1970s?  :)

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 05/28/2010 05:22 AM by edkyle99 »

Offline Downix

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7087
  • Liked: 15
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #33 on: 05/28/2010 01:39 PM »
It's fixed!

---  CHAS
I know remote computer support is pretty common these days, with people able to do service calls to computers thousands of miles away, but this is just ridiculous.

Yes, but do they do service calls for computers built during the mid 1970s?  :)

 - Ed Kyle
Yes, yes we do.

(oldest one to-date was from 1968, a "Tiger" whatever that was, never heard of it till the day we had to fix it)
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #34 on: 11/12/2010 03:56 AM »
Saturn Then and Now: 30 Years Since Voyager Visit

 

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-381&cid=release_2010-381



Ed Stone, project scientist for NASA's Voyager mission, remembers the first time he saw the kinks in one of Saturn's narrowest rings. It was the day the Voyager 1 spacecraft made its closest approach to the giant ringed planet, 30 years ago. Scientists were gathering in front of television monitors and in one another's offices every day during this heady period to pore over the bewildering images and other data streaming down to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

Stone drew a crude sketch of this scalloped, multi-stranded ring, known as the F ring, in his notebook, but with no explanation next to it. The innumerable particles comprising the broad rings are in near-circular orbits about Saturn. So, it was a surprise to find that the F ring, discovered just a year before by NASA's Pioneer 11 spacecraft, had clumps and wayward kinks. What could have created such a pattern?

"It was clear Voyager was showing us something different at Saturn," said Stone, now based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "Over and over, the spacecraft revealed so many unexpected things that it often took days, months and even years to figure them out."

The F ring curiosity was only one of many strange phenomena discovered in the Voyager close encounters with Saturn, which occurred on Nov. 12, 1980, for Voyager 1, and Aug. 25, 1981, for Voyager 2. The Voyager encounters were responsible for finding six small moons and revealing the half-young, half-old terrain of Enceladus that had to point to some kind of geological activity.

Images from the two encounters also exposed individual storms roiling the planet's atmosphere, which did not show up at all in data from Earth-based telescopes. Scientists used Voyager data to resolve a debate about whether Titan had a thick or thin atmosphere, finding that Titan was shrouded in a thick haze of hydrocarbons in a nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The finding led scientists to predict there could be seas of liquid methane and ethane on Titan's surface.

"When I look back, I realize how little we actually knew about the solar system before Voyager," Stone added. "We discovered things we didn't know were there to be discovered, time after time."

In fact, the Voyager encounters sparked so many new questions that another spacecraft, NASA's Cassini, was sent to probe those mysteries. While Voyager 1 got to within about 126,000 kilometers (78,300 miles) above Saturn's cloud tops, and Voyager 2 approached as close as about 100,800 kilometers (62,600 miles), Cassini has dipped to this altitude and somewhat lower in its orbits around Saturn since 2004.

Because of Cassini's extended journey around Saturn, scientists have found explanations for many of the mysteries first seen by Voyager. Cassini has uncovered a mechanism to explain the new terrain on Enceladus – tiger stripe fissures with jets of water vapor and organic particles. It revealed that Titan indeed does have stable lakes of liquid hydrocarbons on its surface and showed just how similar to Earth that moon really is. Data from Cassini have also resolved how two small moons discovered by Voyager – Prometheus and Pandora – tug on the F ring to create its kinked shape and wakes that form snowballs.

"Cassini is indebted to Voyager for its many fascinating discoveries and for paving the way for Cassini," said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at JPL, who started her career working on Voyager from 1977 to 1989. "On Cassini, we still compare our data to Voyager's and proudly build on Voyager's heritage."

But Voyager left a few mysteries that Cassini has not yet solved. For instance, scientists first spotted a hexagonal weather pattern when they stitched together Voyager images of Saturn's north pole. Cassini has obtained higher-resolution pictures of the hexagon – which tells scientists it's a remarkably stable wave in one of the jet streams that remains 30 years later – but scientists are still not sure what forces maintain the hexagon.

Even more perplexing are the somewhat wedge-shaped, transient clouds of tiny particles that Voyager discovered orbiting in Saturn's B ring. Scientists dubbed them "spokes" because they looked like bicycle spokes. Cassini scientists have been searching for them since the spacecraft first arrived. As Saturn approached equinox, and the sun's light hit the rings edge-on, the spokes did reappear in the outer part of Saturn's B ring. But Cassini scientists are still testing their theories of what might be causing these odd features.

"The fact that we still have mysteries today goes to show how much we still have to learn about our solar system," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager's project manager, based at JPL. "Today, the Voyager spacecraft continue as pioneers traveling toward the edge of our solar system. We can't wait for the Voyager spacecraft to enter interstellar space – true outer space – and make more unexpected discoveries."

Voyager 1, which was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, is currently about 17 billion kilometers (11 billion miles) away from the sun. It is the most distant spacecraft. Voyager 2, which was launched on Aug. 20, 1977, is currently about 14 billion kilometers (9 billion miles) away from the sun.

The Voyagers were built by JPL, which continues to operate both spacecraft. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL manages Cassini for NASA. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

More Voyager information is available at http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov .

More Cassini information is available at http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .


 

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2579
  • Europe
  • Liked: 188
  • Likes Given: 67
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #35 on: 12/14/2010 10:29 AM »
Voyager near Solar System's edge

14 December 2010

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, has reached a new milestone in its quest to leave the Solar System.

Now 17.4bn km (10.8bn miles) from home, the veteran probe has detected a distinct change in the flow of particles that surround it.

These particles, which emanate from the Sun, are no longer travelling outwards but are moving sideways.

It means Voyager must be very close to making the jump to interstellar space - the space between the stars.

This phenomenon is a consequence of the wind pushing up against the matter coming from other stars. The boundary between the two is the "official" edge of the Solar System - the heliopause. Once Voyager crosses over, it will be in interstellar space.

Voyager 1 is racing on towards the heliopause at 17km/s. Dr Stone expects the cross-over to occur within the next few years.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11988466
« Last Edit: 12/20/2010 12:38 PM by bolun »

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #36 on: 01/21/2011 06:22 PM »
Jan. 21, 2010

Voyager Celebrates 25 Years Since Uranus Visit

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-023&cid=release_2011-023

As NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft made the only close approach to date of our mysterious seventh planet Uranus 25 years ago, Project Scientist Ed Stone and the Voyager team gathered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., to pore over the data coming in.

Images of the small, icy Uranus moon Miranda were particularly surprising. Since small moons tend to cool and freeze over rapidly after their formation, scientists had expected a boring, ancient surface, pockmarked by crater-upon-weathered-crater. Instead they saw grooved terrain with linear valleys and ridges cutting through the older terrain and sometimes coming together in chevron shapes. They also saw dramatic fault scarps, or cliffs. All of this indicated that periods of tectonic and thermal activity had rocked Miranda's surface in the past.

The scientists were also shocked by data showing that Uranus's magnetic north and south poles were not closely aligned with the north-south axis of the planet's rotation. Instead, the planet's magnetic field poles were closer to the Uranian equator. This suggested that the material flows in the planet's interior that are generating the magnetic field are closer to the surface of Uranus than the flows inside Earth, Jupiter and Saturn are to their respective surfaces.

"Voyager 2's visit to Uranus expanded our knowledge of the unexpected diversity of bodies that share the solar system with Earth," said Stone, who is based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "Even though similar in many ways, the worlds we encounter can still surprise us."

Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977, 16 days before its twin, Voyager 1. After completing its prime mission of flying by Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 2 was sent on the right flight path to visit Uranus, which is about 3 billion kilometers (2 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 2 made its closest approach – within 81,500 kilometers (50,600 miles) of the Uranian cloud tops – on Jan. 24, 1986.

Before Voyager 2's visit, scientists had to learn about Uranus by using Earth-based and airborne telescopes. By observing dips in starlight as a star passed behind Uranus, scientists knew Uranus had nine narrow rings. But it wasn't until the Voyager 2 flyby that scientists were able to capture for the first time images of the rings and the tiny shepherding moons that sculpted them. Unlike Saturn's icy rings, they found Uranus' rings to be dark gray, reflecting only a few percent of the incident sunlight.

Scientists had also determined an average temperature for Uranus (59 Kelvin, or minus 350 degrees Fahrenheit) before this encounter, but the distribution of that temperature came as a surprise. Voyager showed there was heat transport from pole to pole in Uranus' atmosphere that maintained the same temperature at both poles, even though the sun was shining directly for decades on one pole and not the other.

By the end of the Uranus encounter and science analysis, data from Voyager 2 enabled the discovery of 11 new moons and two new rings, and generated dozens of science papers about the quirky seventh planet.

Voyager 2 moved on to explore Neptune, the last planetary target, in August 1989. It is now hurtling toward interstellar space, which is the space between stars. It is about 14 billion kilometers (9 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 1, which explored only Jupiter and Saturn before heading on a faster track toward interstellar space, is about 17 billion kilometers (11 billion miles) away from the sun.

"The Uranus encounter was one of a kind," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager, based at JPL. "Voyager 2 was healthy and durable enough to make it to Uranus and then to Neptune. Currently both Voyager spacecraft are on the cusp of leaving the sun's sphere of influence and once again blazing a trail of scientific discovery."

The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager . JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #37 on: 03/09/2011 03:15 PM »
News release: 2011-069                                                                     March 8, 2011

Voyager Seeks the Answer Blowin' in the Wind

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-069&cid=release_2011-069

PASADENA, Calif. -- In which direction is the sun's stream of charged particles banking when it nears the edge of the solar system? The answer, scientists know, is blowing in the wind. It's just a matter of getting NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in the right orientation to detect it.

To enable Voyager 1's Low Energy Charged Particle instrument to gather these data, the spacecraft performed a maneuver on March 7 that it hadn't done for 21 years, except in a preparatory test last month.

At 9:10 a.m. PST (12:10 p.m. EST), humanity's most distant spacecraft rolled 70 degrees counterclockwise as seen from Earth from its normal orientation and held the position by spinning gyroscopes for two hours, 33 minutes. The last time either of the two Voyager spacecraft rolled and stopped in a gyro-controlled orientation was Feb. 14, 1990, when Voyager 1 snapped a family portrait of the planets strewn like tiny gems around our sun (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00451).

"Even though Voyager 1 has been traveling through the solar system for 33 years, it is still a limber enough gymnast to do acrobatics we haven't asked it to do in 21 years," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "It executed the maneuver without a hitch, and we look forward to doing it a few more times to allow the scientists to gather the data they need."

The two Voyager spacecraft are traveling through a turbulent area known as the heliosheath. The heliosheath is the outer shell of a bubble around our solar system created by the solar wind, a stream of ions blowing radially outward from the sun at a million miles per hour. The wind must turn as it approaches the outer edge of the bubble where it makes contact with the interstellar wind, which originates in the region between stars and blows by our solar bubble.

In June 2010, when Voyager 1 was about 17 billion kilometers (about 11 billion miles) away from the sun, data from the Low Energy Charged Particle instrument began to show that the net outward flow of the solar wind was zero. That zero reading has continued since. The Voyager science team doesn't think the wind has disappeared in that area. It has likely just turned a corner. But does it go up, down or to the side?

"Because the direction of the solar wind has changed and its radial speed has dropped to zero, we have to change the orientation of Voyager 1 so the Low Energy Charged Particle instrument can act like a kind of weather vane to see which way the wind is now blowing," said Edward Stone, Voyager project manager, based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. "Knowing the strength and direction of the wind is critical to understanding the shape of our solar bubble and estimating how much farther it is to the edge of interstellar space."
Voyager engineers performed a test roll and hold on Feb. 2 for two hours, 15 minutes. When data from Voyager 1 were received on Earth some 16 hours later, the mission team verified the test was successful and the spacecraft had no problem in reorienting itself and locking back onto its guide star, Alpha Centauri.

The Low Energy Charged Particle instrument science team confirmed that the spacecraft had acquired the kind of information it needed, and mission planners gave Voyager 1 the green light to do more rolls and longer holds. There will be five more of these maneuvers over the next seven days, with the longest hold lasting three hours 50 minutes. The Voyager team plans to execute a series of weekly rolls for this purpose every three months.

The success of the March 7 roll and hold was received at JPL at 1:21 a.m. PST (4:21 a.m. EST) on March 8. But it will take a few months longer for scientists to analyze the data.
"We do whatever we can to make sure the scientists get exactly the kinds of data they need, because only the Voyager spacecraft are still active in this exotic region of space," said Jefferson Hall, Voyager mission operations manager at JPL. "We were delighted to see Voyager still has the capability to acquire unique science data in an area that won't likely be traveled by other spacecraft for decades to come."

Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977. Voyager 1 was launched on Sept. 5, 1977. On March 7, Voyager 1 was 17.4 billion kilometers (10.8 billion miles) away from the sun. Voyager 2 was 14.2 billion kilometers (8.8 billion miles) away from the sun, on a different trajectory.

The solar wind's outward flow has not yet diminished to zero where Voyager 2 is exploring, but that may happen as the spacecraft approaches the edge of the bubble in the years ahead.

The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate. For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager.


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #38 on: 04/22/2011 06:52 AM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-084

NASA INVITES PUBLIC TO TAKE A JOURNEY TOWARD INTERSTELLAR SPACE

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a special Science Update at 1 p.m. EDT on
Thursday, April 28, to discuss the unprecedented journey of NASA's
twin Voyager spacecraft to the edge of our solar system.

The event will be held in NASA headquarters' Webb auditorium at 300 E
St. SW, in Washington. It will be broadcast live on NASA Television
and streamed at:


http://www.nasa.gov   


After 33 years in space, the spacecraft still are operating and
returning data from about 10 billion miles away from our sun. The
Voyagers also carry a collection of images and sounds from Earth as a
message to possible life elsewhere in the galaxy.

The participants are:
-- Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist and professor of physics,
California Institute of Technology
-- Ann Druyan, creative director, Voyager Interstellar Message
Project; Carl Sagan's co-author and widow
-- Suzanne Dodd, Voyager Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
Pasadena, Calif.
-- Merav Opher, Voyager Guest Investigator and assistant professor of
astronomy, Boston University

Reporters also may ask questions from participating NASA field centers
or by phone. Journalists must send their name, affiliation and
telephone number to Dwayne Brown at: dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov by noon
on Wednesday, April 27, for dial-in information.

For more information about the Voyager mission, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/voyager   


For NASA TV streaming video and downlink information, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/ntv   


-end-


Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #39 on: 04/22/2011 09:28 PM »
It never ceases to amaze me that these two machines which were launched off of planet Earth before I was even born are still out there diligently sending back data, now out beyond the solar system tasting the edge of interstellar space... Mind-blowing.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8514
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 234
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #40 on: 04/24/2011 12:23 AM »
I still remember being in grade school during the jupiter encounter and feeling like the up and coming saturn would be a life time away!
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline joek

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2780
  • Liked: 534
  • Likes Given: 326
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #41 on: 04/24/2011 01:01 AM »
I remember being there doing image processing during Jupiter encounter and wondering if it would survive.  That was a heart-stopping life time.  :)

Offline joek

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2780
  • Liked: 534
  • Likes Given: 326
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #42 on: 04/24/2011 04:43 AM »
p.s. And I'll take this opportunity to pontificate that robotic exploration can be just as exciting and fulfilling as HSF.  HSF may be more exciting to many, but for those who have experienced it, living vicariously through robotic probes can be just as fulfilling and exciting.

The deep dark unknowns are where we lived.  What was beyond Mars?  Was the asteroid belt a danger?  Could we make it to Jupiter and beyond?

The precursor Pioneer 10/11 made it past the belt, but both had problems at Jupiter encounter.  IIRC... We almost lost Pioneer 10 due to anomalous/corrupted command sequence, and Pioneer 11 never fully recovered one of it's imaging tubes (I think think blue).  They got hurt, and hurt bad.  We all felt the hurt, and it was palpable.

Jupiter rad environment is a b**ch and no one (including Van Allen) was really prepared for what we found.  One of the great understatements was a post-encounter presentation titled "It's Really Hot In There"  We went where no man had gone, or could go.  Yet we survived.  More precisely, the mechanical progeny of our blood, sweat, tears and hopes survived.

Voyager was much bigger, sophisticated (and expensive) than Pioneer--and there was a lot more that could go wrong.  Even with Pioneer paving the way, Voyager Jupiter encounter was still a white-knuckle hold-your-breath moment.  Run the gauntlet!  Go baby go!  Talk to us!  IMHO no launch compares.

That the Pioneer's lived for another 25-30 years, and the Voyagers still live after 30+ years to tell their tale is truly amazing.  Kudo's to everyone involved then and now.  I am proud to say I contributed in very small part to the Pioneer and Voyager missions--and am as proud as if I had contributed to any Apollo missions.

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #43 on: 04/25/2011 03:30 PM »
Thank you, joek. :)
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #44 on: 04/29/2011 03:27 AM »
News release: 2011-128                                                                     April 28, 2011

Voyager Set to Enter Interstellar Space

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-128&cid=release_2011-128

More than 30 years after they left Earth, NASA's twin Voyager probes are now at the edge of the solar system. Not only that, they're still working. And with each passing day they are beaming back a message that, to scientists, is both unsettling and thrilling.

The message is, "Expect the unexpected."

"It's uncanny," says Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Voyager Project Scientist since 1972. "Voyager 1 and 2 have a knack for making discoveries."

Today, April 28, 2011, NASA held a live briefing to reflect on what the Voyager mission has accomplished--and to preview what lies ahead as the probes prepare to enter the realm of interstellar space in our Milky Way galaxy.

The adventure began in the late 1970s when the probes took advantage of a rare alignment of outer planets for an unprecedented Grand Tour. Voyager 1 visited Jupiter and Saturn, while Voyager 2 flew past Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. (Voyager 2 is still the only probe to visit Uranus and Neptune.)

When pressed to name the top discoveries from those encounters, Stone pauses, not for lack of material, but rather an embarrassment of riches. "It's so hard to choose," he says.

Stone's partial list includes the discovery of volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io; evidence for an ocean beneath the icy surface of Europa; hints of methane rain on Saturn's moon Titan; the crazily-tipped magnetic poles of Uranus and Neptune; icy geysers on Neptune's moon Triton; planetary winds that blow faster and faster with increasing distance from the sun.

"Each of these discoveries changed the way we thought of other worlds," says Stone.

In 1980, Voyager 1 used the gravity of Saturn to fling itself slingshot-style out of the plane of the solar system. In 1989, Voyager 2 got a similar assist from Neptune. Both probes set sail into the void.

Sailing into the void sounds like a quiet time, but the discoveries have continued.

Stone sets the stage by directing our attention to the kitchen sink. "Turn on the faucet," he instructs. "Where the water hits the sink, that's the sun, and the thin sheet of water flowing radially away from that point is the solar wind. Note how the sun 'blows a bubble' around itself."

There really is such a bubble, researchers call it the "heliosphere," and it is gargantuan. Made of solar plasma and magnetic fields, the heliosphere is about three times wider than the orbit of Pluto. Every planet, asteroid, spacecraft, and life form belonging to our solar system lies inside.

The Voyagers are trying to get out, but they're not there yet. To locate them, Stone peers back into the sink: "As the water [or solar wind] expands, it gets thinner and thinner, and it can't push as hard. Abruptly, a sluggish, turbulent ring forms. That outer ring is the heliosheath--and that is where the Voyagers are now."

The heliosheath is a very strange place, filled with a magnetic froth no spacecraft has ever encountered before, echoing with low-frequency radio bursts heard only in the outer reaches of the solar system, so far from home that the sun is a mere pinprick of light.

"In many ways, the heliosheath is not like our models predicted," says Stone.

In June 2010, Voyager 1 beamed back a startling number: zero. That's the outward velocity of the solar wind where the probe is now. No one thinks the solar wind has completely stopped; it may have just turned a corner. But which way? Voyager 1 is trying to figure that out through a series of "weather vane" maneuvers, in which the spacecraft turns itself in a different direction to track the local breeze. The old spacecraft still has some moves left, it seems.

No one knows exactly how many more miles the Voyagers must travel before they "pop free" into interstellar space. Most researchers believe, however, that the end is near. "The heliosheath is 3 to 4 billion miles in thickness," estimates Stone. "That means we'll be out within five years or so."

There is plenty of power for the rest of the journey. Both Voyagers are energized by the radioactive decay of a Plutonium 238 heat source. This should keep critical subsystems running through at least 2020.

After that, he says, "Voyager will become our silent ambassador to the stars."

Each probe is famously equipped with a Golden Record, literally, a gold-coated copper phonograph record. It contains 118 photographs of Earth; 90 minutes of the world's greatest music; an audio essay entitled Sounds of Earth (featuring everything from burbling mud pots to barking dogs to a roaring Saturn 5 liftoff); greetings in 55 human languages and one whale language; the brain waves of a young woman in love; and salutations from the secretary general of the United Nations. A team led by Carl Sagan assembled the record as a message to possible extraterrestrial civilizations that might encounter the spacecraft.

"A billion years from now, when everything on Earth we've ever made has crumbled into dust, when the continents have changed beyond recognition and our species is unimaginably altered or extinct, the Voyager record will speak for us," wrote Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan in an introduction to a CD version of the record.

Some people note that the chance of aliens finding the Golden Record is fantastically remote. The Voyager probes won't come within a few light years of another star for some 40,000 years. What are the odds of making contact under such circumstances?

On the other hand, what are the odds of a race of primates evolving to sentience, developing spaceflight, and sending the sound of barking dogs into the cosmos?
Expect the unexpected, indeed.

The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov and http://www.nasa.gov/voyager .


Offline Moe Grills

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 780
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #45 on: 04/30/2011 09:09 PM »
  They indicate that it could be five years before the Voyagers enter intersteller space.
That's cutting it pretty close I think, what with the diminishing power
output of the Voyagers, their weakening radio signal and decreasing signal-to-noise ratio. I hope they succeed.

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7366
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1519
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #46 on: 04/30/2011 09:13 PM »
  They indicate that it could be five years before the Voyagers enter intersteller space.
That's cutting it pretty close I think, what with the diminishing power
output of the Voyagers

There should be sufficient power at least until 2020.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #47 on: 06/09/2011 05:32 PM »
RELEASE: 11-174

NASA PROBES SUGGEST MAGNETIC BUBBLES RESIDE AT SOLAR SYSTEM EDGE

WASHINGTON -- Observations from NASA's Voyager spacecraft, humanity's
farthest deep space sentinels, suggest the edge of our solar system
may not be smooth, but filled with a turbulent sea of magnetic
bubbles.

While using a new computer model to analyze Voyager data, scientists
found the sun's distant magnetic field is made up of bubbles
approximately 100 million miles wide. The bubbles are created when
magnetic field lines reorganize. The new model suggests the field
lines are broken up into self-contained structures disconnected from
the solar magnetic field. The findings are described in the June 9
edition of the Astrophysical Journal.

Like Earth, our sun has a magnetic field with a north pole and a south
pole. The field lines are stretched outward by the solar wind or a
stream of charged particles emanating from the star that interacts
with material expelled from others in our corner of the Milky Way
galaxy.

The Voyager spacecraft, nearly 10 billion miles away from Earth, are
traveling in a boundary region. In that area, the solar wind and
magnetic field are affected by material expelled from other stars in
our corner of the Milky Way galaxy.

"The sun's magnetic field extends all the way to the edge of the solar
system," said astronomer Merav Opher of Boston University. "Because
the sun spins, its magnetic field becomes twisted and wrinkled, a bit
like a ballerina's skirt. Far, far away from the sun, where the
Voyagers are, the folds of the skirt bunch up."

Understanding the structure of the sun's magnetic field will allow
scientists to explain how galactic cosmic rays enter our solar system
and help define how the star interacts with the rest of the galaxy.

So far, much of the evidence for the existence of the bubbles
originates from an instrument aboard the spacecraft that measures
energetic particles. Investigators are studying more information and
hoping to find signatures of the bubbles in the Voyager magnetic
field data.

"We are still trying to wrap our minds around the implications of the
findings," said University of Maryland physicist Jim Drake, one of
Opher's colleagues.

Launched in 1977, the Voyager twin spacecraft have been on a 33-year
journey. They are en route to reach the edge of interstellar space.
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., built the
spacecraft and continues to operate them. The Voyager missions are a
part of the Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the
Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in
Washington.

To view supporting images about the research, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/sunearth   


Offline Cog_in_the_machine

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1235
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #48 on: 06/09/2011 09:02 PM »
^^ Warning! Contains opinions. ^^ 

Offline Downix

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7087
  • Liked: 15
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #49 on: 06/10/2011 02:47 AM »
I am as old as these two, the first moments I was aware of space travel was from them, even before the Shuttle lifted off.  This warms my heart to see them both still going.

Energizer rabbit, eat your heart out!
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #50 on: 06/15/2011 05:35 PM »
June 15, 2011

Recalculating the Distance to Interstellar Space

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-182&cid=release_2011-182

Scientists analyzing recent data from NASA's Voyager and Cassini spacecraft have calculated that Voyager 1 could cross over into the frontier of interstellar space at any time and much earlier than previously thought. The findings are detailed in this week's issue of the journal Nature.

Data from Voyager's low-energy charged particle instrument, first reported in December 2010, have indicated that the outward speed of the charged particles streaming from the sun has slowed to zero. The stagnation of this solar wind has continued through at least February 2011, marking a thick, previously unpredicted "transition zone" at the edge of our solar system.

"There is one time we are going to cross that frontier, and this is the first sign it is upon us," said Tom Krimigis, prinicipal investigator for Voyager's low-energy charged particle instrument and Cassini's magnetospheric imaging instrument, based at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.

Krimigis and colleagues combined the new Voyager data with previously unpublished measurements from the ion and neutral camera on Cassini's magnetospheric imaging instrument. The Cassini instrument collects data on neutral atoms streaming into our solar system from the outside.

The analysis indicates that the boundary between interstellar space and the bubble of charged particles the sun blows around itself is likely between 10 and 14 billion miles (16 to 23 kilometers) from the sun, with a best estimate of approximately 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers). Since Voyager 1 is already nearly 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) out, it could cross into interstellar space at any time.

"These calculations show we're getting close, but how close? That's what we don't know, but Voyager 1 speeds outward a billion miles every three years, so we may not have long to wait," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist, based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

Scientists intend to keep analyzing the Voyager 1 data, looking for confirmation. They will also be studying the Voyager 2 data, but Voyager 2 is not as close to the edge of the solar system as Voyager 1. Voyager 2 is about 9 billion miles (14 billion kilometers) away from the sun.

Launched in 1977, the Voyager twin spacecraft have been on a 33-year journey. They are humanity's farthest working deep space sentinels enroute to reach the edge of interstellar space. The Voyagers were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is managed for NASA by Caltech.

More information about Voyager is available at: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov .


Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2580
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #51 on: 11/05/2011 09:06 PM »
Voyager 2 to Switch to Backup Thruster Set

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20111105.html

Online Kaputnik

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
  • Liked: 445
  • Likes Given: 375
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #52 on: 11/06/2011 01:44 PM »
I didn't realise the thrusters got so much use. How long is the propellant expected to last? And do the roll manoeuvres consume much propellant?
Waiting for joy and raptor

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7366
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1519
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #53 on: 11/06/2011 01:51 PM »
Not pitch/yaw/roll *maneuvers* per se, but 3-axis stabilization requires maintaining specific pointing within a certain deadband.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #54 on: 12/05/2011 04:35 PM »
RELEASE: 11-402

NASA'S VOYAGER HITS NEW REGION AT SOLAR SYSTEM EDGE

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered a new region
between our solar system and interstellar space. Data obtained from
Voyager over the last year reveal this new region to be a kind of
cosmic purgatory. In it, the wind of charged particles streaming out
from our sun has calmed, our solar system's magnetic field piles up
and higher energy particles from inside our solar system appear to be
leaking out into interstellar space.

"Voyager tells us now that we're in a stagnation region in the
outermost layer of the bubble around our solar system," said Ed
Stone, Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of
Technology in Pasadena. "Voyager is showing that what is outside is
pushing back. We shouldn't have long to wait to find out what the
space between stars is really like."

Although Voyager 1 is about 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers)
from the sun, it is not yet in interstellar space. In the latest
data, the direction of the magnetic field lines has not changed,
indicating Voyager is still within the heliosphere, the bubble of
charged particles the sun blows around itself. The data do not reveal
exactly when Voyager 1 will make it past the edge of the solar
atmosphere into interstellar space, but suggest it will be in a few
months to a few years.

The latest findings, described today at the American Geophysical
Union's fall meeting in San Francisco, come from Voyager's Low Energy
Charged Particle instrument, Cosmic Ray Subsystem and Magnetometer.

Scientists previously reported the outward speed of the solar wind had
diminished to zero in April 2010, marking the start of the new
region. Mission managers rolled the spacecraft several times this
spring and summer to help scientists discern whether the solar wind
was blowing strongly in another direction. It was not. Voyager 1 is
plying the celestial seas in a region similar to Earth's doldrums,
where there is very little wind.

During this past year, Voyager's magnetometer also detected a doubling
in the intensity of the magnetic field in the stagnation region. Like
cars piling up at a clogged freeway off-ramp, the increased intensity
of the magnetic field shows that inward pressure from interstellar
space is compacting it.

Voyager has been measuring energetic particles that originate from
inside and outside our solar system. Until mid-2010, the intensity of
particles originating from inside our solar system had been holding
steady. But during the past year, the intensity of these energetic
particles has been declining, as though they are leaking out into
interstellar space. The particles are now half as abundant as they
were during the previous five years.

At the same time, Voyager has detected a 100-fold increase in the
intensity of high-energy electrons from elsewhere in the galaxy
diffusing into our solar system from outside, which is another
indication of the approaching boundary.

"We've been using the flow of energetic charged particles at Voyager 1
as a kind of wind sock to estimate the solar wind velocity," said Rob
Decker, a Voyager Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument
co-investigator at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics
Laboratory in Laurel, Md. "We've found that the wind speeds are low
in this region and gust erratically. For the first time, the wind
even blows back at us. We are evidently traveling in completely new
territory. Scientists had suggested previously that there might be a
stagnation layer, but we weren't sure it existed until now."

Launched in 1977, Voyager 1 and 2 are in good health. Voyager 2 is 9
billion miles (15 billion kilometers) away from the sun.

The Voyager spacecraft were built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both. JPL is a
division of the California Institute of Technology. The Voyager
missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory,
sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission
Directorate in Washington. For more information about the Voyager
spacecraft, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/voyager


Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #55 on: 12/05/2011 07:46 PM »
Awesome. Just about there to interstellar space.... Reminds me a little of Achilles and the Tortoise. :)
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2580
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #56 on: 01/18/2012 10:20 AM »
Voyager Instrument Cooling After Heater Turned off

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-017

Offline marshallsplace

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 707
  • UK
    • music website
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #57 on: 01/18/2012 12:36 PM »
Voyager Instrument Cooling After Heater Turned off

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-017

"This heater shut-off is a step in the careful management of the diminishing electrical power so that the Voyager spacecraft can continue to collect and transmit data through 2025"

How amazing and "cool" are these spacecraft :)

Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2580
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #58 on: 06/15/2012 09:28 AM »
Data From NASA's Voyager 1 Point to Interstellar Future

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-177

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #59 on: 08/03/2012 10:23 PM »
 Aug. 3, 2012

Signs Changing Fast for Voyager at Solar System Edge

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-225&cid=release_2012-225

Two of three key signs of changes expected to occur at the boundary of interstellar space have changed faster than at any other time in the last seven years, according to new data from NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft.

For the last seven years, Voyager 1 has been exploring the outer layer of the bubble of charged particles the sun blows around itself. In one day, on July 28, data from Voyager 1's cosmic ray instrument showed the level of high-energy cosmic rays originating from outside our solar system jumped by five percent. During the last half of that same day, the level of lower-energy particles originating from inside our solar system dropped by half. However, in three days, the levels had recovered to near their previous levels.

A third key sign is the direction of the magnetic field, and scientists are eagerly analyzing the data to see whether that has, indeed, changed direction. Scientists expect that all three of these signs will have changed when Voyager 1 has crossed into interstellar space. A preliminary analysis of the latest magnetic field data is expected to be available in the next month.

"These are thrilling times for the Voyager team as we try to understand the quickening pace of changes as Voyager 1 approaches the edge of interstellar space," said Edward Stone, the Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. "We are certainly in a new region at the edge of the solar system where things are changing rapidly. But we are not yet able to say that Voyager 1 has entered interstellar space."

The levels of high-energy cosmic ray particles have been increasing for years, but more slowly than they are now. The last jump -- of five percent -- took one week in May. The levels of lower-energy particles from inside our solar system have been slowly decreasing for the last two years. Scientists expect that the lower-energy particles will drop close to zero when Voyager 1 finally crosses into interstellar space.

"The increase and the decrease are sharper than we've seen before, but that's also what we said about the May data," Stone said. "The data are changing in ways that we didn't expect, but Voyager has always surprised us with new discoveries."

Voyager 1, which launched on Sept. 5, 1977, is 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from the sun. Voyager 2, which launched on Aug. 20, 1977, is close behind, at 9.3 billion miles (15 billion kilometers) from the sun.

"Our two veteran Voyager spacecraft are hale and healthy as they near the 35th anniversary of their launch," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena. "We know they will cross into interstellar space. It's just a question of when."

The Voyager spacecraft were built by JPL, which continues to operate both. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology. The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager .

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #60 on: 08/17/2012 03:57 AM »
Tonight a project scientist (Alan Cummings) lectured about the Voyager probes live on Ustream.  I watched it and he noted that the Voyager 1 craft *may* - I emphasize *may* - be in interstellar space now, as of tonight.  They need more data to know for sure, and he said that it is far more likely they'd be in interstellar space in 13 days to 13 months rather than 13 years (when the power for the craft gives out, in 2025). 

Other highlights: IBEX indicates no bow shock at solar system's edge, a couple of funny animations, one showing Star Trek's Voyager craft, a slide show of Voyager's pics of the outer solar system, and a pic of the "pale blue dot" - Earth as a speck of light in February 1990.  The Voyagers are 13 light hours away from earth and Voyager 1 is 11.2 billion miles away from us.

A craft made by human hands in interstellar space.  How. Huge. Is. That.
« Last Edit: 08/17/2012 04:10 AM by Bubbinski »
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline MP99

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #61 on: 08/17/2012 11:23 AM »
Tonight a project scientist (Alan Cummings) lectured about the Voyager probes live on Ustream.  I watched it and he noted that the Voyager 1 craft *may* - I emphasize *may* - be in interstellar space now, as of tonight.  They need more data to know for sure, and he said that it is far more likely they'd be in interstellar space in 13 days to 13 months rather than 13 years (when the power for the craft gives out, in 2025). 

Other highlights: IBEX indicates no bow shock at solar system's edge, a couple of funny animations, one showing Star Trek's Voyager craft, a slide show of Voyager's pics of the outer solar system, and a pic of the "pale blue dot" - Earth as a speck of light in February 1990.  The Voyagers are 13 light hours away from earth and Voyager 1 is 11.2 billion miles away from us.

A craft made by human hands in interstellar space.  How. Huge. Is. That.

Many thanks. You wouldn't know if there's an archive of that on Ustream?

cheers, Martin

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #62 on: 08/17/2012 11:37 AM »
 I was trying to get a 2 mile long data link up yesterday and thought of a 1970s radio that hadn't been PM'd in 35 years, still talking 11 billion miles away. It was embarrassing.
« Last Edit: 08/17/2012 04:32 PM by Nomadd »

Offline jnc

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 277
  • Yorktown, Virginia
    • Home page
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #63 on: 08/17/2012 11:56 AM »
A craft made by human hands in interstellar space.  How. Huge. Is. That.

And it's still operational! And we're still talking to it!!!

Awesome craft. A big tip of the hatly hat to the people who built these amazing probes.

Noel
"America Needs - Space to Grow"

(old bumper sticker)

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #64 on: 08/17/2012 01:55 PM »
I know they said they were going to record the talk but I haven't seen it on Ustream yet.
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #65 on: 08/18/2012 05:53 PM »
Amazing to think that it may now have reached interstellar space.

Is there any indication when Voyager 2 will follow into interstellar space?

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #66 on: 08/31/2012 05:31 AM »
I think Voyager 2 is 2 billion miles behind Voyager 1.  And I heard that the Voyagers rack up a billion miles every 3 years. 
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #67 on: 09/05/2012 02:24 AM »
Right now there's a JPL lecture about Voyager being shown on Ustream.  Interstellar space is between 117 and 177 AU away from us as per the lecturer, after analyzing the Voyager plasma wave experiments.
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #68 on: 09/05/2012 02:36 AM »
The project scientist said Voyager 1 could enter interstellar space within days.  Or maybe weeks, months, a couple of years, they're not sure.  Highest cosmic rays ever recorded within the last month, solar wind particles near zero.  Still analyzing magnetic field, if there's a direction change they'll know they're in interstellar space.

Edited to add: during the Q&A session one of the scientists said he thinks he has refined his estimate of the start of interstellar space, the end of the solar wind's influence, to 126 AU, give or take a few AU.  Voyager 1 is at 122 AU.
« Last Edit: 09/05/2012 03:07 AM by Bubbinski »
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #69 on: 10/08/2012 09:50 AM »
Well, big news reported on another site today: Read it here!

In summary, the readings from the Voyager 1 cosmic ray detector have dropped off substantively and then levelled off.  If readings from the spacecraft's magnetometer confirm the sudden change, then there is good reason to believe that Voyager 1 has passed over the heliopause into interstellar space.

Voyager 1 - The first starship!
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #70 on: 10/08/2012 07:14 PM »
Well, big news reported on another site today: Read it here!

In summary, the readings from the Voyager 1 cosmic ray detector have dropped off substantively and then levelled off.  If readings from the spacecraft's magnetometer confirm the sudden change, then there is good reason to believe that Voyager 1 has passed over the heliopause into interstellar space.

Voyager 1 - The first starship!

If confirmed to me a truly remarkable event.

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #71 on: 10/09/2012 12:28 PM »
Well, big news reported on another site today: Read it here!

In summary, the readings from the Voyager 1 cosmic ray detector have dropped off substantively and then levelled off.  If readings from the spacecraft's magnetometer confirm the sudden change, then there is good reason to believe that Voyager 1 has passed over the heliopause into interstellar space.

Voyager 1 - The first starship!

A correction on my previous post:

It is the solar charged particle detector that has detected a sharp drop-off at roughly the same time as the cosmic ray detector has noted an marked increase of events.  Both of these are broadly as predicted for the transit over the heliopause.
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Liss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 909
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Liked: 109
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #72 on: 10/11/2012 07:49 AM »
To illustrate these reports:

My version of low energy (> 0.5 MeV) and high energy (> 70 MeV) Voyager 1 CRS flux from 2001 till now.



The abrupt drop in 0.5 MeV curve in details as of now:



Galactic rays level raised next 15% at the same timeframe:


This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8514
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 234
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #73 on: 10/11/2012 01:53 PM »
Well, big news reported on another site today: Read it here!

Btw. That site is sourcing this Houston Chronicle blog article by Eric Berger:  More evidence that Voyager has exited the solar system
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline Ares67

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • Oliver
  • Remscheid, Germany
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #74 on: 10/16/2012 10:22 PM »
Interested in Voyager 2's Neptune encounter and the "Pale Blue Dot?" - You may want to have a look at:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30113.msg968889#msg968889

« Last Edit: 10/16/2012 10:24 PM by Ares67 »

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #75 on: 10/17/2012 04:55 PM »
For those in the UK there is a new documentary on Voyager 1 & 2 on the 25/10/2012 broadcast on BBC Four at 21:00.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01nj48v

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #76 on: 10/25/2012 11:42 AM »
For some reason the documentary was shifted forward to 24/10/12.

I managed to catch it and was very impressed by some of the things I didn't know before.  Specifically, that the mathematics of gravitational slingshots had only been solved about 15 years before the Voyagers were launched.  I also didn't previously realise the degree to which the flight control engineers were flying in the dark, so to speak, whilst planning the fly-bys.

It was a fairly fluffy and insubstantial program, focussing more on the people than the science.  Carl Sagan was clearly seen by the writers as a pivotal figure as far as the 'vision thing' went.  I'm glad that they mentioned the 'family portrait' at the end though.

So... The figures I'm seeing is that the Voyagers will have enough power to run all of the reduced number of systems required for their current mission until about 2020 with the power generated by the RTG falling too low to even operate the transmitter in about 2025.  Does anyone have a rough figure how far out they will be by then?

Specifically, I wonder if either would have reached the inner edge of the Oort Cloud.  The Cloud fascinates me; there are good theoretical reasons for inferring its existence but, unless I'm greatly mistaken, it is impossible to detect from Earth because its constituent objects are so small, so low-albedo and so distant.  Perhaps, though, tracking Voyager 1 and Voyager 2's motions, even with their sensors shut down so they nothing but homing beacons, will allow scientists to determine if there are any mass concentrations out there consistent with Oort Cloud objects.
« Last Edit: 10/25/2012 11:51 AM by Ben the Space Brit »
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #77 on: 10/25/2012 12:12 PM »
 I think it's around 900,000 miles a day at the moment. Call it another 4 billion miles out (Blatant American caveman refusal to join the modern world syndrome) by 2025.
 I wish someone would write a book on the history of the DSN. It amazes me that we can still communicate with an ancient low power radio that far out.

Offline Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3910
  • Liked: 1232
  • Likes Given: 1047
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #78 on: 10/25/2012 08:38 PM »
For good data on the flights of Voyagers 1 & 2 (and Pioneer 10 & 11 and New Horizons) go to the Heavens Above page for Spacecraft escaping the Solar System.

It says that as of today Voyager 1 is 122.249 AU from the Sun and moving out at 17.041 km.sec or 3.595 AU/year.
Voyager 1 is 99.902 AU from the Sun and moving out at 15.434 km.sec or 3.256  AU/year.

From this you could answer your question but YDOCMV.  (Your Distance to the Oort Cloud May Vary]
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline MP99

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #79 on: 10/25/2012 09:08 PM »
A few minutes ago http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/where/index.html said (edited):-

Quote
WHERE ARE THE VOYAGERS?

Voyager 1
Distance from Earth    
18,379,042,967 KM     122.85631394 AU

Distance from the Sun    
18,289,406,431 KM     122.25713071 AU

Roundtrip Light Time from the Sun    
34:03:31 hh:mm:ss
video
hi-res



Voyager 2
Distance from Earth    
14,976,163,690 KM     100.10947094 AU

Distance from the Sun    
14,948,728,587 KM     99.92607861 AU

Roundtrip Light Time from the Sun    
27:45:10 hh:mm:ss
video



FAST FACTS

Location: Voyager 1 and 2 are currently in the "Heliosheath" -- the outermost layer of the heliosphere where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas.

Launch & Exploration: NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was launched in September 1977 and flew by Jupiter and Saturn before continuing on toward interstellar space. NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft also flew by Jupiter and Saturn and went on to explore Uranus and Neptune. It is still the only spacecraft to have visited those outer planets.

read more

Edit: clicking more, and more again, gives:-
Quote
The Voyagers should cross the heliopause 10 to 20 years after reaching the termination shock. The Voyagers have enough electrical power and thruster fuel to operate at least until 2020. By that time, Voyager 1 will be 12.4 billion miles (19.9 billion KM) from the Sun and Voyager 2 will be 10.5 billion miles (16.9 billion KM) away.
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/interstellar.html

cheers, Martin
« Last Edit: 10/25/2012 09:20 PM by MP99 »

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #80 on: 10/26/2012 08:46 PM »
Carolyn Porco tweeted that yesterday she learned that Voyager was likely in interstellar space now.  Humankind's first starship.
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #81 on: 10/26/2012 09:39 PM »
Carolyn Porco tweeted that yesterday she learned that Voyager was likely in interstellar space now.  Humankind's first starship.

If confirmed, then every byte of data now received from the probe is probably amongst the most significant astrophysical measurements ever taken (to date).
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Liss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 909
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Liked: 109
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #82 on: 11/13/2012 08:13 PM »
Amazing to think that it may now have reached interstellar space.

Is there any indication when Voyager 2 will follow into interstellar space?
As of today, we do not have confirmation that Voyager 1 exited heliosphere. We know only of fast increase of galactic cosmic rays (33% since May 2012) and abrupt decrease in termination shock particles (10-15 times in one month of August). Changes in these counts do not directly mirror changes in magnetic field which is the ultimate sign of the heliopause crossing.
But judging from dates of initial TCP surge and termination shock passings for both V1 and V2 I dare to predict that Voyager 2 will be in the same conditions as Voyager 1 sees now -- by mid-2015.
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline spectre9

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2403
  • Australia
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 66
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #83 on: 11/13/2012 11:04 PM »
So what's the deal?

Need to wait until both pass through to interstellar space so it can be confirmed where the edge is?

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #84 on: 11/14/2012 05:54 PM »
Need to wait until both pass through to interstellar space so it can be confirmed where the edge is?

That would certainly be interesting to know although I'm not sure two data-points would be enough to extrapolate the geometry of the heliosheath.  I think something more important would be that, if Voyager 2 encounters similar conditions, it will prove that this is something characteristic of this area of the solar system's edge, not something unique to the part of space Voyager 1 is flying through.

BTW - It is now believed that the solar system is travelling at 'subsonic' velocities relative to the interstellar medium, so there is some possibility that the magnetic field direction changes might be gradual.  More data is thus needed from Voyager 1 before we can be sure.

Does anyone know how often NASA checks in with the probe? Daily?
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #85 on: 11/30/2012 06:39 PM »
News feature: 2012-379                                                                    Nov. 30, 2012

NASA to Host Dec. 3 Teleconference About Voyager Mission


The full version of this story with accompanying images is at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-379&cid=release_2012-379

PASADENA,Calif.-- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. PST (2 p.m. EST) on Monday, Dec. 3, to discuss the latest findings and travels of NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft.

Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, have been speeding through the outer reaches of our solar system and sending back unprecedented data about the bubble of charged particles around our sun. They were launched in 1977 and have traveled farther from Earth than any other spacecraft.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at:http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2.


For more information about the Voyager mission, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/voyagerandhttp://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.

 


Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #86 on: 11/30/2012 08:37 PM »
This 12/3 presser will likely be either a confirmation that Voyager 1 has entered interstellar space or a discussion of why they say it hasn't (a scientifically important conclusion in itself).
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #87 on: 12/03/2012 06:48 PM »
It hasn't left the Solar System yet instead it has entered a previously unexpected outer region of the Solar System.

Quote
NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered a new region at the far reaches of our solar system that scientists feel is the final area the spacecraft has to cross before reaching interstellar space.

Scientists refer to this new region as a magnetic highway for charged particles because our sun's magnetic field lines are connected to interstellar magnetic field lines. This connection allows lower-energy charged particles that originate from inside our heliosphere -- or the bubble of charged particles the sun blows around itself -- to zoom out and allows higher-energy particles from outside to stream in. Before entering this region, the charged particles bounced around in all directions, as if trapped on local roads inside the heliosphere.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/m/news/index.cfm?release=2012-381

Offline Moe Grills

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 780
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #88 on: 12/03/2012 08:26 PM »
Why do I feel like a dog chasing a sausage on a stick tied to my waist?

  :-\
« Last Edit: 12/03/2012 08:26 PM by Moe Grills »

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #89 on: 12/04/2012 01:28 AM »
Voyager's Ride on the Magnetic Highway

Published on Dec 3, 2012 by JPLnews

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered a new region of our solar system that scientists feel is the final area the spacecraft has to cross before reaching interstellar space.

« Last Edit: 12/04/2012 01:28 AM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #90 on: 12/04/2012 09:22 AM »
You can appreciate why the Voyager 1 team are so concerned about not rushing announcements.  You only have to look at how much trouble the Curiosity team have gotten into by letting off-the-cuff remarks leak out and then get mis-reported in a way that creates completely inaccurate impressions of their findings to date.  I don't think that they want to go down that route.

FWIW, I think that we know too little about the solar system's boundary to really make accurate and quick conclusions based on the Voyager 1 data.  The fact that the boundary is subsonic and therefore will be a merge rather than a distinct and abrupt change makes it even harder to be absolutely certain about what the probe is encountering.

If nothing else, Voyager 1 is giving physicists data on large magnetic fields on a scale that even few theoreticians have ever dreamt of - a magnetic field about 25AU across and its subsonic interactions with a one that is around a hundred kiloparsecs across? On this scale, boundary conditions that are quantum-sized in any laboratory on Earth could stretch to the size of the Earth/Moon system!
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Silmfeanor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1163
  • Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 216
  • Likes Given: 455
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #91 on: 12/21/2012 10:44 AM »
Some humor:

https://twitter.com/NASAVoyager2
Quote
END MAYACAL BTUN 12.19.19.17.19 SHUTDOWN:UNIV(12) BEGIN BTUN 13.0.0.0.0 BOOT:UNIV(13)

from a distance of about 14 hours 01 minutes and some seconds out there, lightspeed. Didnt know the voyagers where using the mayan calender  ;D
« Last Edit: 12/21/2012 10:45 AM by Silmfeanor »

Offline MP99

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #92 on: 12/21/2012 02:53 PM »
Fab. Sounds like someone in NASA has been inspired by SarcasticRover - "doing a science", etc.

cheers, Martin

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #93 on: 03/20/2013 05:24 PM »
News release: 2013-107                                                             March 20, 2013

NASA Voyager Status Update on Voyager 1 Location

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-107&cid=release_2013-107

"The Voyager team is aware of reports today that NASA's Voyager 1 has left the solar system," said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. "It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space. In December 2012, the Voyager science team reported that Voyager 1 is within a new region called 'the magnetic highway' where energetic particles changed dramatically. A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space and that change of direction has not yet been observed."

To learn more about the current status of the Voyager mission: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-381


Offline mlindner

  • Software Engineer
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Space Capitalist
  • Silicon Valley, CA -- previously in Ann Arbor, MI
  • Liked: 465
  • Likes Given: 187
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #94 on: 03/20/2013 10:21 PM »
What prompted this?
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline Lar

  • Fan boy at large
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8609
  • Saw Gemini live on TV
  • A large LEGO storage facility ... in Michigan
  • Liked: 5366
  • Likes Given: 3550
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #95 on: 03/20/2013 10:27 PM »
« Last Edit: 03/20/2013 10:27 PM by Lar »
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #96 on: 03/21/2013 10:16 AM »
I think that this is the first non-scientific pre-shocks of a debate in the heliophysics world about what specifically defines as 'the edge of the solar system'.  We actually know of at least two - the electromagnetic boundary (the heliopause) and the gravitational boundary (which you can define as the most distant Oort Cloud orbit).

NASA have given their own opinion on this matter.  However, I think that there is actually now a debate ongoing on what the Voyager data actually means.  Various different opinions are flying back and forth and only time will tell which one prevails.

For what it's worth, I personally think that Voyager is actually passing over the heliopause, a process which may take considerable time.  The concept of 'boundary' produces entirely erroneous images in the human mind of a distinct, near-dimensionless border-line and transition.  However, in the real solar system, it may be a zone of progressively changing conditions that may extend for tens of millions of kilometres and may pulsate greatly in size and radius from the sun depending on solar activity.
« Last Edit: 03/21/2013 10:17 AM by Ben the Space Brit »
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Lurker Steve

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1420
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #97 on: 03/21/2013 04:57 PM »
To be fair, let's not blame this on Fox News. It was the "American Geophysical Union" to blame as the source of the false report. At least the NY Times got the full story.

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #98 on: 03/21/2013 06:15 PM »
“The Voyager team is aware of reports today that NASA’s Voyager 1 has
left the solar system,” said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist
based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. “It is
the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet
left the solar system or reached interstellar space.”
http://science.time.com/2013/0...

"NASA adds another condition—one that the AGU accepts: the magnetic field
that surrounds the ship will have to change direction, indicating that
solar magnetism is yielding to the deeper magnetism of space. Last
December, the fields begin interlocking and lining up—putting Voyager on what Stone calls the “magnetic highway.” But the ship hasn’t taken the exit ramp to deeper space yet.
http://science.time.com/2013/0...

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8514
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 234
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #99 on: 03/22/2013 12:06 PM »
xkcd today !!!

http://xkcd.com/1189/

If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline MP99

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #100 on: 03/22/2013 03:17 PM »
xkcd today !!!

http://xkcd.com/1189/

Beat me to it. Brilliant.

BTW - note to mods
Quote
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

This means you're free to copy and share these comics (but not to sell them). More details.

cheers, Martin

Offline belegor

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 321
  • Switzerland
  • Liked: 12
  • Likes Given: 67
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #101 on: 03/22/2013 08:31 PM »
xkcd today !!!

http://xkcd.com/1189/

And for completeness, the alt text:
Quote
So far Voyager 1 has 'left the Solar System' by passing through the termination shock three times, the heliopause twice, and once each through the heliosheath, heliosphere, heliodrome, auroral discontinuity, Heaviside layer, trans-Neptunian panic zone, magnetogap, US Census Bureau Solar System statistical boundary, Kuiper gauntlet, Oort void, and crystal sphere holding the fixed stars.

 ;D

Offline morganism

  • Member
  • Posts: 26
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #102 on: 04/04/2013 08:50 AM »
from the Tumblr blog of Robot Shaming

http://robotshaming.tumblr.com/archive


Offline a_langwich

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 735
  • Liked: 211
  • Likes Given: 48
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #103 on: 06/27/2013 10:20 PM »

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-209

Quote
"Research using Voyager 1 data and published in the journal Science today provides new detail on the last region the spacecraft will cross before it leaves the heliosphere, or the bubble around our sun, and enters interstellar space. Three papers describe how Voyager 1's entry into a region called the magnetic highway resulted in simultaneous observations of the highest rate so far of charged particles from outside heliosphere and the disappearance of charged particles from inside the heliosphere.

Scientists have seen two of the three signs of interstellar arrival they expected to see: charged particles disappearing as they zoom out along the solar magnetic field, and cosmic rays from far outside zooming in. Scientists have not yet seen the third sign, an abrupt change in the direction of the magnetic field, which would indicate the presence of the interstellar magnetic field. "

Very exciting science, IMO.  You can learn a lot by staying at home and analyzing the things that come in, and inferring what it must be like outside...but sometimes there is no substitute for stepping outside.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #104 on: 06/28/2013 05:13 PM »
BBC article.

Quote
Ed Stone cannot say when the Voyager-1 spacecraft will leave the Solar System, but he believes the moment is close.

The latest data from this extraordinary probe, reported in this week's Science journal, suggests it is surfing right on the very edge of our Sun's domain.

The particles streaming away from our star have reduced to a trickle at its present location, 18.5 billion km from Earth.

Particles flying towards it from interstellar space, by contrast, have jumped markedly in the past year.

It all points to an imminent departure, which would make Voyager the first man-made object to cross into the space between the stars.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23075332

Offline a_langwich

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 735
  • Liked: 211
  • Likes Given: 48
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #105 on: 06/29/2013 08:42 PM »

I think what has prompted the latest releases (besides the article in Science) was not so much the "Elvis really is leaving the building this time" angle, but the observation of cosmic ray anisotropy.  They have observed more cosmic rays parallel to the (still solar-system-aligned) magnetic field than perpendicular to it, and apparently this plus the other data at this location doesn't match any model. 

The press releases are all focused on where Voyager 1 will soon(?) be going, rather than the excitement of data about its present never-before-investigated location.

Offline JohnFornaro

  • Not an expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9162
  • Delta-t is the salient metric.
  • Planet Eaarth
    • Design / Program Associates
  • Liked: 610
  • Likes Given: 314
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #106 on: 07/04/2013 01:41 PM »
V-ger rox.
Sometimes I just flat out don't get it.

Offline cosmicvoid

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • Seattle 'ish
  • Liked: 22
  • Likes Given: 31
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #107 on: 07/24/2013 03:41 AM »
How are the Voyagers considered to be near to "leaving the solar system" when they aren't even 10% of the way to the Oort cloud?  Or is the Oort cloud not considered to be part of the solar system?
Infiinity or bust.

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #108 on: 07/24/2013 04:29 AM »
I believe the boundary is determined by the solar versus interstellar wind. Once the Voyager probes cross the boundary where the solar wind stops and the interstellar medium takes over that is where the probes cross over into interstellar space. The Ort cloud by that definition would not be part of the Solar System.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #109 on: 08/17/2013 09:20 AM »
Another debate has broken out as to whether Voyager 1 has left the Solar System or not.

http://www.universetoday.com/104143/voyager-1-is-it-in-or-is-it-out/
« Last Edit: 08/17/2013 09:21 AM by Star One »

Offline JohnFornaro

  • Not an expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9162
  • Delta-t is the salient metric.
  • Planet Eaarth
    • Design / Program Associates
  • Liked: 610
  • Likes Given: 314
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #110 on: 08/17/2013 01:37 PM »
Quote from: that there article
It might all seem like an awful lot of flip-flopping by supposedly-respectable scientists.

It is definitely that.

Still, what with Kepler and all, they don't make 'em like they used to.
Sometimes I just flat out don't get it.

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #111 on: 08/18/2013 08:24 AM »
Here's a thought - Voyager 1 might have left and returned to the solar system at least once.  What am I talking about? The outer boundary must be partially dependent on solar output, which varies on the 11-year solar cycle.  Voyager 1 has been in the outskirts for long enough for it to have any variable outer boundary ripple over it in both directions during the last cycle.

This is an example of just one of the serious problems that confront scientists about determining if Voyager 1 has entered the interstellar electromagnetic medium.  The biggest, of course, is that the science team are literally flying blind.  We've got good theories but zero actual evidence of what the probe will actually encounter so an awful lot is up to educated interpretation of the data.  That, as we've seen, leaves a lot of room for uncertainty.
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8514
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 234
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #112 on: 08/19/2013 02:34 PM »
In other words, like walking on the beach, it is in the Surf. Neither in the Ocean or really on the Beach.

I just knew they should have included a beach boys album instead of that gold disk!
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #113 on: 09/04/2013 11:13 AM »
 I've been trying to figure the distance Voyager I has traveled in 36 years, but was stymied by not knowing the exact trajectory. In any case, to give interstellar travel some perspective, sometime this year the spacecraft's odometer passed 1/500th of a light year.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #114 on: 09/04/2013 01:38 PM »
To what angle with respect to the Sun's orbital plane (wrt the galaxy) and the orbital vector did it went? One would expect the limit to be closer an better defined towards the advance vector and farther and chaotic in the opposite direction. But if the Sun's magnetic field affects it, then the Sun's rotational plane should also be important, right?

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #115 on: 09/12/2013 12:55 AM »
NASA TO ANNOUCE TOMORROW THAT VOYAGER 1 LEFT SOLAR SYSTEM 1 YEAR AGO!  ;D
Congratulations on becoming humanity's first interstellar probe.
http://nasawatch.com/archives/2013/09/voyager-1-left.html

« Last Edit: 09/12/2013 01:13 AM by mr. mark »

Offline Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3910
  • Liked: 1232
  • Likes Given: 1047
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #116 on: 09/12/2013 01:15 AM »
To what angle with respect to the Sun's orbital plane (wrt the galaxy) and the orbital vector did it went? One would expect the limit to be closer an better defined towards the advance vector and farther and chaotic in the opposite direction. But if the Sun's magnetic field affects it, then the Sun's rotational plane should also be important, right?

For an easy to view representation look at the Heavens-Above Escaping Spacecraft page.

Edit: Oops!  Your specific question is not addressed there.  The displays are based on the ecliptic, not the galactic plane or the Sun's motion.
« Last Edit: 09/12/2013 01:17 AM by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8514
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 234
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #117 on: 09/12/2013 11:39 AM »
NASA TO ANNOUCE TOMORROW THAT VOYAGER 1 LEFT SOLAR SYSTEM 1 YEAR AGO!  ;D

Better late, than never ... and by the way Happy belated First birthday!!!
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline jebbo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 366
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 88
  • Likes Given: 89
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #118 on: 09/12/2013 11:58 AM »
On the specific question (and on the direction of the interstellar wind which is tangentially related to when V1/V2 leave/have left the solar system), see:

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/interstellar-wind-changed-direction-over-40-years/

As Sirius is at 6h 45m right ascension, I *think* you can work out the direction of the various space craft from the RAs given on the page linked in the previous post.

Edit: the sun is moving roughly towards Vega RA 18h 36m 56s, Dec 38 degrees 47
« Last Edit: 09/12/2013 12:01 PM by jebbo »

Offline dsmillman

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1279
  • Liked: 42
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #119 on: 09/12/2013 03:13 PM »
September 12, 2013
Dwayne Brown
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
DC Agle/Jia-Rui Cook
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011 / 818-354-0850
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / jia-rui.c.cook@jpl.nasa.gov/
 
MEDIA ADVISORY M13-147

NASA News Conference Today To Discuss Voyager Spacecraft

NASA will host a news conference today at 2 p.m. EDT (11 a.m. PDT), to discuss NASA's Voyager mission.
It is related to a paper to be published in the journal Science, which is embargoed until 2 p.m. EDT.

The briefing will be held at NASA Headquarters at 300 E St. SW in Washington and air live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

Media may ask questions from participating NASA centers or by telephone. To participate by phone, reporters must send an email providing name, media affiliation and telephone number to Steve Cole at stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov, or 202-358-0918 by 1:45 p.m.

After the embargo lifts at 2 p.m., media and the public may send questions via Twitter to #AskNASA.
For NASA TV streaming video, scheduling and downlink information, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

The event will also be streamed live on Ustream when the embargo lifts at:
http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

For information about the Voyager mission, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/voyager

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #120 on: 09/12/2013 06:12 PM »
Voyager Reaches Intersteller Space

Published on Sep 12, 2013
After decades of exploration, Voyager 1 reaches a historic milestone for mankind--interstellar space. Learn how the team discovered the craft had reached the space between the stars.



Published on Sep 12, 2013
Neil deGrasse Tyson, Wil Wheaton, Carl Sagan's son and others share messages to the Voyager 1 spacecraft.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline Targeteer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3603
  • near hangar 18
  • Liked: 795
  • Likes Given: 377
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #121 on: 09/12/2013 06:16 PM »
A convenient solar flare helped stir up the plasma and allow surrogate instruments to determine the spacecraft was in fact in interstellar space.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline TheFallen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 773
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 101
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #122 on: 09/12/2013 06:25 PM »
This is obviously terrific news! We're halfway there (just kidding...more like a thousandth of a way there) to making Star Trek and/or Star Wars a reality. Congrats to NASA JPL and the Voyager team!

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #123 on: 09/12/2013 06:46 PM »
Good to see this currently the most read story on the BBC news website.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24026153

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #124 on: 09/12/2013 06:53 PM »
Sept 12, 2013

RELEASE 13-280
NASA Spacecraft Embarks on Historic Journey into Interstellar Space
Quote
NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft officially is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. The 36-year-old probe is about 12 billion miles (19 billion kilometers) from our sun.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/september/nasa-spacecraft-embarks-on-historic-journey-into-interstellar-space/#.UjIMxMbVDiU
« Last Edit: 09/12/2013 06:54 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #125 on: 09/12/2013 07:00 PM »
So, at long last it has been confirmed and Voyager 1 truly enters something that has been theoretically postulated but never actually sampled by any human-made tool - the interstellar medium.  From this moment forward, the team at JPL are literally in the unknown.  Every bit of data will be unprecedented.
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #126 on: 09/12/2013 07:02 PM »
I notice the Voyager NASA web page now says interstellar mission.

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7366
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1519
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #127 on: 09/12/2013 07:03 PM »
I notice the Voyager NASA web page now says interstellar mission.

It said that for a long time already.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #128 on: 09/12/2013 07:15 PM »

I notice the Voyager NASA web page now says interstellar mission.

It said that for a long time already.

Haven't looked for a little while.

I wonder when it is calculated to encounter the Oort Cloud.

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #129 on: 09/12/2013 07:20 PM »
The Oort Cloud is a highly speculative region of space. A region of shared material between neighboring stars. It has not even been shown to exist. So until there is positive verification, I wouln't put much into it.

Offline John44

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3812
  • Netherlands
    • space-multimedia
  • Liked: 151
  • Likes Given: 0

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #131 on: 09/12/2013 07:46 PM »
It's official.  Voyager 1 is humanity's first starship.  Congratulations!

It's on a trajectory to reach within 1.7 light years of star - AC+79 3888 40,000 years from now. 

And here's an image of Voyager 1 "out there" from the NRAO:

http://www.nrao.edu/pr/2013/voyager/

Today is a historic day.  Our first reach into interstellar space.
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #132 on: 09/13/2013 05:19 AM »
Oort Cloud question. If the Oort cloud is actually there, why hasn't any of it's material eclipsed any visual observations of stars? If all this material is there it should have shown up in observations by now.   
« Last Edit: 09/13/2013 05:21 AM by mr. mark »

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #133 on: 09/13/2013 05:28 AM »
Oort Cloud question. If the Oort cloud is actually there, why hasn't any of it's material eclipsed any visual observations of stars? If all this material is there it should have shown up in observations by now.
It's incredibly diffuse and far away, up to a light year.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #134 on: 09/13/2013 05:38 AM »
That's if it exists at all. I'm not so sure.

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #135 on: 09/13/2013 05:41 AM »
That's if it exists at all. I'm not so sure.
It's based on studying the orbits of long-period comets.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #136 on: 09/13/2013 06:46 AM »

That's if it exists at all. I'm not so sure.
It's based on studying the orbits of long-period comets.

I found my answer on this & it appears to be 300 years. Interestingly I noticed a number of the articles about this news were updated to include a mention of the Oort Cloud as the actual boundary point of the Solar System & also where the influence of gravity from other stars overtakes that of the Sun.

Offline TheFallen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 773
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 101
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #137 on: 09/13/2013 05:20 PM »
Voyager 1 should arrive at the Oort Cloud in 300 years, and exit it in 30,000 years. Obvious comment of the day: Space is huge.

Offline mr. mark

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1994
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #138 on: 09/13/2013 05:34 PM »
What the theory also states is the that the Oort cloud is made up of shared material with other neighboring stars so if you were traveling to the nearest star system you would not pass through a boundary instead it would be shared between star systems. I have a feeling that long period comets do not make up enough material to make up a "cloud" of material. How do we know that there is a cloud at all. It could be that interstellar space is littered with space junk from the formation of stars and our galaxy and once our sun's gravitational pull intersects with those objects they are captured.
« Last Edit: 09/13/2013 05:35 PM by mr. mark »

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #139 on: 09/13/2013 06:26 PM »
What the theory also states is the that the Oort cloud is made up of shared material with other neighboring stars so if you were traveling to the nearest star system you would not pass through a boundary instead it would be shared between star systems. I have a feeling that long period comets do not make up enough material to make up a "cloud" of material. How do we know that there is a cloud at all. It could be that interstellar space is littered with space junk from the formation of stars and our galaxy and once our sun's gravitational pull intersects with those objects they are captured.
The comets would be going FAR faster if you were right. So far, pretty much everything seems to be coming in at about solar escape velocity, not with extra velocity due to the Sun's motion with respect to nearby stars (which is about 20km/s).
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #140 on: 09/14/2013 03:51 AM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?

Offline Bubbinski

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #141 on: 09/14/2013 05:41 AM »
I have also been wondering about something re: interstellar space and Voyager's results reported so far.  There was a big uptick in cosmic rays when she broke through to the other side.

Question: What would happen if you were to magically put, say, the ISS, right where Voyager 1 is now.  With what we know, would the crew of ISS survive okay in interstellar space, or is the radiation environment not habitable?
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #142 on: 09/14/2013 02:47 PM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?
Pu238 decay is equal for everybody. In fact, new production might not even be that pure, since they might mix new batches with old (couple of dacades of decay). And, if I remember correctly, the SiGe thermoucouples are no longer available. But I guess that would only mean more mass. If more mass is acceptable, you could use Americum-241, which has a half life of over 400 years, but requires a bit more shielding and has worse specific energy. But that's just the power issues. Voyager use core memory, which is impervious to radiation. I don't think modern electronics are upto a 80year tolerance to deep space radiation. Nor modern sensors.

Offline a_langwich

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 735
  • Liked: 211
  • Likes Given: 48
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #143 on: 09/14/2013 09:39 PM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?

If you just look at the power question, it's easy:  doubling the size of the RTG, or halving the power budget, would double the useful lifetime.  But getting all the components to last even as long as the Voyagers have is exceedingly tough.

Examining the New Horizons probe is instructive.  There's a history of it and various other predecessor proposals for Pluto / Kuiper Belt probes at http://www.boulder.swri.edu/pkb/ssr/ssr-intro.pdf .  In particular, the Voyagers massed 722 kg and had a 420 W power budget, while New Horizons massed 428 kg and had a 228 W power budget. 

That history describes several wild swings during the history of proposed Pluto probes.  At one point, a NASA group (PFF) was trying to hit a total spacecraft size of 50 kg, with 9 kg for science instruments, but the size ballooned to 140 kg total, still only 9 kg for science.  :(  Pluto Express, or Pluto-Kuiper Express, was a follow-on design for a 175 kg spacecraft, still only 9 kg for the science payload.  The New Horizons proposal added mass to get the science instrument mass budget to around 30 kg.  That allowed many redundant systems to be added, which increases reliability via backups.  It also allowed the use of more conservative designs, which may increase reliability a bit, but is essential for getting the project approved, helping it through the Hall of Whirling Axes budget process, and avoiding cost overruns which would send it back to the Hall of Whirling Axes.

Maybe I should note that the New Horizons power budget was not designed to be as small as possible, but was designed to fit a particular RTG they were offered by NASA, and maximize the amount of science produced (~ power usage) for that power budget, which of course is getting smaller over time.

Voyager's primary mission lasted 3 years, so I imagine that was its primary design lifetime.  Asking if we could now design a probe to last longer than the 36 years we've been exceedingly lucky to get, is tackling a design problem orders of magnitude harder than Voyager's design.  It assumes that if we launched an exact duplicate of Voyager, we'd get the same lifetime, and that's probably unlikely.  A very similar argument could be made about designing a Mars rover to last longer than Opportunity. 

I think New Horizons' targeted lifetime is about 15 years, which is similar to GEO satellites, which to my knowledge is about the longest time frame for which electronic systems are designed to last without any parts replacement.


Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 27019
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6911
  • Likes Given: 4873
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #144 on: 09/14/2013 09:49 PM »
I would argue that amount of science produced is more proportional to the logarithm of the power available, but that's just me. ;)
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #145 on: 09/15/2013 12:22 AM »
Thanks for the responses guys.

And here's Chris Gebhardt's feature article on the historic announcement:

Into the unknown: Voyager 1 begins interstellar space adventure
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/09/the-unknown-voyager-1-begins-interstellar-space-adventure/
Hosted thread: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32856.0

Offline joek

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2780
  • Liked: 534
  • Likes Given: 326
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #146 on: 09/15/2013 04:13 AM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?

As others have suggested, essentially as long as there is sufficient power.  Hard to compare the RTG's then with what might be fielded today.  Rad hardening is much better understood now than then.  Today's components would allow at least as much, if not more, rad resistance and resiliency as then.

Also depends on whether you intend to retrace Voyager's path, and specifically Jupiter encounter.  (Arguably we only really started to understand what "rad hard" meant in practice for outer planet missions, and develop the discipline to deal with it, after Pioneer 10 Jupiter encounter when it became apparent just how nasty it can be.)  Beyond that, providing a good thermal environment for the electronics (which for some configurations depends on electric power) appears to be a key element in prolonging life.

I'm not sure how much people appreciate that it was not so much the technology per-se at that time that has allowed Voyager to survive, but the selection and application of the available technology, and the amount of rework that was required after the results from Pioneer 10's Jupiter encounter were received, which arguably resulted in Voyager overbuilt for the perceived hazards.

In short, if Voyager was built today, using today's available technology (power being the wildcard), and with a similarly paranoid attitude towards the unknown, then I have no doubt it would last at least as long, and likely far longer.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #147 on: 09/15/2013 12:42 PM »
I'm still not convinced current electronics can be more rad hard than those. At least I'm pretty sure that memony isn't. Core memory is a hand weaved matrix of wires and metallic rings. The feature size is measured in 0.1mm. In those sizes cosmic rays are simply not an issue. Thermal and vibration would be critical, though. Regarding processing, yes, current IC might be better.
But, the critical issue would be how would you get to the final acceleration. GA at Jupiter are hard (thermal, magnetic and radiation wise).

Offline ugordan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7366
    • My mainly Cassini image gallery
  • Liked: 1519
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #148 on: 09/15/2013 12:47 PM »
At least I'm pretty sure that memony isn't.

Cassini was one of the first planetary missions to use solid state memory and has been in space for 16 years now. I remember one episode with a bad memory sector during that time, but that seems to have been it. I don't see why radiation would be a showstopper for a 30+ year mission.

Offline Bob Shaw

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 974
  • Liked: 363
  • Likes Given: 339
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #149 on: 09/15/2013 01:05 PM »
The early circumsolar Pioneers (late 60s) lasted longer than the Voyagers, with mid 1960s electronics and solar cells. I seem to recall that they were being listened to now and again until quite recently. Like outer planet Pioneers they were spin stabilised particles and fields spacecraft. I don't think they even had a tape recorder (generally the weak spot in early US efforts, that and batteries). There are several other ancient spacecraft out there, still ticking away in the sunshine.

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #150 on: 09/15/2013 01:39 PM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?
Most of the responses are missing the problem. It's not the size of the RTG or the half-life of the P238 that's Voyager's limiting factor. It's the degrading thermocouples in the RTGs that are reducing their output. The ones now days, like in New Horizons, are much better in that respect and shouldn't be a problem, so it should maintain power levels much longer. And electronics don't really wear out. The probe could very well be functional 60 years from now. Comms range might be the limit. New Horizons has a smaller and lower gain antenna than Voyager. Taking a wild-ass guess that the receiver is about 3db more sensitive than Voyager's, they should have about the same receive range. I don't know New Horizon's output power on the high gain dish so can't guess the transmit range.  But I assume the DSN will continue to improve over the next half century, so 60 years isn't out of the question.
 Of course, running out of fuel for desaturating reaction wheels could screw up that whole estimate. But I assume it won't need much of that since it probably won't be doing that much pointing after it's hoped for encounter with some Kuiper Belt object after Pluto.
« Last Edit: 09/15/2013 01:44 PM by Nomadd »

Offline jebbo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 366
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 88
  • Likes Given: 89
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #151 on: 09/15/2013 05:26 PM »
And electronics don't really wear out.

Actually at small process geometries they can thanks to electromigration.  However, I agree with your basic point. This is a well known issue and all design tools check for minimum lifetimes, etc.  Actually, now I'm wondering if the thermocouple degradation is due to this . . . wasn't as well understood back then.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #152 on: 07/08/2014 07:15 PM »
Sun Sends More 'Tsunami Waves' to Voyager 1

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced a new "tsunami wave" from the sun as it sails through interstellar space. Such waves are what led scientists to the conclusion, in the fall of 2013, that Voyager had indeed left our sun's bubble, entering a new frontier.
"Normally, interstellar space is like a quiet lake," said Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, the mission's project scientist since 1972. "But when our sun has a burst, it sends a shock wave outward that reaches Voyager about a year later. The wave causes the plasma surrounding the spacecraft to sing."
Data from this newest tsunami wave generated by our sun confirm that Voyager is in interstellar space -- a region between the stars filled with a thin soup of charged particles, also known as plasma. The mission has not left the solar system -- it has yet to reach a final halo of comets surrounding our sun -- but it broke through the wind-blown bubble, or heliosphere, encasing our sun. Voyager is the farthest human-made probe from Earth, and the first to enter the vast sea between stars.
"All is not quiet around Voyager," said Don Gurnett of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, the principal investigator of the plasma wave instrument on Voyager, which collected the definitive evidence that Voyager 1 had left the sun's heliosphere. "We're excited to analyze these new data. So far, we can say that it confirms we are in interstellar space."
Our sun goes through periods of increased activity, where it explosively ejects material from its surface, flinging it outward. These events, called coronal mass ejections, generate shock, or pressure, waves. Three such waves have reached Voyager 1 since it entered interstellar space in 2012. The first was too small to be noticed when it occurred and was only discovered later, but the second was clearly registered by the spacecraft's cosmic ray instrument in March of 2013.
Cosmic rays are energetic charged particles that come from nearby stars in the Milky Way galaxy. The sun's shock waves push these particles around like buoys in a tsunami. Data from the cosmic ray instrument tell researchers that a shock wave from the sun has hit.
Meanwhile, another instrument on Voyager registers the shock waves, too. The plasma wave instrument can detect oscillations of the plasma electrons.
"The tsunami wave rings the plasma like a bell," said Stone. "While the plasma wave instrument lets us measure the frequency of this ringing, the cosmic ray instrument reveals what struck the bell -- the shock wave from the sun."
This ringing of the plasma bell is what led to the key evidence showing Voyager had entered interstellar space. Because denser plasma oscillates faster, the team was able to figure out the density of the plasma. In 2013, thanks to the second tsunami wave, the team acquired evidence that Voyager had been flying for more than a year through plasma that was 40 times denser than measured before -- a telltale indicator of interstellar space.
Why is it denser out there? The sun's winds blow a bubble around it, pushing out against denser matter from other stars.
Now, the team has new readings from a third wave from the sun, first registered in March of this year. These data show that the density of the plasma is similar to what was measured previously, confirming the spacecraft is in interstellar space. Thanks to our sun's rumblings, Voyager has the opportunity to listen to the singing of interstellar space -- an otherwise silent place.
Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, were launched 16 days apart in 1977. Both spacecraft flew by Jupiter and Saturn. Voyager 2 also flew by Uranus and Neptune. Voyager 2, launched before Voyager 1, is the longest continuously operated spacecraft and is expected to enter interstellar space in a few years.
JPL, a division of Caltech, built and operates the twin Voyager spacecraft. The Voyagers Interstellar Mission is a part of NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. NASA's Deep Space Network, managed by JPL, is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions and radio and radar astronomy observations for the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The network also supports selected Earth-orbiting missions. The spacecraft's nuclear batteries were provided by the Department of Energy.
For more information on the Voyager mission, visit:
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov
Whitney Clavin (818) 354-4673
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
whitney.clavin@jpl.nasa.gov

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/sun-sends-tsunami-waves-20140707/index.html#.U7xC7WK9KK0
« Last Edit: 07/08/2014 07:17 PM by Star One »

Offline Liss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 909
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Liked: 109
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #153 on: 07/09/2014 09:09 AM »
Finally found the Launch Press Kit for Voyager 1 & 2. Enjoy :-)
« Last Edit: 03/05/2017 06:23 PM by Liss »
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline Nomadd

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2578
  • Boca Chica, Texas
  • Liked: 3130
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #154 on: 11/01/2015 12:44 PM »
Talk about a seldom visited thread. Cassini, Opportunity and Odyssey get lots of press for their incredibly long lived missions, but this old girl humbles them all and still makes the news.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/10/31/study-answers-lingering-questions-about-voyager-1-in-interstella/
« Last Edit: 11/01/2015 12:47 PM by Nomadd »

Offline jgoldader

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 672
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 132
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #155 on: 11/02/2015 08:30 PM »
FWIW, Voyager 2's cosmic ray counts are doing very weird things the last couple of weeks.  Recent data for two channels are shown at http://voyager.gsfc.nasa.gov/heliopause/recenthist.html.  The high energy  (>70 MeV/nucleon) channel is dropping fast after a pretty constant rate of increase, and the low-energy channel is also dropping after a recent ~50% climb.  This is not like what V1 saw as it crossed the heliopause, but is pretty unusual; I watch the page frequently and don't remember seeing this behavior before.
Recovering astronomer

Offline YesRushGen

  • Member
  • Posts: 83
  • Liked: 7
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #156 on: 11/03/2015 01:27 PM »
Here is another recent article related to the Voyagers:

Why NASA Needs a Programmer Fluent In 60-Year-Old Languages

Offline LouScheffer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1554
  • Liked: 1732
  • Likes Given: 197
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #157 on: 11/05/2015 02:32 PM »
A good question from a friend of mine....

If Voyager was made today, using today's technology, how long do you think you could keep it going, given Voyager is expected to power off completely in 10-15 years or so?
[...] Comms range might be the limit. New Horizons has a smaller and lower gain antenna than Voyager. Taking a wild-ass guess that the receiver is about 3db more sensitive than Voyager's, they should have about the same receive range. I don't know New Horizon's output power on the high gain dish so can't guess the transmit range.
The receive range for any deep space mission will almost never be the limiting factor.  Comparing uplink and downlink, the product of the two antenna gains and the free-space loss are identical (by reciprocity).  So you only need to compare receiver noise and transmit power.  The receiver on the spacecraft is not cryogenically cooled, so might have a noise temperature of 300K, perhaps 10x worse than the downlink receiver.  But the transmitter on the ground is about 1000x stronger than that on the spacecraft (20 KW vs 20 watts).  So overall the uplink margin should be about 100x the downlink margin.

And if you don't need fast data, the downlink ranges are really large.  Here'a an estimate by JPL showing that if they drop the data rate to 40 bits/sec, they can receive Voyager until 2057, on their smaller antennas (and in theory, they'd get twice this range with the bigger antenna, or an array of 4 smaller ones.).  http://descanso.jpl.nasa.gov/DPSummary/Descanso4--Voyager_new.pdf  .  So almost surely something else (like running out of power) will give out first.

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #158 on: 10/03/2016 04:44 AM »
Voyager 2 Saturn Flyby in 1981 (1986) NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

Jeff Quitney

Published on Oct 1, 2016

"AL HIBBS, DR. EDWARD STONE, DR. BRAD SMITH, DR. DANIEL GAUTIER, AND DR. ANDRE BRAHIC, SCIENTISTS, JET PROPULSION LABORATORY, DISCUSS THE DISCOVERY OF NEW MOONS, ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION... SHOWS RECENT VOYAGER PHOTOGRAPHS."

Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound.

The Voyager 2 spacecraft is a 722-kilogram (1,592 lb) space probe launched by NASA on August 20, 1977 to study the outer Solar System and eventually interstellar space. Operating for 34 years, 7 months and 2 days as of today (22 March 2012), the spacecraft receives routine commands and transmits data back to the Deep Space Network.

Part of the Voyager program with its identical sister craft Voyager 1, the spacecraft is currently in extended mission, tasked with locating and studying the boundaries of the Solar System, including the Kuiper belt, the heliosphere and interstellar space. The primary mission ended December 31, 1989 after encountering the Jovian system in 1979, Saturnian system in 1980, Uranian system in 1986, and the Neptunian system in 1989. It was the first probe to provide detailed images of the outer gas giants...

Conceived in the 1960s, a Grand Tour proposal to study the outer planets, prompted NASA to begin work on a mission in the early 1970s. The development of the interplanetary probes coincided with an alignment of the planets, making possible a mission to the outer Solar System by taking advantage of the then-new technique of gravity assist.

It was determined that utilizing gravity assists would enable a single probe to visit the four gas giants (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) while requiring a minimal amount of propellant and a shorter transit duration between planets. Originally, Voyager 2 was planned as Mariner 12 of the Mariner program however, due to congressional budget cuts, the mission was scaled back to be a flyby of Jupiter and Saturn, and renamed the Mariner Jupiter-Saturn probes. As the program progressed, the name was later changed to Voyager as the probe designs began to differ greatly from previous Mariner missions.

Upon a successful flyby of the Saturnian moon Titan, by Voyager 1, Voyager 2 would get a mission extension to send the probe on towards Uranus and Neptune...

Spacecraft design

Constructed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Voyager 2 included 16 hydrazine thrusters, three-axis stabilization, gyroscopes and celestial referencing instruments (Sun sensor/Canopus Star Tracker) to maintain pointing of the high-gain antenna toward Earth. Collectively these instruments are part of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) along with redundant units of most instruments and 8 backup thrusters. The spacecraft also included 11 scientific instruments to study celestial objects as it traveled through space.

Communications

Built with the intent for eventual interstellar travel, Voyager 2 included a large, 3.7-meter parabolic, high-gain antenna (see diagram) to transceive data with the Deep Space Network on Earth. Communications are conducted over the S-band (13 cm wavelength) and X-band (3.6 cm wavelength) providing bandwidth as high as 115.2 kilobits per second. When the spacecraft is unable to communicate with Earth, the Digital Tape Recorder (DTR) is able to record up to 62,500-kilobytes of data to later transmit when communication is reestablished.

Power

The spacecraft was built with 3 Multihundred-Watt radioisotope thermoelectric generators (MHW RTG). Each RTG includes 24 pressed plutonium oxide spheres and provide enough heat to generate approximately 157 watts of power at launch. Collectively, the RTGs supply the spacecraft with 470 watts at launch and will allow operations to continue until at least 2020...

Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jgv0JNJjzYM?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Liss

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 909
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Liked: 109
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #159 on: 03/05/2017 06:40 PM »
There is a nice set of Voyager weekly status reports from January 1995 till January 2015 at http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/weekly-reports/ .
I wonder if an archive of earlier weekly reports exists. Judging from the number #845 at the 6 Jan 1995 report, they started at launch in 1977 or soon after.
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline V-2

  • Member
  • Posts: 1
  • The Kármán Line
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #160 on: 03/25/2017 03:59 PM »
And this year (come Summer) marks the incredible 40th Anniversary of the little space probes-that-could. Crazy to think they were launched an entire decade prior to my birth. Absolute nails. I'm also ridiculously envious of those who got to experience and enjoy the endless list of achievements to their name as they were happening.

JPL has practically written the book - literally and figuratively - on interplanetary space exploration with the design and operation of the spacecraft they're responsible for as well as the network to track and communicate with them, but this flagship mission here undoubtedly takes the cake. It's so endearing to see them still listed as a current/active mission all these decades on and to still have their original Project Scientist, Professor Edward C. Stone maintaining a position he's held since 1972, five years prior to launch.

From returning more scientific data by 1989 than you could fill 6,000 editions of Encyclopedia Britannica with, to accomplishing the famed Grand Tour of outer planetary exploration with gusto including being the first-and-only direct exploration of both Uranus and Neptune, to being the first-and-only probe(s) to cross into Interstellar Space, providing the legend and unforgettable perspective that is 'The Pale Blue Dot', to the raw touch of humanity they carry on board to the stars with the Golden Record.

I'd highly recommend the short documentary (45 Min) aired by SCI last year if you haven't seen it yet. I'm not necessarily the biggest fan of the entertainment-first approach to some of their material, but they absolutely nailed this IMO, just massively inspiring stuff all-around.

History of the Voyager Mission [Doc]


« Last Edit: 03/25/2017 04:45 PM by V-2 »

Offline fthomassy

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 150
  • Austin, Texas
  • Liked: 87
  • Likes Given: 1021
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #161 on: 03/25/2017 10:46 PM »
Welcome!  Thanks for the excellent first post V-2.
gyatm . . . Fern

Online MATTBLAK

  • Elite Veteran & 'J.A.F.A'
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3791
  • 'Space Cadets' Let us; UNITE!! (crickets chirping)
  • New Zealand
  • Liked: 733
  • Likes Given: 1385
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #162 on: 03/25/2017 11:28 PM »
The Voyagers were amazing achievements - pushing the then state-of-the-art for deep space communications, navigation and automation. Pushing the boundaries and then busting right through those boundaries!
"Those who can't, Blog".   'Space Cadets' of the World - Let us UNITE!! (crickets chirping)

Offline Archibald

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2070
  • Liked: 213
  • Likes Given: 583
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #163 on: 03/26/2017 07:56 AM »
With the passing of Chuck Berry this week, it should be reminded that both Voyager are carrying Johnny B. Goode into the galaxy, thanks to Carl Sagan.
« Last Edit: 03/26/2017 07:56 AM by Archibald »

Offline AegeanBlue

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Raleigh
  • Liked: 93
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #164 on: 04/25/2017 06:46 PM »
NASA’s Cassini, Voyager Missions Suggest New Picture of Sun’s Interaction with Galaxy

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasa-s-cassini-voyager-missions-suggest-new-picture-of-sun-s-interaction-with-galaxy

The Greek solar mafia strikes again

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #165 on: 04/26/2017 09:30 AM »
That's an interesting revelation re.: the solar magnetic field and its interaction with the galactic magnetic field.

Maybe someone with a better understanding of this field can answer but does this mean that the difference in 'velocities' between the sun and the galactic magnetic field are higher and lower than previously theorised? In either case, what implications would there be for interstellar travel in both technical and flight environment terms? After all, a high-energy interstellar medium could be far more dangerous in terms of high-energy heavy metal nuclei being focussed along the field lines.
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #166 on: 08/01/2017 09:39 AM »
July 31, 2017
RELEASE 17-068

NASA’s Voyager Spacecraft Still Reaching for the Stars After 40 Years

Humanity’s farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, achieve 40 years of operation and exploration this August and September. Despite their vast distance, they continue to communicate with NASA daily, still probing the final frontier.

Their story has not only impacted generations of current and future scientists and engineers, but also Earth’s culture, including film, art and music. Each spacecraft carries a Golden Record of Earth sounds, pictures and messages. Since the spacecraft could last billions of years, these circular time capsules could one day be the only traces of human civilization.

“I believe that few missions can ever match the achievements of the Voyager spacecraft during their four decades of exploration,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters. “They have educated us to the unknown wonders of the universe and truly inspired humanity to continue to explore our solar system and beyond.”

The Voyagers have set numerous records in their unparalleled journeys. In 2012, Voyager 1, which launched on Sept. 5, 1977, became the only spacecraft to have entered interstellar space. Voyager 2, launched on Aug. 20, 1977, is the only spacecraft to have flown by all four outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Their numerous planetary encounters include discovering the first active volcanoes beyond Earth, on Jupiter’s moon Io; hints of a subsurface ocean on Jupiter’s moon Europa; the most Earth-like atmosphere in the solar system, on Saturn’s moon Titan; the jumbled-up, icy moon Miranda at Uranus; and icy-cold geysers on Neptune's moon Triton.

Though the spacecraft have left the planets far behind – and neither will come remotely close to another star for 40,000 years – the two probes still send back observations about conditions where our Sun's influence diminishes and interstellar space begins.

Voyager 1, now almost 13 billion miles from Earth, travels through interstellar space northward out of the plane of the planets. The probe has informed researchers that cosmic rays, atomic nuclei accelerated to nearly the speed of light, are as much as four times more abundant in interstellar space than in the vicinity of Earth. This means the heliosphere, the bubble-like volume containing our solar system's planets and solar wind, effectively acts as a radiation shield for the planets. Voyager 1 also hinted that the magnetic field of the local interstellar medium is wrapped around the heliosphere.

Voyager 2, now almost 11 billion miles from Earth, travels south and is expected to enter interstellar space in the next few years. The different locations of the two Voyagers allow scientists to compare right now two regions of space where the heliosphere interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium using instruments that measure charged particles, magnetic fields, low-frequency radio waves and solar wind plasma. Once Voyager 2 crosses into the interstellar medium, they will also be able to sample the medium from two different locations simultaneously.

"None of us knew, when we launched 40 years ago, that anything would still be working, and continuing on this pioneering journey," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist based at Caltech in Pasadena, California. "The most exciting thing they find in the next five years is likely to be something that we didn't know was out there to be discovered."

The twin Voyagers have been cosmic overachievers, thanks to the foresight of mission designers. By preparing for the radiation environment at Jupiter, the harshest of all planets in our solar system, the spacecraft were well equipped for their subsequent journeys. Both Voyagers are equipped with long-lasting power supplies, as well as redundant systems that allow the spacecraft to switch to backup systems autonomously when necessary. Each Voyager carries three radioisotope thermoelectric generators, devices that use the heat energy generated from the decay of plutonium-238 – only half of it will be gone after 88 years.

Space is almost empty, so the Voyagers are not at a significant level of risk of bombardment by large objects. However, Voyager 1's interstellar space environment is not a complete void. It’s filled with clouds of dilute material remaining from stars that exploded as supernovae millions of years ago. This material doesn’t pose a danger to the spacecraft, but is a key part of the environment that the Voyager mission is helping scientists study and characterize.

Because the Voyagers' power decreases by four watts per year, engineers are learning how to operate the spacecraft under ever-tighter power constraints. And to maximize the Voyagers' lifespans, they also have to consult documents written decade’s earlier describing commands and software, in addition to the expertise of former Voyager engineers.

"The technology is many generations old, and it takes someone with 1970s design experience to understand how the spacecraft operate and what updates can be made to permit them to continue operating today and into the future," said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

Team members estimate they will have to turn off the last science instrument by 2030. However, even after the spacecraft go silent, they’ll continue on their trajectories at their present speed of more than 30,000 mph (48,280 kilometers per hour), completing an orbit within the Milky Way every 225 million years.

The Voyager spacecraft were built by JPL, which continues to operate both. The Voyager missions are part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of SMD.

For more information about the Voyager spacecraft, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/voyager

and

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #167 on: 08/04/2017 07:59 PM »
The Loyal Engineers Steering NASA’s Voyager Probes Across the Universe

Quote
As the Voyager mission is winding down, so, too, are the careers of the aging explorers who expanded our sense of home in the galaxy.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/03/magazine/the-loyal-engineers-steering-nasas-voyager-probes-across-the-universe.html

Offline LouScheffer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1554
  • Liked: 1732
  • Likes Given: 197
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #168 on: 08/05/2017 02:40 AM »
Tangled Bank Studios, the educational film arm of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has made "The Farthest—Voyager in Space", a video about Voyager for its 40th anniversary.  It's mostly about the human element, and the thrill of discovery, with sessions with many of the principal designers and operators (those still alive, of course, plus some who are dead, such as Carl Sagan). It also has lots of old videos of building, launch, and operation.  The main point, as I saw it, was how unexpected each of the planets, and particularly the many moons, turned out to be - most folks were expecting cold, dead worlds like the Earth's moon, but the discoveries could not have been more different.  For those not old enough the remember, it was like New Horizons times 4, as they went past each planet in turn.

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #169 on: 08/05/2017 02:51 AM »
Tangled Bank Studios, the educational film arm of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has made "The Farthest—Voyager in Space", a video about Voyager for its 40th anniversary.  It's mostly about the human element, and the thrill of discovery, with sessions with many of the principal designers and operators (those still alive, of course, plus some who are dead, such as Carl Sagan). It also has lots of old videos of building, launch, and operation.  The main point, as I saw it, was how unexpected each of the planets, and particularly the many moons, turned out to be - most folks were expecting cold, dead worlds like the Earth's moon, but the discoveries could not have been more different.  For those not old enough the remember, it was like New Horizons times 4, as they went past each planet in turn.

Premieres Wednesday, August 23 9/8c on PBS (USA)

http://www.pbs.org/the-farthest/home/
Tony De La Rosa

Offline david1971

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 183
  • Liked: 56
  • Likes Given: 5153
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #170 on: 08/05/2017 02:58 AM »
The Loyal Engineers Steering NASA’s Voyager Probes Across the Universe

Quote
As the Voyager mission is winding down, so, too, are the careers of the aging explorers who expanded our sense of home in the galaxy.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/03/magazine/the-loyal-engineers-steering-nasas-voyager-probes-across-the-universe.html

I was interested in this tidbit: "The three antenna dishes big enough to register them are shared, so Voyager gets only four to six hours of reception time per spacecraft per day; outside these often odd windows, their data dissipate into the ether. "

Does the DSN really give 8-12 hours of dish time a day to the Voyagers? 

Offline ChrisGebhardt

  • Assistant Managing Editor
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5441
  • ad astra scientia
  • ~1 AU
  • Liked: 2053
  • Likes Given: 336
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #171 on: 08/05/2017 03:12 AM »
The Loyal Engineers Steering NASA’s Voyager Probes Across the Universe

Quote
As the Voyager mission is winding down, so, too, are the careers of the aging explorers who expanded our sense of home in the galaxy.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/03/magazine/the-loyal-engineers-steering-nasas-voyager-probes-across-the-universe.html

I was interested in this tidbit: "The three antenna dishes big enough to register them are shared, so Voyager gets only four to six hours of reception time per spacecraft per day; outside these often odd windows, their data dissipate into the ether. "

Does the DSN really give 8-12 hours of dish time a day to the Voyagers? 

What's great is this caused me to go to the DSN page to see the current activity, and three dishes at Goldstone are current receiving and transmitting to Voyager 1. 

In terms of 8-10 hours per day, I'd venture that on average that's right and varies by day and what other operation/communication is taking place that might take precedence.

Good point here is that each of the three DSN locations have multiple dishes, so each location can multitask, as seen in the attachment.
« Last Edit: 08/05/2017 03:12 AM by ChrisGebhardt »

Offline AegeanBlue

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Raleigh
  • Liked: 93
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #172 on: 08/05/2017 07:12 AM »
I have started a thread in the historical section looking for videos of the press conferences of the original planetary encounters of the Voyagers

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43513.0

While there are live encounter videos from Uranus 1986 online, the only daily press conferences I found where those of Neptune 1989 from CSPAN and the Pale Blue Dot press conference of 1990. I did put though some 1980s historical NASA videos relating to the Voyagers at Jupiter and Saturn which the closest thing I found. If anyone has any idea where to search for the historical press conference, let me know

Offline Sam Ho

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
  • Liked: 182
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #173 on: 08/09/2017 03:51 PM »
I was interested in this tidbit: "The three antenna dishes big enough to register them are shared, so Voyager gets only four to six hours of reception time per spacecraft per day; outside these often odd windows, their data dissipate into the ether. "

Does the DSN really give 8-12 hours of dish time a day to the Voyagers? 

What's great is this caused me to go to the DSN page to see the current activity, and three dishes at Goldstone are current receiving and transmitting to Voyager 1. 

In terms of 8-10 hours per day, I'd venture that on average that's right and varies by day and what other operation/communication is taking place that might take precedence.

Good point here is that each of the three DSN locations have multiple dishes, so each location can multitask, as seen in the attachment.
The daily DSN Space Flight Operations Schedules are posted at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager/mission/status/

The Voyagers need either a 70m dish or an array of two 34m dishes to receive telemetry.  Each DSN site has one 70m and three 34m dishes, except Goldstone, which has an additional 34m dish.  Voyager 2 is far enough south that it is only visible from Canberra, giving it fewer scheduling options.

Offline Hobbes-22

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 351
  • Acme Engineering
    • Acme Engineering shop
  • Liked: 98
  • Likes Given: 74
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #174 on: 08/09/2017 07:41 PM »
IIRC the time slots for Voyager are that long because the intruments are now transmitting live data. It's not possible any more to record data and play it back later, as the data rate needed for transmission has dropped below the lowest playback speed of the tape recorder.

Offline Sam Ho

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
  • Liked: 182
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #175 on: 08/09/2017 08:07 PM »
IIRC the time slots for Voyager are that long because the intruments are now transmitting live data. It's not possible any more to record data and play it back later, as the data rate needed for transmission has dropped below the lowest playback speed of the tape recorder.
The Voyager project tries to get 16 hours per spacecraft per day of tracking.  At last report, Voyager 1 was still using the tape recorder for high-rate PWS data, as long as they can get 1.4kbps for playback, using 70+34m antennas arrayed.
Quote
Science Data Acquisition Strategy

Science data are returned to earth in real time at 160 bps. Real time data capture uses 34 meter Deep Space Network (DSN) resources with the project goal to acquire at least 16 hours per day of real time data per spacecraft. This goal is not always achieved due to the competition for DSN resources with prime mission projects and other extended mission projects.

Three times per week, Voyager 1 has 48 seconds of high rate (115.2 kbps) PWS data recorded onto the Digital Tape Recorder (DTR) for later playback. Voyager 1 has six playbacks per year. The playbacks require 70 meter and 34 meter DSN support for data capture. After transmission of the data (either real time or recorded) to JPL, it is processed and made available in electronic files to the science teams located around the country for their processing and analysis.
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager/mission/science/

Offline whitelancer64

Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #176 on: 08/09/2017 08:16 PM »
I was interested in this tidbit: "The three antenna dishes big enough to register them are shared, so Voyager gets only four to six hours of reception time per spacecraft per day; outside these often odd windows, their data dissipate into the ether. "

Does the DSN really give 8-12 hours of dish time a day to the Voyagers? 

What's great is this caused me to go to the DSN page to see the current activity, and three dishes at Goldstone are current receiving and transmitting to Voyager 1. 

In terms of 8-10 hours per day, I'd venture that on average that's right and varies by day and what other operation/communication is taking place that might take precedence.

Good point here is that each of the three DSN locations have multiple dishes, so each location can multitask, as seen in the attachment.
The daily DSN Space Flight Operations Schedules are posted at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager/mission/status/

The Voyagers need either a 70m dish or an array of two 34m dishes to receive telemetry.  Each DSN site has one 70m and three 34m dishes, except Goldstone, which has an additional 34m dish.  Voyager 2 is far enough south that it is only visible from Canberra, giving it fewer scheduling options.

Any chance we could get another big DSN dish built, perhaps in South Africa or Chile/ Argentina?
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline AegeanBlue

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Raleigh
  • Liked: 93
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #177 on: 08/09/2017 08:21 PM »
Any chance we could get another big DSN dish built, perhaps in South Africa or Chile/ Argentina?

Per the Von Karman DSN lecture, they will actually retire the 70 m antenna which is pretty close to the end of its life. Already every day they have to put in adjustments on its operations due to various mechanical issues. The idea is to replace it with arrays of 34 m antennas, rather than replace it one by one

Offline Ben the Space Brit

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6982
  • A spaceflight fan
  • London, UK
  • Liked: 548
  • Likes Given: 622
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #178 on: 08/10/2017 10:22 AM »
That still begs the question of whether NASA and the international community want to increase the southern polar DSN capacity.

Semi OT but is there operational advantages to having large arrays of smaller dishes (the VLA strategy) compared to having one big dish (the Arecebo strategy)?
« Last Edit: 08/10/2017 02:41 PM by Ben the Space Brit »
"Oops! I left the silly thing in reverse!" - Duck Dodgers

~*~*~*~

The Space Shuttle Program - 1981-2011

The time for words has passed; The time has come to put up or shut up!
DON'T PROPAGANDISE, FLY!!!

Offline Hobbes-22

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 351
  • Acme Engineering
    • Acme Engineering shop
  • Liked: 98
  • Likes Given: 74
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #179 on: 08/10/2017 01:11 PM »
That still begs the question of whether NASA and the international community want to increase the southern polar DSN capacity.

Semi OT but is there operational advantages to having large arrays of smaller dishes (the VLA strategy) compared to having one big dish (the Arieebo strategy)?

Yes. With an array, you can use the antennas separately for "nearby" probes (e.g. Mars, allowing you to communicate with several probes simultaneously), and use them in an array only when you need to.

Offline Sam Ho

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
  • Liked: 182
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #180 on: 08/11/2017 07:07 PM »
That still begs the question of whether NASA and the international community want to increase the southern polar DSN capacity.

Semi OT but is there operational advantages to having large arrays of smaller dishes (the VLA strategy) compared to having one big dish (the Arieebo strategy)?

Yes. With an array, you can use the antennas separately for "nearby" probes (e.g. Mars, allowing you to communicate with several probes simultaneously), and use them in an array only when you need to.
The end result of the DSN Aperture Enhancement Project will be five 34m antennae at each complex, and retirement of the 70m antennae.  An array of four 34m antennae works about as well as a 70m antenna, and is a lot easier to maintain.

So far, two 34m antennae (DSS-35&36) have been built in Canberra, and two more (DSS-56&53) are under construction in Madrid.

https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/services/networks/txt_daep.html
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/services/networks/txt_daep_transition.html
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/news_dss-36_operational.html
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/services/networks/DSS53_DSS56_gallery

For Mars, you can also have multiple downlinks on one antenna.  (Mars is currently the only place with multiple spacecraft, but it could work elsewhere as well.)  Obviously, MSPA is not useful for the Voyagers.
Quote
1.6.5 Multiple Spacecraft Per Antenna (DSN)
Where a multiplicity of spacecraft lie within the beamwidth of a single DSN antenna, it may be possible to capture data from two or more spacecraft simultaneously using the Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) system. MSPA decreases DSN loading and will save the project’s money (see Section 2.1.3).
https://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/files/dsn/6_NASA_MOCS_2014_10_01_14.pdf

Offline AegeanBlue

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 416
  • Raleigh
  • Liked: 93
  • Likes Given: 35
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #181 on: 08/11/2017 10:39 PM »
Talking about the DSN is not entirely of topic with Voyager, since DSN's history is tied to the Voyager. The problem with DSN is that for most of its life it has not been a line item, rather upgrades to DSN were tied to a mission finding funding to pay for them. One of the 70 m antennas, I think the one at Goldstone, is known as the Apollo antenna because it was used to receive Apollo broadcasts from the Moon. The large antennas were originally built as 64 m antennas having the Parkes Observatory as their model during the Apollo era and upgraded to 70 m in the 1980s for Voyager's flyby of Uranus. Voyager, built with 1970s technology and pretty far away does need large antennas just for receiving. It's storage capacity, both in tape and computer memory is quite limited, and it is so far that its slowest playback capacity is faster than what it can transmit. Back in the 1980s it transmited pictures in real time because they were too big to store a sufficient number on board, hence the need to upgrade the antennas. New Horizons has a weaker transmitter but a much larger storage capacity, during the encounter it mostly took observations and stored in its solid state recorder 200 times the data that Voyager 2 returned from Neptune. New Horizons can likely be programmed to store its data and transmit it in bursts when it gets too far away, and during those bursts they can likely array all DSN antennas to receive the data. After New Horizons there is simply no new mission beyond Neptune even on a decadal survey, and please correct me if I am wrong. I have been looking on the mission concepts presentations of LPSC and the most recent mission concept I remember for a mission beyond Neptune was a study on how one would work with the SLS, and that was 5 years ago. As far as I know neither heliophysics nor planetary science has such a mission as either a flagship or mid range, and it most certainly doesn't fit on a Discovery budget. I remember that once Alan Stern submitted a Discovery proposal for Pluto on a Titan and it was shot down by NASA HQ because they did not intend to pay for the most expensive launcher for Discovery.

Offline Sam Ho

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
  • Liked: 182
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #182 on: 08/12/2017 02:28 AM »
As I mentioned a few posts ago, Voyager 1 still conducts a Digital Tape Recorder playback about once every two months, using a 70m+34m antenna array.

The Voyager telecommunication system has a fairly limited set of choices at low rates. The slowest DTR playback rate is 1400bps. Below that is 160bps real-time science, which is currently the main mode used, and then 40bps engineering.

https://descanso.jpl.nasa.gov/monograph/series13/DeepCommo_Chapter3--141029.pdf

By contrast, New Horizons is much more flexible. NH can send telemetry at speeds down to 6bps, and the solid state recorder does not have a minimum playback speed. While the burst mode you suggest is certainly possible, it would be much easier to stream data slowly at whatever rate the link supports for however long it takes. NH took 15 months to send back the Pluto encounter data, at a data rate of around 1kbps.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8146
  • UK
  • Liked: 1314
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #183 on: 08/18/2017 11:53 AM »
How Nasa's Voyager spacecraft changed the face of UK science

Quote
Hunt himself was such a regular on Patrick Moore’s The Sky at Night television show, that he became the public face of the mission to a whole generation of UK armchair astronomers.

And it is not just the public perception of space that was changed by the Voyager images. “In those days planetary exploration was something that Nasa did and the UK didn’t really get involved in. But the fact that Garry was involved meant that other people could get involved. This has blossomed now if we think of missions like Rosetta and Cassini and the forthcoming Juice mission, all with massive UK involvement. It made us think that the UK does planets, Europe does planets – it’s not just Nasa,” says Murray.

Indeed, the United Kingdom Space Agency’s website lists 14 planetary exploration missions that the UK is working on. Most of these are through its membership of the European Space Agency. And it all started with the Voyagers.

“I think about Voyager all the time because they were the pathfinders essentially. They taught us how to send multi-instrument spacecraft to the outer solar system,” says Murray.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/2017/aug/18/how-nasas-voyager-spacecraft-changed-the-face-of-uk-science

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #184 on: 09/01/2017 03:54 AM »
Voyager 2 Trajectory through the Solar System

NASA
Published on Aug 31, 2017

This visualization tracks the trajectory of the Voyager 2 spacecraft through the solar system. Launched on August 20, 1977, it was one of two spacecraft sent to visit the giant planets of the outer solar system. Like Voyager 1, Voyager 2 flew by Jupiter and Saturn, but the Voyager 2 mission was extended to fly by Uranus and Neptune before being directed out of the solar system.

To fit the 40-year history of the mission into a short visualization, the pacing of time accelerates through most of the movie, starting at about 5 days per second at the beginning and speeding up to about 11 months per second after the planet flybys are passed.

The termination shock and heliopause are the 'boundaries' created when the plasma between the stars interacts with the plasma flowing outward from the Sun. They are represented with simple grid models and oriented so their 'nose' is pointed in the direction (Right Ascension = 17h 24m, declination = 17 degrees south) represented by more recent measurements from other missions.

Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio
https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4140

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8TA7BU2Bvo?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 894
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #185 on: 09/01/2017 03:57 AM »
Voyager 1 Trajectory through the Solar System

NASA
Published on Aug 31, 2017

This visualization tracks the trajectory of the Voyager 1 spacecraft through the solar system. Launched on September 5, 1977, it was one of two spacecraft sent to visit the giant planets of the outer solar system. Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter and Saturn before being directed out of the solar system.

To fit the 40-year history of the mission into a short visualization, the pacing of time accelerates through most of the movie, starting at about 5 days per second at the beginning and speeding up to about 11 months per second after the planet flybys are passed.

The termination shock and heliopause are the 'boundaries' created when the plasma between the stars interacts with the plasma flowing outward from the Sun. They are represented with simple grid models and oriented so their 'nose' is pointed in the direction (Right Ascension = 17h 24m, declination = 17 degrees south) represented by more recent measurements from other missions.

https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4139
Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYNIsgDrIRE?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4243
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 2840
  • Likes Given: 948
Re: NASA - Voyager 1 and 2 updates
« Reply #186 on: 09/06/2017 04:56 AM »

Tags: