Author Topic: Boeing to Design and Build Seven Medium Earth Orbit Satellites for SES  (Read 2201 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Boeing to Design and Build Seven Medium Earth Orbit Satellites for SES

The satellites will carry Boeing’s most-advanced digital payload applicable to all orbits

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Sept. 11, 2017 – Boeing [NYSE: BA] will design and build seven super-powered medium earth orbit (MEO) satellites for SES, delivering efficient high-performance data communications services to users around the world.

The O3b mPOWER satellites will include Boeing’s most-advanced digital payload technology and will be built using electronics from the flight-proven 702 satellite platform customized to support the unique MEO environment.

“With this new technology and design, Boeing is able to build satellites faster and more cost-effectively while still providing the high performance our customers have come to expect from Boeing digital satellites,” said Paul Rusnock, chairman and CEO, Boeing Satellite Systems International, Inc. “This latest digital payload design has an unprecedented level of technology integration, built-in test capability and is modular and scalable for all orbits.”

“The SES O3b mPOWER system opens a new era of connectivity, fundamentally transforming the role and capabilities of satellites,” said Karim Michel Sabbagh, president and CEO at SES. “O3b mPOWER is a unique system with exponentially more power, performance and flexibility, which sets the technology at the highest level, offering a visionaryroadmap for next generation technology.”

The satellites are designed to be launched up to four at a time in a stacked configuration, depending on the selected launch vehicle.

Starting in the 1990s, Boeing has built 12 satellites for SES. The latest, SES-15, was launched earlier this year.

For more information on Defense, Space & Security, visit www.boeing.com.
Follow us on Twitter: @BoeingDefense.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/news-releases-statements?item=130014#Closed

Offline dkovacic

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More details here: http://spacenews.com/ses-building-a-10-terabit-o3b-mpower-constellation/

So it is 10Tbps throughput. That is 3x Viasat-3 and almost up to OneWeb capacity (which seems to be 13Tbps). Also cost should be less than half the cost of OneWeb.

Offline fatjohn1408

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I've been wondering about this.
How much is this?

I have a 250 Mbit/s connection with my provider, so this would mean that the constellation can provide for 40000 customers like me, however i dont constantly use 250 Mbit/s not by a long shot.

I did find some info from cisco on global usage:
In which they assume global internet usage to be 80 something thousand petabytes/month and to rise to 195000 PB by 2021: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/complete-white-paper-c11-481360.html#_Toc484813985

A 10 terabit network would translate in 26,300 PB/month or about 13% of global usage?!
Is this true? This seems awfully much for 1 satellite company.

Offline ncb1397

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I've been wondering about this.
How much is this?

I have a 250 Mbit/s connection with my provider, so this would mean that the constellation can provide for 40000 customers like me, however i dont constantly use 250 Mbit/s not by a long shot.

I did find some info from cisco on global usage:
In which they assume global internet usage to be 80 something thousand petabytes/month and to rise to 195000 PB by 2021: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/complete-white-paper-c11-481360.html#_Toc484813985

A 10 terabit network would translate in 26,300 PB/month or about 13% of global usage?!
Is this true? This seems awfully much for 1 satellite company.

I get 280,000 PB per month for both business and consumer by 2021 which is an average of 864 terabits/s (from your website). If their network was able to run at 100% capacity 24/7, it would account for maybe 1% of internet traffic. It won't run at 100% though. It seems you forgot to translate bits into bytes. 8 bits = 1 byte.
« Last Edit: 02/10/2018 07:21 PM by ncb1397 »

Offline Oli

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More details here: http://spacenews.com/ses-building-a-10-terabit-o3b-mpower-constellation/

So it is 10Tbps throughput. That is 3x Viasat-3 and almost up to OneWeb capacity (which seems to be 13Tbps). Also cost should be less than half the cost of OneWeb.

It will also likely have a significantly higher utilization than OneWeb.

Online launchwatcher

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I've been wondering about this.
How much is this?

I have a 250 Mbit/s connection with my provider, so this would mean that the constellation can provide for 40000 customers like me, however i dont constantly use 250 Mbit/s not by a long shot.

I did find some info from cisco on global usage:
In which they assume global internet usage to be 80 something thousand petabytes/month and to rise to 195000 PB by 2021: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/complete-white-paper-c11-481360.html#_Toc484813985

A 10 terabit network would translate in 26,300 PB/month or about 13% of global usage?!
Is this true? This seems awfully much for 1 satellite company.
Well, another baseline you could compare it to is surface network capacity.

A recently laid transatlantic cable (with 8 optical fibers in each direction) has an announced capacity of 160 terabits/second:

https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/25/16359966/microsoft-facebook-transatlantic-cable-160-terabits-a-second

so making pessimistic assumptions about what that capacity number actually means, that cable would be carrying at least 10 tbits/s per fiber - perhaps running 100 wavelengths at 100 gbit/s each?

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