Author Topic: 2017 US Eclipse thread  (Read 12477 times)

Offline Star One

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #140 on: 08/24/2017 12:11 AM »

Offline Lee Jay

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #141 on: 08/24/2017 12:29 AM »
Three from me, taken from Glenrock, Wyoming.

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #142 on: 08/24/2017 03:33 AM »
Have any of the eclipse images taken by the pair of WB-57 jets being release yet?

Online litton4

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #143 on: 08/27/2017 05:33 AM »
Beautiful! I completely forgot the rights settings and even to bracket my shots, so I missed the chance to capture the solar flares/perturbances. My shots ended up too over-exposed to capture that. Nice job!

If you are really into the tech stuff, there are a few programs that will run your camera automatically during eclipses.  I used Solar Eclipse Maestro on my Macbook and can give it a big thumbs-up. For Windows, there's Eclipse Orchestrator.  I was using a telescope on a tracking equatorial mount, so had to do some minor corrections for poor polar alignment every 10 minutes or so, and make sure the focus was good.  But the software was in charge during totality, all 35 frames with varying exposures came out perfectly.

The software used ephemerides and a lunar shape model to time everything to 0.1 second or so.  I had to tell it my location (thank you, GPS!).  It even predicts Bailey's Beads using the shape model, and darned if my pictures don't look identical to the predictions.  It's a truly impressive piece of work, and I hope it's updated for 2024.

I took a look at Eclipse Orchestrator - unfortunately it doesn't support my camera - do you know how responsive they are to adding supportfor additional cameras (similar to existing ones - in my case a canon 77D)
Dave Condliffe

Offline jgoldader

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #144 on: 08/27/2017 11:36 AM »
I took a look at Eclipse Orchestrator - unfortunately it doesn't support my camera - do you know how responsive they are to adding supportfor additional cameras (similar to existing ones - in my case a canon 77D)

Sorry, I don't actually know the details of Eclipse Orchestrator.  For Macs, I believe there are issues with Canon not issuing libraries for OS X.  One program I've used for nighttime observing, Backyard EOS, does not have a Mac version for that reason.  Not sure how the author of Solar Eclipse Maestro got around that limitation.

I can't see the harm in sending a nice note to the Eclipse Orchestrator author, though.
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Offline John Alan

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #145 on: 08/27/2017 05:47 PM »
A well made summary of the day in america... posted to help cap off this great thread...


Myself... I drove 9+ hours west to 10 miles west of Arnold, NE (middle of nowhere) and just took it all in...
Left my place Sunday Noon and got back Tuesday Noon...
1625 miles driven in total... My 2015 Dodge Charger AWD Rallye loaded got 29.97mpg overall...
(sealing it's fate as the best all around road trip car I have owned to date... (full size, 300hp, 30mpg))
The 2 hours headed west from Lincoln, NE on I-80 in a convoy led by a 06 Ford GT40 (god, what a exhaust note) was a trip highlight...  8)

Fun was had... Bucket list item checked... onward...  :)
« Last Edit: 08/27/2017 06:25 PM by John Alan »

Offline jgoldader

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #146 on: 08/30/2017 11:08 PM »
Thought I'd toss out another image before everybody forgets the eclipse.  There's Bailey's Beads at second contact, 6-image composite of totality in HDR, and the diamond ring at third contact.  Shrunk down, etc.  Camera was Canon EOS Rebel T3i, telescope Celestron Omni 127 XLT Schmidt-Cassegrain with focal reducer on a CG-4 tracking mount.  Exposures taken with Solar Eclipse Maestro software.  I'm still learning how to use layers in Photoshop, so the composition is a little crude yet.
« Last Edit: 08/30/2017 11:09 PM by jgoldader »
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Offline 321_SNI

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #147 on: 09/02/2017 05:21 PM »
Thought I'd toss out another image before everybody forgets the eclipse.  There's Bailey's Beads at second contact, 6-image composite of totality in HDR, and the diamond ring at third contact.  Shrunk down, etc.  Camera was Canon EOS Rebel T3i, telescope Celestron Omni 127 XLT Schmidt-Cassegrain with focal reducer on a CG-4 tracking mount.  Exposures taken with Solar Eclipse Maestro software.  I'm still learning how to use layers in Photoshop, so the composition is a little crude yet.

Love your pic to wrap it up, jgold, the detail of the light apparently breaking through the mountains and craters etc.   Havenít looked closely, and not familiar with the viewable speed of change of flares, but do you know if the solar flares changed much during the eclipse?  Thanks again for the composite from a great event.

Offline jgoldader

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #148 on: 09/02/2017 07:03 PM »
Love your pic to wrap it up, jgold, the detail of the light apparently breaking through the mountains and craters etc.   Havenít looked closely, and not familiar with the viewable speed of change of flares, but do you know if the solar flares changed much during the eclipse?  Thanks again for the composite from a great event.

Good question!  The prominences, the red "flames," will show changes on timescales of hours.  If you found images from Oregon and compared them with ones from the east, you would see changes.  The basic shape would be the same, but the details would be noticeably different.
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Offline Star One

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2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #149 on: 09/14/2017 08:26 PM »




« Last Edit: 09/14/2017 08:28 PM by Star One »

Offline Propylox

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #150 on: 09/17/2017 08:12 AM »

The prominences, the red "flames," will show changes on timescales of hours.  If you found images from Oregon and compared them with ones from the east, you would see changes.  The basic shape would be the same, but the details would be noticeably different.
Nice pics. I'm wondering where they're taken from. Only the "4-o'clock" prominence was visible at my location and staggeringly large, even with the naked eye, while the others weren't visible. I took a day trip to just north of Scottsbluff, NE on Hwy72 and found a high spot to watch. Crystal clear skies and 360-degree horizons, of course, but specifically so I could see the advancing shadow from the west, which itself was mesmerizing for fleeting seconds.

Offline jgoldader

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Re: 2017 US Eclipse thread
« Reply #151 on: 09/19/2017 03:58 PM »
Nice pics. I'm wondering where they're taken from. Only the "4-o'clock" prominence was visible at my location and staggeringly large, even with the naked eye, while the others weren't visible. I took a day trip to just north of Scottsbluff, NE on Hwy72 and found a high spot to watch. Crystal clear skies and 360-degree horizons, of course, but specifically so I could see the advancing shadow from the west, which itself was mesmerizing for fleeting seconds.

We were in Columbia, SC, just north of the centerline.  I didn't actually notice the prominences visually, only saw them when looking at the images afterwards, though some people apparently noticed them naked-eye.  Being mainly blinded due to sunscreen gunking up my eyes wasn't conducive to clear vision, but I was able to blink enough of it away to see maybe 30 seconds of totality.  Spent about a minute scrambling to recenter my son's SLR and get some wide field views, that wasn't worth the lost totality.  Live and learn.
« Last Edit: 09/19/2017 03:59 PM by jgoldader »
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