Author Topic: Comsat news  (Read 1495 times)

Online savuporo

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Comsat news
« on: 08/13/2017 05:13 PM »
There aren't many threads on comsats anywhere here, so let's try one.

http://news.lockheedmartin.com/2017-08-10-Lockheed-Martin-Successfully-Integrates-First-Modernized-A2100-Satellite

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This milestone on a modernized A2100 satellite sees the hybrid propulsion integrated with the payload module and transponder panels. Using a combination of electrical Hall current thrusters and liquid apogee engine, the propulsion subsystem serves as the structural backbone of the satellite and is essential for maneuvering it into its final orbit as well as keeping it on station throughout its mission.

The modernized A2100 builds on a flight-proven bus that is the foundation for more than 40 satellites in orbit today. Through an internally-funded, multi-year modernization effort, Lockheed Martin has enhanced the spacecraft's power, propulsion and electronics, while also adopting the latest advanced engineering and manufacturing techniques to decrease production costs and timelines. There are five modernized A2100 satellites currently under contract to Lockheed Martin. They are designed for a host of missions and customers around the globe.

Out of those five, Hellas-Sat-4/SaudiGeoSat-1 highlighted here was awarded in 2015 and  JCSAT 17 was awarded in 2016.

Modernized A2100 represents something of a comeback for LM to comsat market.
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Online savuporo

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #1 on: 08/13/2017 05:22 PM »
Other relevant updates, first Chinese DFH-5 failed on LM-5 Shijian-18 flight.

Operational DFH-5 would be a competitive entry on global market.

Quote
The DFH-5 platform builds on China’s current-generation DFH-4 but triples its payload capacity, hosting communications packages up to 2,200 Kilograms with a payload power up to a whopping 28 Kilowatts, surpassing the most powerful commercial platforms currently on the market.

DFH-5 inaugurates innovative systems like a truss acting as structural backbone, twice-deploying solar arrays, high-thrust ion engines for orbit control and a new type of self-controlling propellant system.

http://spaceflight101.com/long-march-5-shijian-18/shijian-18/
« Last Edit: 08/13/2017 05:26 PM by savuporo »
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Online gongora

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #2 on: 08/13/2017 05:30 PM »
There aren't many threads on comsats anywhere here, so let's try one.

http://news.lockheedmartin.com/2017-08-10-Lockheed-Martin-Successfully-Integrates-First-Modernized-A2100-Satellite

There are lots of threads on comsats, they're just found in the launch vehicle mission sections  ;)

The sister satellite (not identical payloads but being built in parallel for the same owner) to the one in the picture is Arabsat 6A.

Online savuporo

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #3 on: 08/13/2017 05:55 PM »
There are lots of threads on comsats, they're just found in the launch vehicle mission sections  ;)
All focused on launchers, rarely a mention about what's happening with comsat tech and markets.

Case in point : Recent  Eutelsat 172B launch, a significant milestone for Eurostar E3000 platform

https://airbusdefenceandspace.com/newsroom/news-and-features/airbus-first-high-power-all-electric-satellite-eutelsat-172b-launched-by-ariane-5/

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“We are the first company to demonstrate full electric propulsion for satellites of this size and capacity,” said Nicolas Chamussy, Head of Space Systems at Airbus. “With this spacecraft we are clearly setting a new benchmark - enabling powerful and complex satellites to be launched in the most cost efficient manner.”

EUTELSAT 172B combines electric power of 13 kW with a launch mass of around 3,500 kg only, thanks to the latest EOR (Electric Orbit Raising) version of Airbus’ highly reliable Eurostar E3000 platform.
..
Customers can therefore either achieve a significant saving on launch costs, or a substantial increase of the payload power for a given mass. Furthermore the Hall Effect Technology used by Airbus makes transfer to the operational orbit significantly faster than other electric propulsion technologies.

Innovation solutions include two deployable robotic arms to orientate the satellite’s electric propulsion thrusters to control thrust direction and attitude during different phases of the mission. In addition, WALIS (Wide Angle Localisation Integrated System) is a proprietary network of ground stations developed by Airbus around the world, to enable Airbus engineers to control orbit raising operations until the satellite reaches geostationary orbit.

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/e/eutelsat-172b

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/873094291731513345

« Last Edit: 08/13/2017 06:19 PM by savuporo »
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Online savuporo

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #4 on: 08/14/2017 04:31 AM »
Anyone have a good explanation why mounting thrusters on robotic arms is beneficial ?
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Online TrevorMonty

Re: Comsat news
« Reply #5 on: 08/14/2017 04:54 AM »
Anyone have a good explanation why mounting thrusters on robotic arms is beneficial ?
Can control thrust direction while keeping solar panels directed at sun and antenna directed at earth.

Online savuporo

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #6 on: 08/14/2017 05:22 AM »
Anyone have a good explanation why mounting thrusters on robotic arms is beneficial ?
Can control thrust direction while keeping solar panels directed at sun and antenna directed at earth.

Thats not really a full answer. Normally the arrays are gimbaled for the same reason.
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Online LouScheffer

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #7 on: 08/14/2017 01:31 PM »
Anyone have a good explanation why mounting thrusters on robotic arms is beneficial ?
Three possibilities:  First, if what you need is torque, it's more efficient to be further from the center of mass.  Second, with fixed thrusters you need three opposing pairs to get control in all three axes.  If you can point the thrusters using the arm, you only need one pair.   Third, it could reduce the need for redundancy.  A thruster that can be pointed using the arm could substitute for any other thruster, not just one pointed in a particular direction.   

Online gongora

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #8 on: 08/19/2017 05:49 PM »
One of the NGSO constellations that has applied to the FCC is from Audacy.  They're planning something a little different from most of the other constellations:  a data relay service operating from MEO that other satellites can use for data and TT&C communications instead of communicating directly with ground stations.

[Space News] CASIS awards Audacy grant to test radio on space station
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The nonprofit Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) awarded a grant Aug. 17 to Audacy that will enable the Silicon Valley startup to demonstrate its high data-rate radio on the International Space Station.

Audacy, a company established in 2015 to create a commercial space-based communications network, plans to send the Audacy Lynq demonstration mission to the space station’s NanoRacks External Payload Platform on a NASA commercial cargo fight in late 2018.
...

[Clyde Space] Building an Out-of-this-World Continuous Communications Network
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Clyde Space, Europe’s leading manufacturer of miniature satellites, has announced a partnership with California space company Audacy.

The Stanford University spin-off company is developing a constellation of relay satellites to provide non-stop, real-time communications coverage for commercial customers in the space industry, with services similar to NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS).

Audacy will be establishing a network of data relay satellites to provide uninterrupted space connectivity, allowing customers to continuously access and monitor their assets in space. This enables satellite operators to obtain greater quantities of data, eliminate outages between data downlinks, and significantly reduce operators’ costs. The aim is similar to that of the telecoms industry -- to better connect and provide communications services to multiple users simultaneously at competitive prices.

Clyde Space is providing the spacecraft bus solution and custom on-site training for a mission demonstrating Audacy’s customer satellite terminal, which includes K-band antennas and a software-defined radio (SDR). The initial phase of the principal Audacy mission will consist of three medium Earth orbit (MEO) relay satellites due to launch in 2019 combined with ground stations in California, Singapore, and Europe. These satellites will simultaneously support numerous customer satellites with a range of missions and applications in multiple sectors from agriculture to disaster management. Timely data could help formulate preventative measures around the world aiding those most in need.

Audacy was launched in 2015 by a team of Stanford graduates, NASA award winners, and SpaceX veterans. The company has gone from strength to strength with worldwide venture capital backing and a clear vision of revolutionizing space communications to benefit humankind.

The Audacy mission is the latest project to recognize Clyde Space’s high-tech CubeSat technology and the far-reaching impact it has had in making satellites more accessible and affordable.

Its success earned it the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the Innovation Category earlier this year.

Clyde Space is backed by Scottish investment companies Coralinn LLP and Nevis Capital.
« Last Edit: 08/19/2017 05:50 PM by gongora »

Online TrevorMonty

Re: Comsat news
« Reply #9 on: 08/19/2017 07:43 PM »
Would give LEO cubesats 24/7 communications capability, without need for expensive ground stations.
« Last Edit: 08/19/2017 07:44 PM by TrevorMonty »

Online gongora

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #10 on: 08/31/2017 07:45 PM »
Press Release: Kymeta Receives Commercial Authorization from FCC and Ofcom

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Kymeta receives first-ever FCC authorization for 11,000 electronically-steered, beam-forming flat panel antenna terminals in the United States, and unlimited Ofcom authorization for antenna installation in the United Kingdom

Redmond, Washington—August 31, 2017: Kymeta Corporation has received blanket authorization from the FCC for commercial distribution of 11,000 of its KyWay™ terminals in the United States. This is the first-ever blanket license issued by the FCC for an electronically-steered, beam-forming flat panel antenna terminal, a significant milestone for the satellite communications industry at-large. It is also the first-ever blanket license issued by the FCC for any vehicle-mounted earth station terminal. Kymeta also received an indefinite-term, unlimited installation commercial license from the UK regulatory agency, Ofcom. Kymeta KyWay™ terminals will be available under these licenses for land mobile, maritime, and fixed IoT applications.

The FCC’s blanket license will allow Kymeta—the company delivering on the promise of global, mobile connectivity—to operate 5,000 vehicle-mounted Earth stations (VMEs), 5,000 fixed IoT installations, and 1,000 maritime Earth stations on vessels (ESVs).

The implications for maritime, IoT, and the automotive industry in the United States, is significant. “This is the first time electronically-steered, beam-forming flat panel antenna terminals have been given blanket authorization by the FCC,” said Nathan Kundtz, CEO and President of Kymeta. “The satellite spectrum has 5,000 times the capacity of all terrestrial networks, and that means that connected cars, construction sites, vessels, rail, buses, and other traditionally difficult-to-connect industries are now going to have the opportunity for uninterrupted access wherever they are, and wherever they go.”

The company also received authorization from Ofcom to provide service to an unlimited number of vehicle-mounted, shipboard and IoT installations in the United Kingdom. This authorization from a European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) and Electronic Communications Committee (ECC) member country is an important milestone. Ofcom’s compliance with ECC decisions regarding ESVs mean that Kymeta installations under this authority are granted free circulation in the 48 CEPT member countries.

“Free circulation in European waters means one less hurdle to overcome in the regulatory approval process,” said Håkan Olsson, Vice President of Maritime at Kymeta. “Ofcom and FCC approvals are major milestones as they enable seamless connectivity in the US, Caribbean and Europe—the most populated areas for satellite communication. We expect regulatory bodies for the rest of the world to follow suit shortly.”

Kundtz is excited about Kymeta’s future as commercial licensing authorizations in the US and the UK position the company for future approvals, taking it one step closer to providing uninterrupted mobile satellite communications to the world. “The complete Kymeta solution makes connectivity as available as the sky,” said Kundtz. “The best way to think about our antenna is that it’s like a pizza box that delivers connectivity. All you need to do is take it outside, turn it on, and you’re connected. It’s the magic pizza box that delivers the internet, and these approvals are helping us to deliver on our promise of global, mobile communication.”

About Kymeta

What’s the missing link to connecting billions of people to high-speed mobile access? Antennas. And Kymeta offers the world’s only commercially-viable electronically-scanning satellite antennas and terminals. Kymeta antennas and terminals deliver high-throughput communications for land, sea, and air, making mobile connectivity as available as a view of the sky. Plus, the world’s largest satellite operator, Intelsat, has joined forces with Kymeta to deliver KĀLO global access services that combine with Kymeta antennas and terminals to provide revolutionary mobile connectivity. Without Kymeta mTenna™ technology, connecting and staying connected to all those new satellites while on the move will be difficult, if not impossible.

If it moves, Kymeta will keep it connected. Anywhere.
For more information, visit kymetacorp.com and KALO.net.

Offline gosnold

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #11 on: 09/11/2017 06:28 PM »
Boeing has won the contract for the next-gen O3b constellation, over Thales, the manufacturer of the current one:

http://spacenews.com/ses-building-a-10-terabit-o3b-mpower-constellation/

The constellation will provide 10 Tbps, and the 7 satellites will use phased array antennas (apparently Boeing's big competitive advantage), whereas the current ones use steerable dishes.

Online savuporo

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Re: Comsat news
« Reply #12 on: 09/13/2017 02:04 PM »
Anyone have a good explanation why mounting thrusters on robotic arms is beneficial ?
Three possibilities:  First, if what you need is torque, it's more efficient to be further from the center of mass.  Second, with fixed thrusters you need three opposing pairs to get control in all three axes.  If you can point the thrusters using the arm, you only need one pair.   Third, it could reduce the need for redundancy.  A thruster that can be pointed using the arm could substitute for any other thruster, not just one pointed in a particular direction.   

All good reasons, and yet another one is possibly pointed out here:
http://spacenews.com/all-electric-satellites-halfway-to-becoming-half-of-all-satellites/
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Electric propulsion can come with trade-offs though, according Mike Glogowski, director of propulsion at Orbital ATK.

“They produce more drag in some cases, certainly for Hall [-effect]  thrusters versus, say, pure ion thrusters,” he said at the Satellite 2017 conference in March. “They can also engender erosion of surface materials, which likewise would put deposits on your spacecraft surfaces. They also have potential electro-dynamic interference effects that all have to be accounted for, and likewise they are also very expensive compared to a heritage chemical system. But even with all those features they have become quite a key offering now among many satellite prime contractors.”


I'm going to guess mounting the thrusters at the end of booms will mitigate some of those effects.
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