Author Topic: Starliner meets milestones as ULA switches Atlas booster for maiden flight  (Read 2608 times)


Offline Negan

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Is the "6 hour launch to docking profile" any more difficult because of the station's orbit, or would does that matter? Just curious if this might affect where future LEO stations would be positioned making it easier for Starliner to do.

Offline Jim

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Is the "6 hour launch to docking profile" any more difficult because of the station's orbit, or would does that matter? Just curious if this might affect where future LEO stations would be positioned making it easier for Starliner to do.

It doesn't allow for daily launch windows

Offline clongton

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Thanks Chris G. That was a good article.

I was thinking as I read it "what a difference between Starliner and Orion".
Orion started out pretty good but quickly became the victim of politics, while Starliner, even thou it had a few bumps along the road, made fairly steady progress. It's ETF is only 11 months away and manned not too far after, while Orion is still struggling.

I didn't know that the ETF vehicle would be refurbished for manned operations after its flight. You mentioned that the vehicle has a design life of 10 missions. What is the extent of the refurbishments that will need to be done between flights?
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Offline okan170

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Thanks Chris G. That was a good article.

I was thinking as I read it "what a difference between Starliner and Orion".
Orion started out pretty good but quickly became the victim of politics, while Starliner, even thou it had a few bumps along the road, made fairly steady progress. It's ETF is only 11 months away and manned not too far after, while Orion is still struggling.


Because thats a reasonable comparison...  ::)

Offline brickmack

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I didn't know that the ETF vehicle would be refurbished for manned operations after its flight. You mentioned that the vehicle has a design life of 10 missions. What is the extent of the refurbishments that will need to be done between flights?

Service module, heat shield, airbags, parachutes, forward bay cover are all fully expended, obviously. Backshell TPS is apparently Shuttle/X-37 derived, so probably reusable with minimal maintenance. Some tiles and windows may need replacement. ACS thrusters likely require little maintenance as well (the ones on the Shuttle didn't, and these ones have a simpler operating environment). Coolant, pressurant, atmospheric gas, and water tanks and plumbing will likely be purged and cleaned, plus air filters and the vehicle interior. Then test everything like you would for a new vehicle.

Because thats a reasonable comparison...  ::)

You're right, Orion started development half a decade earlier and got a blank check.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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You're right, Orion started development half a decade earlier and got a blank check.

If they had a blank cheque, Lockheed Martin would be building a Service Module (SM) and the Life Support System (LSS) now, instead of ESA doing the SM and delaying the LSS until after EM-1.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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