Author Topic: National Space Council Reestablished  (Read 20554 times)

Offline Proponent

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #140 on: 11/07/2017 12:17 AM »
It [SLS] was never slated for 2015.

Quote
(2) FLEXIBILITY.—The Space Launch System shall be designed from inception as a fully-integrated vehicle capable of carrying a total payload of 130 tons or more into low-Earth orbit in preparation for transit for missions beyond low-Earth orbit. The Space Launch System shall, to the extent practicable, incorporate capabilities for evolutionary growth to carry heavier payloads. Developmental work and testing of the core elements and the upper stage should proceed in parallel subject to appropriations. Priority should be placed on the core elements with the goal for operational capability for the core elements not later than December 31, 2016.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/outreach/nasa_auth_act_2010.pdf

A slip from December 2016 to May 2020 is 3 years and 5 months.

It was to be operational by the end of 2016; that implies test flights earlier, which the same authorization act in fact envisions.  Assuming, optimistically, the capability to fly once per year, that puts the first flight in late 2015 if not earlier.

Offline su27k

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #141 on: 11/07/2017 05:28 AM »
Yeah, unless SLS is required for some Air Force black project (heading into tinfoil hat territory with that idea), "heavy-lift rockets are strategic national assets" isn't a thing. Probably an excuse to keep the money flowing to big donors.

Agreed, it's basically a blatant attempt to make SLS uncancellable no matter what happens, even if we discover wrap drive tomorrow it would still be kept as strategic asset. Remember the national helium reserve was kept for nearly 100 years even though it's clear airship is a deadend after 10 years, I'm pretty sure Pace is trying to do the same with SLS.

Offline woods170

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #142 on: 11/07/2017 05:47 AM »
It [SLS] was never slated for 2015.

Quote
(2) FLEXIBILITY.—The Space Launch System shall be designed from inception as a fully-integrated vehicle capable of carrying a total payload of 130 tons or more into low-Earth orbit in preparation for transit for missions beyond low-Earth orbit. The Space Launch System shall, to the extent practicable, incorporate capabilities for evolutionary growth to carry heavier payloads. Developmental work and testing of the core elements and the upper stage should proceed in parallel subject to appropriations. Priority should be placed on the core elements with the goal for operational capability for the core elements not later than December 31, 2016.
https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/outreach/nasa_auth_act_2010.pdf

A slip from December 2016 to May 2020 is 3 years and 5 months.

It was to be operational by the end of 2016; that implies test flights earlier, which the same authorization act in fact envisions.  Assuming, optimistically, the capability to fly once per year, that puts the first flight in late 2015 if not earlier.
To me this appears to be all very off-topic for this thread.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #143 on: 12/05/2017 07:37 PM »
Quote
Nield: for 45-day report on regulatory reform, we turned in a list of ideas to National Space Council. Offered our vision of a 21st century launch licensing process. #SpaceComExpo
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/938143011694895110

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Nield: among the ideas include regulations that are performance based, and reviewing licensing much more quickly. #SpaceComExpo
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/938143292461592577

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Nield: if we had more people at FAA/AST (currently about 100 people) could also speed up license reviews. #SpaceComExpo
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/938143608028491777

Online AncientU

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #144 on: 12/05/2017 08:02 PM »
Anyone know when next meeting is planned?
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Online AncientU

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #145 on: 12/06/2017 12:43 PM »
FAA submits its 45-day report:
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FAA offers National Space Council ideas for launch licensing reforms
http://spacenews.com/faa-offers-national-space-council-ideas-for-launch-licensing-reforms/
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Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: National Space Council Reestablished
« Reply #146 on: 12/12/2017 01:41 PM »
Quote
Notice of establishment of the National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group.

Status Report From: NASA HQ
Posted: Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Editor's note: The call for nominations will be published on Thursday.
 
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 17–088]
National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group; Establishment

AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
 
ACTION: Notice of establishment of the National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group.
 
Pursuant to the NASA Authorization Act of 1991 (Pub. L. 101–611, Section 121), and Executive Order 13803 (‘‘Reviving The National Space Council’’), Section 6, signed by the President on June 30, 2017, NASA has established the National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group (UAG). The UAG is a non-discretionary statutory Federal advisory committee under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) (Pub. L. 92–463, as amended). NASA is sponsoring and managing the operations of the UAG on behalf of the National Space Council, Executive Office of the President. This determination follows consultation with the Committee Management Secretariat of the U.S. General Services Administration.

Purpose: The purpose of the UAG is purely advisory and shall be to ensure that the interests of industry, other nonFederal entities, and other persons involved in aeronautics and space activities are adequately represented in the deliberations of the National Space Council. The National Space Council is an Executive Branch interagency coordinating committee chaired by the Vice President, which is tasked with advising and assisting the President regarding national space policy and strategy.

Membership: Members of the UAG will serve either as ‘‘Representatives’’ (representing industry, other nonFederal entities, and other recognizable groups of persons involved in aeronautical and space activities) or ‘‘Special Government Employees’’ (individual subject matter experts).

Duration: Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the NASA Authorization Act of 1991, the UAG is not subject to Section 14a(2) of FACA, and shall exist on an ongoing basis.

Responsible NASA Official: Dr. Jeff Waksman, Designated Federal Officer/ Executive Secretary, NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546, phone: 202– 358–3758 or email: jeff.l.waksman@ nasa.gov.
 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Jeff Waksman, Designated Federal Officer/Executive Secretary, NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546, phone: 202– 358–3758 or email: jeff.l.waksman@ nasa.gov. Patricia D. Rausch, Advisory Committee Management Officer, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [FR Doc. 2017–26765 Filed 12–11–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7510–13–P

// end //

http://spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=50884


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Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 1
« Reply #148 on: 12/15/2017 04:21 AM »
These principles (distilled from Pace's remarks) seem promising, if they can actually be implemented as written. Especially the last one.

From https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/pace-outlines-trump-administrations-approach-to-space-development-and-law/

Quote
He listed seven “core elements” of the Trump Administration’s policy approach (text of his remarks).

    Support activities that advance U.S. national interests internationally.  Quoting National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster: “America first does not mean America alone.”
    Strive to be the most attractive jurisdiction in the world for private sector investment and innovation in space with a light touch of regulation.
    Use legal and diplomatic means to create a stable, peaceful environment for governmental and commercial space activities.
    Provide confidence to the private sector that it can profit from capital investments made to develop and utilize in-situ resources, commercial infrastructure and facilities in space.
    Respond to questions about how the United States registers space objects and the responsibilities of space object ownership and operation.
    Develop non-binding international norms complementary to the existing legal regime through best practices and confidence building measures — but no new treaties or international arms control agreements.
    Reject the notion that space is a “global commons” or “common heritage of mankind” or “res communis” or a public good.
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Online Zed_Noir

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Re: Trump Space Policy Directive 1
« Reply #149 on: 12/15/2017 11:03 AM »
These principles (distilled from Pace's remarks) seem promising, if they can actually be implemented as written. Especially the last one.

From https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/pace-outlines-trump-administrations-approach-to-space-development-and-law/

Quote
He listed seven “core elements” of the Trump Administration’s policy approach (text of his remarks).

    Support activities that advance U.S. national interests internationally.  Quoting National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster: “America first does not mean America alone.”
    Strive to be the most attractive jurisdiction in the world for private sector investment and innovation in space with a light touch of regulation.
    Use legal and diplomatic means to create a stable, peaceful environment for governmental and commercial space activities.
    Provide confidence to the private sector that it can profit from capital investments made to develop and utilize in-situ resources, commercial infrastructure and facilities in space.
    Respond to questions about how the United States registers space objects and the responsibilities of space object ownership and operation.
    Develop non-binding international norms complementary to the existing legal regime through best practices and confidence building measures — but no new treaties or international arms control agreements.
    Reject the notion that space is a “global commons” or “common heritage of mankind” or “res communis” or a public good.

Problem is what you replace the last element with?

Maybe the golden rule. Who ever got the gold gets to make the rules. That's what I think might happen.

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