Author Topic: LIVE: PSLV C38 - Cartosat-2E & 30 nanosats - June 23, 2017 (03:59 UTC)  (Read 31698 times)

Offline K210

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Onboard camera footage directly ripped from ISRO's site:


« Last Edit: 06/23/2017 11:10 AM by K210 »

Offline Star One

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And thus we come to the end of the launches of famed 'Cartosat 2 Series' brothers. From next year we can hopefully start seeing a new series of satellites that are appropriately named, well, 'Cartosat 3 Series'.

I wonder if as these satellites gain capabilities,  that if they have military usage we will hear & see less & less about them.

Online AncientU

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Congrats to ISRO.

This program is making huge advances all around.
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
-- SpaceX friend of mlindner

Offline sanman

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Here's a little tribute in the form of beach art from the eastern coast:

https://twitter.com/sudarsansand/status/878266275264208897


Offline input~2

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2017-036A    42765    OBJECT A    93.15min    97.13°    515km    342km
2017-036B    42766    OBJECT B    94.78min    97.45°    516km    499km
2017-036C    42767    OBJECT C    94.78min    97.45°    518km    498km

Offline vineethgk

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2017-036A    42765    OBJECT A    93.15min    97.13°    515km    342km
2017-036B    42766    OBJECT B    94.78min    97.45°    516km    499km
2017-036C    42767    OBJECT C    94.78min    97.45°    518km    498km
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/isro-upbeat-over-pslv-c38-mission-success/article19136971.ece

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Fifty-eight minutes after the rocket thundered off from the Satish Dhawan spaceport at Sriharikotta and ejected the 31 satellites into orbit, the twin engines of PS4 were first restarted. The process was repeated 46 minutes later. The third restart was scheduled about midnight after the PS4 completed nine orbits.
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“With the first and second restarts, the PS4 orbit was brought down from 505 km to 350 km,” K. Sivan, Director, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre told The Hindu from SHAR. The third reignition of the engines would involve only a change in inclination.

With its low perigee of 342 km, Object A might be PS4 perhaps?

Offline vineethgk

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Gotcha! I guess the name of this forum fooled another one..

http://m.thehindubusinessline.com/news/did-isro-just-put-a-chinese-satellite-into-orbit/article9735320.ece
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NASA’s Spaceflight.com website, which lists all payloads launched into space, says one of the QB50 satellites belonged to China’s National University of Defence Technology. “The two satellites which carry INMS (Ion-Neutral Mass Spectrometer) payloads are NUDTSat for China’s National University of Defence Technology and UCLSat for University College London”, it said.
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The NASA site named the satellite name as CN06.
The relevant quote apparently comes from William's article.

Offline input~2

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Offline eeergo

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Quote from: @lkjohnsn
In honor of Lemur-2-Lisasaurus making it to orbit, here's a pic of me carrying a Lemur in the approved manner to maximise the love it feels
https://twitter.com/lkjohnsn/status/878116117222260736

 ;D
« Last Edit: 06/28/2017 06:01 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline Thomas Dorman

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India CubeSat InflateSail, Object F SPC# 42770. Launched on June 23, 2017. The Sail was deployed yesterday from what we understand. This pass was imaged on July 12, 2017 @ 3:39:33 UT as it was passing through Bootes above the bright star Arcturus at a distance of 575.3 Kms @ a magnitude of around +4.2 with a phase angle of 83 degrees. This is nearing the limit for our Sony DSC w-5. We could just pick the satellite up naked eye as it approached Bootes then it brightened up real quick! We inverted the image to make the track easier to see. Exposure was 30 seconds,ISO 400. Enjoy! Regards Thomas

Offline sanman

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A more hi-def clip of the Cartosat-2E separation


Offline sanman

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Offline Liss

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The word is one of the six Sprite femtosats hosted on Venta and Max Valier has separated and phoned home:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2141956-smallest-satellite-ever-paves-way-for-planned-interstellar-fleet/

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Breakthrough Starshot has taken the first step towards their grand plans to one day send spacecraft to Alpha Centauri. On June 23, the $100 million initiative to send light-propelled spacecraft to our nearest star sent the tiniest-ever satellites into orbit.

An Indian rocket carried six of these miniature satellites, called Sprites, into space. Two of them are attached to the sides of other, larger satellites: the Latvian Venta satellite and the Italian Max Valier satellite. Once communications are established, the Max Valier satellite will release the other four Sprites to orbit on their own.

Each Sprite is a four-gram square of circuit board measuring 3.5 centimetres to a side. Despite their small size, the Sprites carry a lot of instruments. Each one has a computer processor, solar panels, a magnetometer, a gyroscope, and a radio for communicating with researchers on Earth.                             

So far, researchers have only gotten a signal from one of the two Sprites hitching a ride on the larger satellites. The rest have not been released yet because the Max Valier satellite has not made contact with its mission controllers, possibly due to problems with its radio antenna. Without a functioning radio antenna, the satellite will be unable to receive any command to release its cargo.

Zac Manchester, the Harvard researcher leading the project, views even that one signal as a triumph. “We were really just trying to get them up there and communicate with them,” he says. “It’s the first time that a spacecraft on this size scale has worked.”


https://phys.org/news/2017-08-messages-world-smallest-space-probe.html

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The world's smallest space probe, conceived at Menlo Park's visionary Breakthrough Starshot, has phoned home.
                           
The flying computer chip dubbed "Sprite," the size of a Saltine cracker, is healthy, happy and sending us signals from Earth's orbit, 400 miles from home.

It's still a long way from where its progeny may someday travel: our neighboring star system Alpha Centauri, 24 trillion miles away. The dream is for Sprite-like spacecraft to take close-up images and collect data - maybe even detect gases produced by alien life.

The little Sprite could someday help answer the big questions of life in the Universe: Are we alone? Are there habitable worlds out there? If so, can we reach them?

"But it's very good first step. It's proof of concept," said Breakthrough Starshot director Pete Worden, former director of NASA Ames Research Center, from his office on the valley's storied Sand Hill Road. "It's very exciting."

Sprite is the brainchild of Zac Manchester, whose Kickstarter "KickSat" campaign at Cornell University raised the first funds to develop the concept. This month, he joins the faculty of Stanford's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His arrival at Stanford is expected to accelerate the chip satellite effort.

Sprite weighs just four grams, lighter than a quarter. It has its own solar panel, communication capabilities and sensors.

Such tiny spacecraft are possible thanks to rapid advances made in the semiconductor industry, according to Manchester. Most of the features of a traditional spacecraft can be integrated onto a chip-scale device. Sprite is built using the same devices and processes used in the consumer electronics industry.

Sprite has siblings - several Sprites were launched on June 23 - but they've gone incommunicado. They don't fly on their own; they're piggybacking on two satellites.

The one researchers hear is broadcasting a standard radio signal, charging its batteries with sunlight. News came of its signal late last month, via a Cornell ground station. (Amateurs can also listen in; Manchester's KickSat offered a design and instructions for a low-cost and portable Sprite receiving station. Consisting of a hand-held antenna, low-noise amplifier, low-cost USB radio receiver dongle, it can be built for about $200, plus a PC to run the software.)




This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

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