Author Topic: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)  (Read 4446 times)

Offline Sam Ho

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There was a wave of FCC filings November 15.

Audacy: 3 MEO relays to communicate with LEO spacecraft.
SATLOA2016111500117

Karousel: 12 IGSO satelllites for video
SATLOA2016111500113

Kepler MULTUS: 2-140 LEO nanosats for M2M communication
SATLOI2016111500114

LeoSat: 78 LEO satellites
SATLOI2016111500112

O3b: Amendment to add another 40 satellites
SATAMD2016111500116

SpaceX: has its own thread
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41634.0
SATLOA2016111500118

Space Norway: 2 satellites in high-inclination 16-hour orbit
SATLOI2016111500111

Telesat Canada: 117 in LEO
SATLOI2016111500108

Boeing: 60 IGSO (this is separate from the smallsat filing they also have)
SATLOA2016111500109

Theia: 112 for remote sensing
SATLOA2016111500121

Viasat: 24 in polar MEO
SATLOI2016111500120
« Last Edit: 03/03/2017 02:28 AM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Re: November 2016 FCC NGSO filings
« Reply #1 on: 11/17/2016 10:57 PM »
Found the FCC deadline, it was in a filing about the OneWeb application:
Quote
Additional applications. We invite additional applications and petitions for declaratory ruling for
NGSO-like satellite operation in the 10.7-12.7 GHz, 14.0-14.5 GHz, 17.8-18.6 GHz, 18.8-19.3 GHz,
27.5-28.35 GHz, 28.35-29.1 GHz, and 29.5-30.0 GHz frequency bands. Applications and petitions filed
by November 15, 2016, will be considered together with the OneWeb Petition. Requests filed after this
date may not be entitled to shared use of this spectrum
with respect to any grant of applications or
petitions filed prior to the cut-off date. Applicants and petitioners that file by the cut-off date will be
afforded an opportunity to amend their requests, if necessary, to conform to any requirements or policies
that may be subsequently adopted concerning NGSO-like satellite operation in these bands.

The document is attached.
« Last Edit: 11/17/2016 11:00 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #2 on: 03/03/2017 02:35 AM »
And now some more filings, this time in V-band instead of Ku/Ka.

Space News: FCC gets five new applications for non-geostationary satellite constellations
Quote
Boeing’s plan to deploy a constellation of V-band satellites in non-geostationary orbit has prompted at least five companies, including SpaceX and OneWeb, to file me-too proposals with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.

The FCC had given companies until March 1 to disclose whether they also had plans to use the same V-band that Boeing had applied for in November of last year.

FCC Applications:
O3B Amendment
Theia Amendment
Boeing Amendment
SpaceX Application
Boeing Application
Telesat Canada Application
OneWeb Application

edit: If this ever actually happened it would increase the SpaceX constellations to 12,000 satellites.  Maybe Elon's plan to solve global warming involves blocking some sunlight from reaching the planet.
« Last Edit: 03/03/2017 02:41 AM by gongora »

Offline Danderman

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #3 on: 03/04/2017 03:23 AM »
Anyone interested in the last time this was happening can read this old site:

http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/L.Wood/constellations/overview.html

Let us hope that we are not doomed to repeat history, again.

Offline jongoff

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #4 on: 03/04/2017 03:42 AM »
Anyone interested in the last time this was happening can read this old site:

http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/L.Wood/constellations/overview.html

Let us hope that we are not doomed to repeat history, again.

I was thinking that things were starting to feel late 90s-ish too. There are some real differences--more traction and progress (and deeper backing) for SpaceX, Blue Origin, and more successful commercial satellite efforts. But also a lot more hype, and lots of money flowing around.

My curiosity question is when the bubble pops, what fraction of these companies will have a) already raised enough money to make it to market, and b) be able to make it to stable cashflow positive operations even during an economic downturn, and c) how many spacecraft will actually end up getting launched?

Here's to hoping that the number of surviving new constellations is greater than zero, and hopefully in the 2-3 range. Though I'll really be impressed if by 2025 we have more than 3000 spacecraft orbiting earth.

~Jon

Offline HMXHMX

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #5 on: 03/04/2017 03:55 AM »
Anyone interested in the last time this was happening can read this old site:

http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/L.Wood/constellations/overview.html

Let us hope that we are not doomed to repeat history, again.

I was thinking that things were starting to feel late 90s-ish too. There are some real differences--more traction and progress (and deeper backing) for SpaceX, Blue Origin, and more successful commercial satellite efforts. But also a lot more hype, and lots of money flowing around.

My curiosity question is when the bubble pops, what fraction of these companies will have a) already raised enough money to make it to market, and b) be able to make it to stable cashflow positive operations even during an economic downturn, and c) how many spacecraft will actually end up getting launched?

Here's to hoping that the number of surviving new constellations is greater than zero, and hopefully in the 2-3 range. Though I'll really be impressed if by 2025 we have more than 3000 spacecraft orbiting earth.

~Jon

I could say "been there, done that, got the T-shirt" since I'm sitting here typing while wearing a Teledesic T-shirt!  ;)

Offline Danderman

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #6 on: 03/07/2017 12:04 AM »
"There was a revolution in spaceflight in the 1990s, and all I got was this crappy T-shirt".

Now for a story from the past: a space entrepreneur who shall remain un-named was really upset about ELV back in the day (this was the USAF program for Atlas V/Delta IV) since he claimed that ELV could orbit an entire constellation in one launch. I always wondered why that never happened, why some LEO satellite venture didn't put dozens and dozens of small satellites on one Atlas-V 551 (well, Globalstar kind of tried that with Zenit with 12 sats on one launch).

Anyway, the reason was and is that LEO comsats fly in Walker constellations in planes and you really can't launch to more than one plane at a time, so if your constellation has 12 planes, that is going to end up as 12 launches, all things considered, and besides, you need to be able launch ones and twos as replacements/upgrades. So, the small launchers planned for the 1990s would have been handy had all of those LEO constellations been funded.

Offline gongora

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #7 on: 03/17/2017 12:47 AM »
Space Intel Report - ITU, FCC: Satellite constellation surge requires new rules
Quote
Albuquerque said FCC approval of the OneWeb constellation “could be granted fairly soon,” but that OneWeb has no special advantage over the 11 other filings that came after it.

He said the FCC expected to send to the 11 more-recent filings under the OneWeb procedure a request for supplementary information on their proposals in a matter of days, just as it did with OneWeb.

“All the applications in the processing round — OneWeb plus the 11 others — have equal status,” Albuquerque said. “The fact that OneWeb was first doesn’t give it any priority. But most likely action on OneWeb will happen before the others.”

Offline gongora

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #8 on: 05/11/2017 04:56 PM »
Telesat and Leosat are a couple of the more-likely-to-be-built LEO constellations from among the many filings.

[Space Intel Report] Telesat: LEO gives more user bandwidth than GEO HTS
Still planning to launch prototypes this year.  Planning sats in both polar (99.5 degrees) and less inclined (37.4 degrees) inclinations.  Registered in Canada.

[Space Intel Report] Sky Perfect JSat invests in LeoSat B2B broadband constellation
Using an updated/bigger version of the bus that Iridium uses, with optical satellite interconnects.  Focusing on point-to-point business/government users.  Plans prototypes in 2019.

Offline gongora

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #9 on: 05/31/2017 03:47 PM »
Public Notice from the FCC on the Ku/Ka band processing round.  It lists all of the constellation filings accepted so far with their number of satellites, orbits, frequencies, and where they will be licensed.  A round of public comments and replies starts on June 26.

They also established a cutoff for additional Ku/Ka band NGSO applications to be filed by July 26.

The V-band filings are being handled separately from the Ku/Ka band filings, so there should be another of these documents eventually for the rest of the constellation filings.

Offline gongora

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Re: FCC NGSO Constellation filings (Nov 2016/Mar 2017)
« Reply #10 on: 09/08/2017 04:42 PM »
At the FCC's September Open Commission Meeting one of the items on the agenda is updated rules for the NGSO constellations.  Getting these rules updated would be a significant step towards dealing with the rest of the constellation filings.

Quote
FCC ANNOUNCES TENTATIVE AGENDA FOR THE SEPTEMBER OPEN COMMISSION MEETING
--
WASHINGTON, September 7, 2017 – Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai announced that the following items are tentatively on the agenda for the September Open Commission Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, September 26, 2017:
...
Updating Rules for Non-Geostationary Satellites in the Fixed-Satellite Service – The Commission will consider a Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that recommends updating and streamlining the Commission’s rules to facilitate the licensing of the next generation of non-geostationary, fixed-satellite service systems. (IB Docket No. 16-408)

Attached is a pdf document about the updated rules for the NGSO constellations. 

For deployment milestones, the new rules require 50% deployment within 6 years and 100% deployment within 9 years, which is a  bit more than SpaceX wanted but better than the old rules requiring 100% deployment in 6 years.  Anyone not meeting those milestones would have their permissions reduced to the number of satellites they actually have on orbit.

They have not yet decided on whether to change the domestic coverage requirements.  That is the "Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking" part of the document.  With the relaxed deployment milestones I'm not sure how much SpaceX really needs their requested waiver of coverage for Alaska in the initial deployment.

Article about the proposed changes:
   [Space Intel Report] U.S. regulators propose to relax satellite constellation in-service, coverage rules

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