Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon Heavy Demo - Discussion and Speculation  (Read 135877 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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I had a look through the past threads but I couldn't find one for the first Falcon Heavy launch! This will be a demonstration mission. The STP-2 mission will fly on the second Falcon Heavy. As reported in the AMOS-6 discussion thread, launch is currently planned around May 2017.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41252.msg1598513#msg1598513

"Pad 40 will probably be back in action around March or April next year. Probably around May or so is when we will launch Falcon Heavy."
« Last Edit: 03/23/2017 11:08 PM by gongora »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Flying Beaver

F A L C O N  H E A V Y  side core with Nose Cone spotted leaving Hawthorne tonight!!!!!!!!!!!!

You can see the lack of interstage cuz the mount for the front set of wheels is too far forwards.

THIS IS CRAZY!!!  ;D ;D

https://www.instagram.com/p/BQM5Po2Dvz4/
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 06:38 AM by Flying Beaver »
Saw OG-2 Booster Land in person 21/12/2015.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Enhanced image.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline cartman

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Attached video for people that do not have instagram

Offline AncientU

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Astounding that we are a few months out and no confirmed payload. (Plenty of rumors and wishes, but nothing solid AFAIK.)  Don't want to start another first payload thread;  any real info would be great!
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
-- SpaceX friend of mlindner

Offline woods170

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Astounding that we are a few months out and no confirmed payload. (Plenty of rumors and wishes, but nothing solid AFAIK.)  Don't want to start another first payload thread;  any real info would be great!
It's a demo mission. No customer payloads on it of any importance. A lesson learned from the likes of Ariane 5 G, Ariane 5 ECA, Falcon 1, Delta IV Heavy, etc.
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 11:20 AM by woods170 »

Offline Kaputnik

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Astounding that we are a few months out and no confirmed payload. (Plenty of rumors and wishes, but nothing solid AFAIK.)  Don't want to start another first payload thread;  any real info would be great!
It's a demo mission. No customer payloads on it of any importance. A lesson learned from the likes of Ariane 5 G, Ariane 5 ECA, Falcon 1, Delta IV Heavy, etc.

Is that confirmed, or speculation?
SpaceX have a history of putting payloads on maiden launches.
Waiting for joy and raptor

Offline Orbiter

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Astounding that we are a few months out and no confirmed payload. (Plenty of rumors and wishes, but nothing solid AFAIK.)  Don't want to start another first payload thread;  any real info would be great!
It's a demo mission. No customer payloads on it of any importance. A lesson learned from the likes of Ariane 5 G, Ariane 5 ECA, Falcon 1, Delta IV Heavy, etc.

Is that confirmed, or speculation?
SpaceX have a history of putting payloads on maiden launches.

F9 F-1 launched a Dragon boilerplate.
Attended space missions: STS-114, STS-124, STS-128, STS-135, Atlas V "Curiosity", Delta IV Heavy NROL-15, Atlas V MUOS-2, Delta IV Heavy NROL-37, SpaceX CRS-9, SpaceX JCSAT-16, Atlas V GOES-R.

Online Robotbeat

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"of any great importance" is an operative phrase, there.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline wardy89

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Seeing the pictures of a potential falcon heavy side core with nose cone already attached has me thinking.

To lift stages on and off the test stands as well as recover the stages once landed SpaceX have been using a fitting that secures to the interstage of the rocket. This will not be possible with a falcon heavy core with a nose cone attached. I would assume SpaceX wouldn't want to be messing round with removing a nose cone while the rocket sits on a landing pad. It would be logical to design the nose cone so that it has the structural capability and includes fixtures so that it can be uses as the lifting point.

Does anyone have any insight into wether this might be the case?

Offline vanoord

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #10 on: 02/07/2017 12:59 PM »
Seeing the pictures of a potential falcon heavy side core with nose cone already attached has me thinking.

To lift stages on and off the test stands as well as recover the stages once landed SpaceX have been using a fitting that secures to the interstage of the rocket. This will not be possible with a falcon heavy core with a nose cone attached. I would assume SpaceX wouldn't want to be messing round with removing a nose cone while the rocket sits on a landing pad. It would be logical to design the nose cone so that it has the structural capability and includes fixtures so that it can be uses as the lifting point.

Does anyone have any insight into wether this might be the case?

Some form of external mounting points arranged round the diameter of the core just under the cone?

Could be similar to the four lugs that are on the outside of the octaweb for attaching the jacks when they recover them on the ASDS.

Offline old_sellsword

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #11 on: 02/07/2017 01:03 PM »
Seeing the pictures of a potential falcon heavy side core with nose cone already attached has me thinking.

To lift stages on and off the test stands as well as recover the stages once landed SpaceX have been using a fitting that secures to the interstage of the rocket. This will not be possible with a falcon heavy core with a nose cone attached. I would assume SpaceX wouldn't want to be messing round with removing a nose cone while the rocket sits on a landing pad. It would be logical to design the nose cone so that it has the structural capability and includes fixtures so that it can be uses as the lifting point.

Does anyone have any insight into wether this might be the case?

My guess is that they'll use the nose cone hardpoints for the center booster attachment struts. Or possibly even the grid fin attachment points.
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 01:04 PM by old_sellsword »

Offline wannamoonbase

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #12 on: 02/07/2017 02:50 PM »
Seeing the pictures of a potential falcon heavy side core with nose cone already attached has me thinking.

To lift stages on and off the test stands as well as recover the stages once landed SpaceX have been using a fitting that secures to the interstage of the rocket. This will not be possible with a falcon heavy core with a nose cone attached. I would assume SpaceX wouldn't want to be messing round with removing a nose cone while the rocket sits on a landing pad. It would be logical to design the nose cone so that it has the structural capability and includes fixtures so that it can be uses as the lifting point.

Does anyone have any insight into wether this might be the case?

Some form of external mounting points arranged round the diameter of the core just under the cone?

Could be similar to the four lugs that are on the outside of the octaweb for attaching the jacks when they recover them on the ASDS.

Agreed, the boosters are big but not that heavy. 

Edit: Very exciting to see real FH hardware on the road. 
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 02:51 PM by wannamoonbase »
Excited to be finally into the first Falcon Heavy flow, we are getting so close!

Offline Elvis in Space

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #13 on: 02/07/2017 03:27 PM »
Astounding that we are a few months out and no confirmed payload. (Plenty of rumors and wishes, but nothing solid AFAIK.)  Don't want to start another first payload thread;  any real info would be great!
It's a demo mission. No customer payloads on it of any importance. A lesson learned from the likes of Ariane 5 G, Ariane 5 ECA, Falcon 1, Delta IV Heavy, etc.

Is that confirmed, or speculation?
SpaceX have a history of putting payloads on maiden launches.

They're going to send a Dragon to Mars in 2018 and there's a closet full of used Dragon V1 available. I know it's different but same and if you got nothing else...?
Cheeseburgers on Mars!

Offline mr. mark

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #14 on: 02/07/2017 03:41 PM »
Sources close to me say confirmed. FH side booster.

Offline Proponent

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #15 on: 02/07/2017 03:46 PM »
F9 F-1 launched a Dragon boilerplate.

And don't forget the cheese.

Offline old_sellsword

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #16 on: 02/07/2017 03:47 PM »
Sources close to me say confirmed. FH side booster.

Did they happen to mention if it was the landed booster they converted or a new one?

Offline Elvis in Space

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #17 on: 02/07/2017 03:51 PM »
Sources close to me say confirmed. FH side booster.

There has to be another, right? Will they get done with this one at McGregor before they ship the next or is another close behind?
Cheeseburgers on Mars!

Offline ugordan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #18 on: 02/07/2017 03:57 PM »
F9 F-1 launched a Dragon boilerplate.

And don't forget the cheese.

Cheese was flown on F9-02.

Offline mr. mark

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Demo Mission - May 2017 - Discussion
« Reply #19 on: 02/07/2017 03:59 PM »
Speculation suggests its the returned booster. Thaicom - 8.
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 04:03 PM by mr. mark »

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