Author Topic: LIVE: Delta IV-M+(5,4) - WGS-8 - December 7, 2016 (23:53 UTC)  (Read 29221 times)

The USAF launch patch for WGS 8 shows circling sharks for “The Sharks” nickname of the 45th Space Wing. The sharks are swimming circles around insignias for key mission participants. The Sharks insignia derives from the teeth earlier painted on the nose of all 14th Air Force aircraft and later launch vehicle. (USAF image)

The orbit data is extracted from the following two-line orbital elements,

1 41879U 16075A   16358.21353247 0.00000000  00000-0  00000-0 0    01
2 41879   3.6003  66.5855 0199996 312.3102   7.7135  1.00270000    06
Epoch (UTC):   23 December 2016 05:07:29
Eccentricity:   0.0199996
inclination:   3.6003°
perigee height:   34943 km
apogee height:   36630 km
right ascension of ascending node:   66.5855°
argument of perigee:   312.3102°
revolutions per day:   1.00270000
mean anomaly at epoch:   7.7135°
orbit number at epoch:   0

Offline WHAP

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T+32 minutes, 34 seconds. SECO-2 confirmed.

The RL-10B-2 engine has officially shut down, ending tonight's powered flight. Separation of WGS-8 will occur 9 minutes and 10 seconds after SECO-2.


Ok Zach how many RL-10's are left in the stockpile ?


It's today's question  :)

I have no clue. Sorry.  ???

Nine more B-2's to fly.
ULA employee.  My opinions do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.

Offline russianhalo117

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T+32 minutes, 34 seconds. SECO-2 confirmed.

The RL-10B-2 engine has officially shut down, ending tonight's powered flight. Separation of WGS-8 will occur 9 minutes and 10 seconds after SECO-2.


Ok Zach how many RL-10's are left in the stockpile ?


It's today's question  :)

I have no clue. Sorry.  ???

Nine more B-2's to fly.
So RL-10C-2's from then on if D-IVH flies longer than currently planned. Correct???

Online ZachS09

T+32 minutes, 34 seconds. SECO-2 confirmed.

The RL-10B-2 engine has officially shut down, ending tonight's powered flight. Separation of WGS-8 will occur 9 minutes and 10 seconds after SECO-2.


Ok Zach how many RL-10's are left in the stockpile ?


It's today's question  :)

I have no clue. Sorry.  ???

Nine more B-2's to fly.

How do you know there are nine RL-10B-2 engines left? Is there a source for this?
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline russianhalo117

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T+32 minutes, 34 seconds. SECO-2 confirmed.
The RL-10B-2 engine has officially shut down, ending tonight's powered flight. Separation of WGS-8 will occur 9 minutes and 10 seconds after SECO-2.
Ok Zach how many RL-10's are left in the stockpile ?
It's today's question  :)
I have no clue. Sorry.  ???
Nine more B-2's to fly.
How do you know there are nine RL-10B-2 engines left? Is there a source for this?
Barring a detection error, there are 11 DIV family launches left to fly. I know that a large bunch of RL-10B-2's were handed over for conversions to RL-10C-1's and the plan was convert a few RL-10C-1's to RL-10C-2's for baseline testing ahead of dev and qual testing of the new RL-10C-3 engine config for NASA's SLS EUS.

Offline Chris Bergin

Presser:

SSC Space US Supports Boeing’s Launch and Early Orbit Checkout of WGS-8

 

Horsham, PA, (12 April, 2017) – On 3 April 2017, SSC Space US, the U.S. subsidiary of SSC, successfully concluded its support of Boeing’s launch and early orbit checkout of the eighth Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS-8) satellite.   

 

Boeing leveraged SSC’s multi-band satellite ground network services to support its WGS-8 orbit raising and system checkout process prior to transferring command and control to the 3rd Space Operations Squadron, at Schriever AFB.

 

During the three month launch and early orbit checkout period, SSC ground stations in Hawaii, Alaska, Chile and Western Australia used Satellite Ground Link System (SGLS) and Unified S-Band (USB) frequency bands to meet all launch and satellite checkout communications requirements.

 

“SSC Space US has supported launch and early orbit checkout operations for all eight WGS satellites and the Boeing/SSC partnership will continue in the future with the WGS-9 and WGS-10 missions.  SSC is proud to be in a long-term relationship with Boeing on this important mission providing safe and secure critical communications,” said Erik Eliasen, Vice President of National Security Space Programs for SSC Space US.

 

About the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC)
As a global provider of advanced space services, SSC enables governmental agencies, companies and other commercial or research institutes to help Earth benefit from space. Built on decades of experience, SSC offers proven expertise in satellite management and engineering services, space technology and launch services for sounding rockets and balloons. SSC offers a complete portfolio of ground segment services to support space missions. Through SSC’s worldwide network of multi-mission satellite stations, SSC can provide unequalled Earth coverage for a large variety of missions in most orbits. www.sscspace.com

Offline Lars-J

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Quote
Orbital ATK ‏@OrbitalATK 9m9 minutes ago

Orbital ATK team at the launch pad yesterday preparing for today’s #DeltaIV launch of #WGS8. @ulalaunch

https://twitter.com/OrbitalATK/status/806474511587622912

I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
« Last Edit: 08/11/2017 11:53 PM by Lars-J »

Offline Jim

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One is fixed and the other gimbals

Offline russianhalo117

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Quote
Orbital ATK ‏@OrbitalATK 9m9 minutes ago

Orbital ATK team at the launch pad yesterday preparing for today’s #DeltaIV launch of #WGS8. @ulalaunch

https://twitter.com/OrbitalATK/status/806474511587622912

I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
two are are fixed nozzle and two vectorable nozzle

Sources: 2016 OA Motor Catalog (Section D45 or Page 57 of 163) and Gunter's Space Page (http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_eng/gem-60.htm)

Offline Lars-J

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One is fixed and the other gimbals

Thanks!  :)

Online LouScheffer

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I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
two are are fixed nozzle and two vectorable nozzle

Sources: 2016 OA Motor Catalog (Section D45 or Page 57 of 163) and Gunter's Space Page (http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_eng/gem-60.htm)
They must REALLY need the vectoring.  Compared to the fixed thrust model, the vectoring one is 1000 lbs (450 kg) heavier, slightly less ISP, and surely more expensive and less reliable.  Atlas, I believe, does not need vectoring on its solids.  So why does Delta IV?

Offline Newton_V

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I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
two are are fixed nozzle and two vectorable nozzle

Sources: 2016 OA Motor Catalog (Section D45 or Page 57 of 163) and Gunter's Space Page (http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_eng/gem-60.htm)
They must REALLY need the vectoring.  Compared to the fixed thrust model, the vectoring one is 1000 lbs (450 kg) heavier, slightly less ISP, and surely more expensive and less reliable.  Atlas, I believe, does not need vectoring on its solids.  So why does Delta IV?
For roll control.  RD-180 has 2 nozzles.

Online LouScheffer

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I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
two are are fixed nozzle and two vectorable nozzle

Sources: 2016 OA Motor Catalog (Section D45 or Page 57 of 163) and Gunter's Space Page (http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_eng/gem-60.htm)
They must REALLY need the vectoring.  Compared to the fixed thrust model, the vectoring one is 1000 lbs (450 kg) heavier, slightly less ISP, and surely more expensive and less reliable.  Atlas, I believe, does not need vectoring on its solids.  So why does Delta IV?
For roll control.  RD-180 has 2 nozzles.
But Delta-IV can launch without solids, so it has built-in roll control (turbo-pump exhaust).  I'd then guess this does not have enough control authority to cover the torque potentially induced by thrust imbalances in non-vectoring solids.

Offline russianhalo117

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I ran across the image in the post I am quoting, and I have a question about the Delta IV M+ SRBs... Why is one nozzle more protected than the other? (see red arrows in image) They both seem identical otherwise, and aren't they separated at the same time? Thanks... 
two are are fixed nozzle and two vectorable nozzle

Sources: 2016 OA Motor Catalog (Section D45 or Page 57 of 163) and Gunter's Space Page (http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_eng/gem-60.htm)
They must REALLY need the vectoring.  Compared to the fixed thrust model, the vectoring one is 1000 lbs (450 kg) heavier, slightly less ISP, and surely more expensive and less reliable.  Atlas, I believe, does not need vectoring on its solids.  So why does Delta IV?
For roll control.  RD-180 has 2 nozzles.
But Delta-IV can launch without solids, so it has built-in roll control (turbo-pump exhaust).  I'd then guess this does not have enough control authority to cover the torque potentially induced by thrust imbalances in non-vectoring solids.
AFAIK RS-68 gimbal is inhibited until just before SRM tail off.

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