Author Topic: Expedition 53 Thread  (Read 20971 times)

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Expedition 53 Thread
« on: 05/03/2016 10:35 PM »
ISS Expedition 53 mission patch

Entertaining design for 53, with simplified representations of Sputnik and the ISS in orbit about the Earth, which itself is inside a 'house' of stars.

« Last Edit: 05/04/2016 12:27 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #1 on: 08/30/2016 03:20 PM »
Quote
Astro2fish
Had some great Emergency training yesterday with my crew & the team - even had matching shirts!
« Last Edit: 08/30/2016 03:23 PM by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #2 on: 11/05/2016 06:27 PM »
New patch.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #3 on: 01/19/2017 07:36 AM »
January 18, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-007

NASA Hosts News Conference, Interviews with Next Space Station Crew
 
 
NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik, Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in late spring, will participate in a news conference at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, Jan. 25, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The news conference will air live on NASA Television and stream on the agency’s website.

This will be Bresnik’s second trip to the space station, the second expedition for Ryazanskiy, and Nespoli’s third trip to the space station. They will be part of Expeditions 52 and 53.

Media who wish to participate by telephone should call Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 no later than 1:45 p.m. Those following the briefing on social media can ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.

After the news conference, interview opportunities are available with all crew members, in person or by phone. To request credentials to attend in person, or to reserve an interview opportunity, media must contact Johnson's newsroom by 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23. The deadline for international media accreditation has passed.

During his upcoming mission aboard the orbiting laboratory, Bresnik and his crewmates will facilitate more than 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth. Among the experiments is Cardiac Stem Cells which investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity, including physical and molecular changes. The Cosmic-Ray Energetics and Mass experiment is scheduled to arrive at the station during the crew’s stay and will measure the charges of cosmic rays ranging from hydrogen up through iron nuclei, over a broad energy range.

Experiments such as these yield benefits for all of humanity, and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including the agency’s Journey to Mars.

Originally from Santa Monica, California, Bresnik graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, and was commissioned in the Marine Corps in May 1989. He was selected as an astronaut by NASA in May 2004 and flew aboard the space shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station in 2009.

Follow Bresnik on social media:

https://twitter.com/astrokomrade

https://www.facebook.com/AstroKomrade/

https://www.instagram.com/astrokomrade/

Check out the full NASA TV schedule, video streaming and satellite information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Find more information about the International Space Station and its crews at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #4 on: 01/27/2017 06:25 PM »
NASA Hosts News Conference, Interviews with Next Space Station Crew.



Quote
NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik, Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in late spring, participated in a news conference Jan. 25, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

This will be Bresnik’s second trip to the space station, the second expedition for Ryazanskiy, and Nespoli’s third trip to the space station. They will be part of Expeditions 52 and 53.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #5 on: 03/13/2017 07:44 PM »
http://tass.com/science/935282

Quote
MOSCOW, March 13. /TASS/. U.S. astronaut Joseph M. Acaba will fly to the International Space Stations (ISS) as a third crew member of the Soyuz MS-06 spaceship. His flight will be financed by Russia’s Rocket and Space Corporation Energia as debt repayment to US’ Boeing under the joint project Sea Launch, a source in the Russian space industry told TASS on Monday.

"Joseph Acaba has been appointed as a member of the main crew of the Soyuz MS-06 spaceship due to be launched to the International Space Station on September 13. Shannon Walker has been appointed as a member of backup crew. Most likely, she will be subsequently chosen as a main crew member of the Soyuz MS-08 spacecraft due to fly to the ISS in March 2018," the source said.

A spokesman for the cosmonaut training center told TASS on Monday the two U.S. astronauts are to begin pre-flight training but did not specify which crews they have been appointed to. According to earlier reports, under an amicable agreement reached by Energia and Boeing as part of debt repayment under the Sea Launch project, the Russian corporation will give the American side five seats aboard Soyuz spacecraft, in particular one seat in 2017, one seat in 2018, and an option on three seats in 2019. Energia’s debt to Boeing was 330 million US dollars, as was ruled by a California court in 2015. In the summer of 2015, the sides reached an amicable agreement where Energia undertook to repay its debt by means of works and new projects.

Acaba and Walker were named NASA astronaut candidates in May 2004. Both have already made a spaceflight aboard a Russian Soyuz spaceship.


Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #6 on: 03/16/2017 03:49 PM »
ISS Expedition 53 mission patch

Entertaining design for 53, with simplified representations of Sputnik and the ISS in orbit about the Earth, which itself is inside a 'house' of stars.

This is now the 52 patch, and the old 52 patch is now the 54 patch.

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #7 on: 03/18/2017 01:06 AM »
This is now the 52 patch, and the old 52 patch is now the 54 patch.
yes, that change happened well after my post, and has been known for awhile now.

Here's the latest update to 53:

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #8 on: 03/25/2017 05:22 PM »
This is the first conformation by NASA, which I´ve read, that Joseph Acaba will be member of Expedition 53/54.
https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/joseph-m-acaba/biography
Quote
He is currently training to be a Flight Engineer for Expedition 53/54.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #9 on: 05/06/2017 01:13 PM »
May 04, 2017

NASA News Conference, Media Availability with Next Space Station Crew


NASA astronauts Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei and their Russian crewmate Alexander Misurkin, who are part of an upcoming International Space Station crew, will conduct a news conference and be available for media interviews Wednesday, May 10, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The news conference will be broadcast on NASA Television and streamed on the agency website.

Acaba, a veteran astronaut, and Vande Hei, a first-time space flyer, as well as veteran cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will launch to the space station aboard the Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft Sept. 13, 2017, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. They will join the space station’s Expedition 53 and 54 crews, and return to Earth in March 2018.

The news conference will air live on NASA Television at 2 p.m. EDT Wednesday, May 10. Reporters who wish to participate by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 no later than 1:45 p.m. Those following the briefing on social media can ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.

After the news conference, interview opportunities are available in person or by phone. To request credentials to attend in person or to reserve an interview opportunity, U.S. reporters must contact Johnson's newsroom by 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 9.

During their planned five-month mission, the station crew members will take part in approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including Mars.

This will be Acaba’s third trip to the space station and his second long-duration mission. He was selected as an astronaut in 2004, and flew aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-119 mission to deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and a truss element to the space station in 2009. He returned to the station for a longer stay in 2012, as part of the station’s Expedition 31 and 32 crews. He has logged a total of 138 days in space during two missions.

Born in Inglewood, California, Acaba grew up in Anaheim, California, He earned a bachelor's degree in geology at University of California in Santa Barbara, one master’s degree in geology from the University of Arizona, and one in education, curriculum and instruction from Texas Tech University. Before coming to NASA, he spent time in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves and the Peace Corps, worked as a hydrogeologist and taught high school and middle school.

Vande Hei was selected in 2009 as a member of the 20th NASA astronaut class and completed astronaut training in 2011. Prior to becoming an astronaut, the Virginia native earned a bachelor‘s degree in physics from Saint John's University and a master of science in applied physics from Stanford University. He was commissioned in the U.S. Army through the ROTC program and served as a combat engineer. In 1999, he became an assistant professor of physics at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point. In 2006, Vande Hei served as a Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control, Houston, for Expeditions 15 through 20 and space shuttle missions STS-122, 123, 124, 126 and 127.

Find Acaba’s and Vande Hei’s full biographies at:

https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/astronauts/active

Follow Vande Hei on Twitter at:

@Astro_Sabot

Learn more about the International Space Station and its crews at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #10 on: 05/11/2017 06:31 PM »


Quote
Future Space Station Crew Previews Upcoming Mission
NASA astronauts Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei and Alexander Misurkin, of the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos will launch aboard a Soyuz spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Sept. 13 to the International Space Station, where they will join the station’s Expedition 53 and 54 crews. The trio participated in a news conference May 10 at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston to preview their upcoming mission.

During their planned five-month stay on the orbital laboratory, the crew members will take part in approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth, in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. The will return to Earth in March 2018.

Launch is scheduled on Sep 13, 2017 and landing on Feb 23, 2018 after 163 days in space...
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #11 on: 06/23/2017 11:27 AM »
Quote
Randy Bresnik @AstroKomrade
You know you are close to launch when they put out the poster.  Couldn’t ask to fly with a better crew. 6 Humans - 1 Mission @Space_Station

---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #12 on: 07/14/2017 03:14 PM »
Quote
Mark T. Vande Hei @Astro_Sabot
The Expedition 53 Gang of Six. We'll be together on #SpaceStation starting 9/13.  The gents on the group's left (photo's right) launch 7/28.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #13 on: 07/15/2017 12:41 PM »
Quote
Mark T. Vande Hei @Astro_Sabot
The Expedition 53 official photo including @AstroAcaba @astro_paolo & @AstroKomrade.  Tomorrow, most head to Baikonur for MS-05 launch.

---
SMS ;-).

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #14 on: 07/15/2017 01:44 PM »


Quote
ESA Euronews: The space veteran
Published on 14 Jul 2017

It's an age when many of us would be considering winding down, and cutting back on physical exertion. Not so for Paolo Nespoli, who is about to embark on his third space mission at the age of 60, which makes him Europe's oldest astronaut. At the end of July he will voyage to the International Space Station (ISS), where he will remain for some months.

This video is also available in the following languages:
French: ...
German: ...
Spanish: ...
Italian: ...
Portuguese: ...
Hungarian: ...
Greek: ...

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #15 on: 07/17/2017 06:33 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #16 on: 08/10/2017 06:57 AM »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #17 on: 08/27/2017 01:34 PM »
Quote
L-17- leaving Moscow for Baikonur. Feels strange doing this as a prime crew member.  Going to be a lot of firsts for me in the coming weeks!

https://twitter.com/astro_sabot/status/901702873184129025

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #18 on: 09/06/2017 04:13 PM »
Paolo at work in Columbus module....

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #19 on: 09/07/2017 07:35 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/05/2017

Posted on September 5, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

50 Soyuz (50S) Undock: 50S, with Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Fyodor Yurchikin onboard, undocked Saturday at 4:58 PM CDT and landed in Kazakhstan at 8:22 PM CDT. The ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 52S on September 13.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) Inspection:  On Friday, the crew inspected the ELF chamber and removed Foreign Object Debris (FOD) located in the ELF chamber. The FOD will be returned to the ground for additional analysis.  ELF activities will resume after SpX-12 unberthing.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) Operation Session:  Yesterday the crew was scheduled to exercise while using MED-2 body markers and multiple camcorders for ground evaluation. Because the loading strap was fully extended and could not be retracted, the crew completed only the ARED exercise portion of the experiment and ground teams are working on a forward plan to conduct the evaluation portion of the investigation. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Multi-Omics-Mouse: On Friday, the crew collected blood samples from the mice. Saturday the crew refilled the mice water supply. Today the crew exchanged the waste collecting equipment and odor filter of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit in glove box, and then transferred the Mouse Cage Units with mice from glove box to Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew performed their FMS sessions this morning. The FMS experiment is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the crew performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) Removal:  This morning the crew was scheduled to remove the SCA from MSL for return and analysis on the ground.  However, during yesterday’s Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) activation, the rack came up in an off-nominal configuration. Today’s scheduled activity to remove the SCA was aborted until the issue is better understood. 

Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) Circuit Card R&R Prep:  This morning the crew reviewed an overview and procedures associated with the MBSU I-level maintenance planned for later this week to replacing a Common Controller Assembly circuit card.  This afternoon the crew will have a conference with ground specialist to address any of the crew’s questions.

SpX-12 Dragon Cargo Operations:  As of yesterday cargo transfer specialist estimated the crew will require 23 hours to complete packing the Dragon vehicle for return.  The crew reported they performed approximately 2.5 hours of cargo operations off the task list today.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #20 on: 09/07/2017 09:21 AM »
September 06, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-098

South Carolina Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students at Laing Middle School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, which is near Charleston, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 10:20 a.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 8. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 52 Flight Engineer Col. Randy Bresnik is an alumnus of The Citadel, located in Charleston. He will answer questions from students at Laing Middle School. The school is hosting the event with the help of Citadel cadets and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. Cadets will lead the younger students as they pose questions to the Citadel astronaut alumnus.

Bresnik launched to the space station on July 28. He is expected to return to Earth in December. A Marine Corps veteran and member of The Citadel class of 1989, Bresnik is one of the college’s most visible principled leaders. In May of 2004, Bresnik was selected out of approximately 4,000 applicants to become one of the 11 members of NASA’s Astronaut Class 9, becoming the first graduate of The Citadel to have the opportunity to fly in space. Expedition 52/53 is Bresnik’s second mission to the space station, the first being in 2009. Bresnik is the commander of Expedition 53.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Kim Keelor at kkeelor@citadel.edu. Laing Middle School is at 2705 Bulrush Basket Lane in Mt. Pleasant.

The cadets will lead a two-part event for the eighth grade students, visiting the class first to teach them about Bresnik, the space station, how the live downlink works and conduct an in-class lesson related to the space station. On Sept. 8, they will lead the conversation with Bresnik, guiding the participating students as they ask questions that are expected to revolve around experiments which Bresnik is assisting, as well as space fitness. Middle school students across the South Carolina Lowcountry as well as cadets on The Citadel campus are expected to watch the event on NASA TV. A link to recording will be provided to other teachers wishing to show it in their classrooms.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #21 on: 09/08/2017 10:27 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/06/2017

Posted on September 6, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Venice Film Festival Public Affairs Office (PAO) Event:  Paolo Nespoli participated in a 20-minute ESA PAO event for the Venice Film Festival.  The documentary ‘Expedition’, which chronicles ESA Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli’s preparation for human space mission, will be presented at the Venice Film Festival on September 6th. This PAO event was a press conference where journalists were given an opportunity to ask Paolo questions. The Director and producer of ‘Expedition’, Alessandra Bonavina, moderated the event.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) Operations Session:  Today the crew continued to conduct the ARED portion of MED-2 operations that began earlier this week by using body markers and multiple floating camcorders to capture the crew performing dead lifts and rowing exercises. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Genes in Space: The crew set up hardware in the maintenance work area (MWA) before conducting the Genes in Space experiment by processing the samples in the miniPCR, and then transferring the data to the SSC for downlink. The Genes in Space investigation, is a winning student-designed experiment, to test whether the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to study DNA alterations aboard the ISS. Spaceflight causes many changes to the human body, including alterations in DNA and a weakened immune system. Understanding whether these two processes are linked is important for safeguarding crew health, but DNA technology that can track these changes is relatively untested in space.

Electromagnetic Levitation (EML) European Drawer Rack (EDR) Maintenance: The crew performed maintenance activities by completing fan filter cleanings, rack rotations, and a handrail installation within the EML. EML is a facility composed of 4 inserts installed into the EDR on-orbit representing a facility for Electromagnetic Levitation of samples. The experiment samples are installed in a dedicated Sample Chamber that is attached to EML and will be replaced by new Sample Chambers for new experiment batches.

Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) Unit 2 Incubator Removal: Crewmembers removed a CO2 incubator controller from the SABL Unit 2 and then inserted ice bricks into SABL Unit 3 for conditioning. The SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has a temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #22 on: 09/08/2017 01:14 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/07/2017

Posted on September 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

MBSU I-Level Maintenance:  In early August, ground teams successfully transferred a degraded Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) from External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP2) site 4 to the JEM Airlock. Today, the crew removed the MBSU from the JEM A/L and performed Intermediate Level (I-Level) maintenance on the unit.  This MBSU is one of two failed units externally stowed on orbit that will be brought inside to undergo maintenance and repair.

Lighting Effects: This morning a crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Camera Inspections: After completing routine inspections of the LMM Confocal Unit, LMM Confocal Camera, LMM Wide-field Camera, and the LMM Observation Camera for shattered materials, the crew reported that no damage was found to the equipment.  The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The LMM enables novel research of microscopic phenomena in microgravity, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images and videos across many levels of magnification. The way that matter is organized and moves on the microscopic level profoundly affects the macroscopic world and an understanding of such processes helps scientists and engineers build more efficient materials and machines both for both the earth and space environments.

MAGVECTOR: The crew configured the power supply and supporting equipment prior to initiating the 13th experiment run of the MAGVECTOR investigation, which ends Thursday of next week.  MAGVECTOR investigates how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Online Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #23 on: 09/10/2017 07:12 PM »
CAPCOM updated the US crew about solar flare activity being tracked by Houston.  There is no concern about radiation but the crew was advised of elevated locations in the orbit and areas of the station with more, and less, shielding.  On board sensors will alert the crew if necessary and CAPCOM will follow up with more details.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #24 on: 09/11/2017 02:29 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/08/2017

Posted on September 8, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lighting Effects: The crew completed a visual assessment test in the Crew Quarters (CQs) by setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the CQ off, and performing one Numerical Verification Test and one Color Discrimination Test. The crew will then photograph the completed tests, before transferring the photos for downlink. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  Today the crew performed routine maintenance operations by filling the transportation cage units with water and refilling the camera washer water of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF).  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  In support of the on-going RR-9 investigation, the crew restocked the Animal Habitat Units with new food bars and cleaned the lid and interior cages. RR-9 studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joints, eyes and the immune system.

MELFI (Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS) Electronic Unit Removal: While removing the failed spare Electronic Unit from MELFI-1, which will be 1 of 2 units returned on SpX-12.; the crew found corrosion on the fluid line connector. This activity has been paused until the ground teams can determine a forward plan of action. The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures until those samples can be returned to the ground for analysis.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed weekly questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation today.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #25 on: 09/11/2017 07:05 PM »
Yesterday, crew was told to shield in some well-protected place in the ISS because of the solar flare.

https://ria.ru/space/20170911/1502225088.html
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #26 on: 09/11/2017 10:43 PM »
Yesterday, crew was told to shield in some well-protected place in the ISS because of the solar flare.

https://ria.ru/space/20170911/1502225088.html

It was a wrong information, according to http://tass.ru/kosmos/4553707
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #27 on: 09/13/2017 05:27 AM »
ISS config. after MS-06 docking

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #28 on: 09/15/2017 08:56 AM »
September 14, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-107

Minnesota Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on International Space Station

Less than a week after arriving on the International Space Station, Expedition 53 Flight Engineer Mark Vande Hei will speak with students from the Pine River-Backus Schools in Pine River, Minnesota, at 10:40 a.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 18. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Vande Hei will answer questions from kindergarten to 12th -grade students assembled at the Pine River-Backus Schools.

Vande Hei launched to the space station on Tuesday, Sept. 12. He is scheduled to return to Earth in late February.

For more information on the downlink, contact Troy Gregory at 218-587-2080 or tgregory@prbschools.org or Tina Hanneken at 218-587-8325 or thanneken@prbschools.org. 

The NASA/Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics, or STEAM, Fair will be held immediately following the NASA downlink. The fair will consist of interactive and informational stations related to STEAM subjects. The community is welcome to attend both the downlink and the fair. The downlink and fair will be held at the Pine River – Backus Schools, 401 Murray Ave. in Pine River. Use door 33 to enter the school.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #29 on: 09/15/2017 12:50 PM »
Sergey and MARES in Columbus module
« Last Edit: 09/15/2017 12:58 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #30 on: 09/17/2017 09:37 AM »
ISS Config., after Dragon CRS-12 departure...

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #31 on: 09/18/2017 02:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/11/2017

Posted on September 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lung Tissue Operations and Removal:  On Saturday, the crew took samples and fixed media in the Tissue Bags, before inserting them in to a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  After completing the experiment, the crew disassembled the Lung Tissue hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Tropical Cyclone Irma: On Sunday, the crew configured the cameras in the Cupola and took a third set of pictures of Hurricane Irma. This is the first time the Tropical Cyclone investigation has captured three sets of pictures from the same storm.  Last week, Hurricane Irma peaked as a Category 5 for three days with maximum sustained wind at 185 miles per hour (mph). The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Lighting Effects: Over the weekend and this morning, the crew provided sleep log entries for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  Today the crew transferred the Mouse Cage Units with the mice from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to the Glove Box and performed routine maintenance operations by exchanging the waste collecting equipment, odor filters, and food cartridges.  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Control Box Replacement: Earlier today, the crew began the 2nd of 6 suites of LMM enhancements to support upcoming ACE-T6 operations. While conducting the FIR LMM Control Box replacement, the crew could not reconnect the power and data cables to complete installation of the new control box. The clocking of the connectors on the new Control Box appeared to be different than those of the Control Box that was removed, which caused the two cables to interfere with one another to the point of precluding connection of either cable. The FIR rack was closed in a safe configuration and the cables remain disconnected. A forward plan is being worked to address the clocking issue. The other enhancements in the suite can be performed independent of this anomaly. The next activity (part 3) is scheduled for Thursday. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

MELFI (Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS) Electronic Unit Removal: Last week, the crew was scheduled to remove the failed Electronic Unit (EU) from MELFI-1, to return that EU and another previously failed EU on SpX-12.  A spare EU was scheduled to be installed in MELFI-1, bringing that facility back to an operational state. However, during the removal, fluid buildup was found on one of the connectors and the activity was suspended pending development of a cleanup procedure. Today the crew collected samples of the buildup before cleaning, removing, and packing the EU for return.  The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures until those samples can be returned to the ground for analysis.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #32 on: 09/18/2017 02:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/13/2017

Posted on September 13, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

52 Soyuz (52S) Dock: 52S launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome this evening, and docked to the ISS bringing Misurkin, Acaba, and Vande Hei to the ISS. Docking to the Mini Research Module-2 (MRM-2) module was completed at 09:55 PM CDT with hatch opening at 12:08 AM CDT. The arrival of 52S increased the ISS crew complement from 3 to 6 crewmembers.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew performed a FMS session this morning. The FMS experiment is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the crew performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Multi-Omics Mouse:  Today the crew collected samples for later analysis in support of the Multi-Omics Mouse investigation.  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew conducted the fourth operations session of NanoRacks Module 9 by activating mixture tubes in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), which strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program. 

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  The crew configured single stowage lockers to accommodate rodent habitats returning on SpX-12. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector A (LEE A) Survey: Today, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and maneuvered the SSRMS to perform a survey of the LEE A latches using the P1 Lower Outboard (LOOB) External High Definition Camera (EHDC). No signs of damage was seen during the survey. The Robotics Ground Controllers also performed checkouts of LEE A in preparation for re-grappling SpaceX Dragon 12 on GMT Day 257 and of the Mobile Base System (MBS) Payload/Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Accommodation (POA) in preparation for the LEE-A/POA swap during the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) on GMT 278.  Both the LEE A and the POA checkouts were nominal.  MSS performance today was also nominal.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #33 on: 09/18/2017 02:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/14/2017

Posted on September 14, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

iPad Operating System (iOS) Upgrade:  Today the crew connected the iPad Air 2 to an Space Station Computer (SSC), allowing ground controllers to update the operating system.

Dragon Departure Preparations:  Today the crew completed a computer based training session to review the Dragon departure documentation and a Robotic Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session which included two simulated Dragon release runs. 

Commercial Orbital Transport Services (COTS) UHF Communication Unit (CUCU) Checkout:  In preparation for the upcoming SpaceX-12 unberth and release, the crew coordinated with ground teams to activate the CUCU System and perform a Crew Command Panel (CCP) checkout. The backup CCP unit was installed and checked out successfully, so the activity to change back to the prime CCP was aborted.  CCP and CUCU provides a command and telemetry communications link between ISS and Dragon during free flight operations in the vicinity of ISS.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 51S subject provided a sleep log entry, and conducted a series of 3 Cognition tests throughout the day. The subject also completed 3 of 4 urine collections, which are divided within a 24-hour period. The fourth sample will be collected tomorrow morning.  Each sample is stowed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for freezing until their return and analysis. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Gould Tribute Video: Today, a crewmember recorded a self-shooting video to pay tribute to Canadian pianist Glenn Gould. This video message will be part of a tribute concert by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra on September 22, in honor of Canadian pianist Glenn Gould, who would have turned 85 on September 25. Gould represented Canada on the “Golden Record” on board both Voyager 1 and 2. The video will also be promoted on social media.

Spaceborne Computer Installation and Checkout: The crew installed the Spaceborne Computer hardware into side-by-side EXPRESS Rack locker locations, configured the power, data, and thermal connections to the rack, before photographing the configuration and transferring the photos for downlink. Spaceborne Computer intends to run a year-long experiment of high performance commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer system on the International Space Station (ISS). During high radiation events, verify if the systems can still operate correctly by lowering their power, and therefore, speed. This research helps scientists identify ways of using software to protect ISS computers without expensive, time-consuming or bulky protective shielding.

Advanced Research Thermal Passive Exchange (ARTE) Thermal Exchange Setup and Hardware Stow: The crew completed the 2nd experiment run of the ARTE Thermal Exchange investigation. The Thermal Exchange hardware was installed in the MSG work volume, and the data was transferred from the SD card to the SSC for downlink. The hardware was then removed and stowed from the MSG. The ARTE Thermal Exchange investigation is sponsored by the Italian Space Agency (ASI); and studies the performance of a new type of heat pipe, which is a passive, low-weight device used to increase a material’s heat transfer capability. The investigation researches a new technology, called Axially Grooved Heat Pipes, which could be integrated into existing spacecraft, as well as used for future missions.

MagVector: The crew completed closeout and clean-up activities for the 13th experiment run of the MagVector investigation that began last week. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

NanoRack Platforms-1 Module Removal: The crew removed NanoRacks Modules 67 and 72 from NanoRacks Platform-1 for return on SpaceX-12.
•NanoRack Module 67: NanoRacks-NDC-Ames for Space-Bacteria Testing determines whether bacteria mutate at a different rate in the microgravity environment of space. The experiments extend previous work on virulence in space by exposing different batches of bacteria to toxins known to cause mutations. Automated equipment tests and photographs batches of bacteria contained within different concentrations of toxins so that the observed mutation rates can be compared with those observed from control groups on Earth.
•NanoRack Module 72: NanoRacks-CUBERIDER-1 (NanoRacks-CR-1) is an educational module that runs on computer code written by 9th and 10th graders. Students program sensors on NanoRacks-CR-1 to record data on the microgravity environment and conduct tests aboard the station and then send results back to Earth. Through this investigation, students devise their own experiments and experience space science firsthand.

The NanoRack Platform is a multipurpose research facility that supports NanoRacks Modules by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  To prepare for RR-9 Live Animal Return (LAR) activities, the crew will participated in a crew conference they setup and powered on the LAR transporters returning on SpX-12. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

Tangolab-1 Card Cube Removal:  The crew removed two cards from the TangoLab-1 facility and inserted them into the Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL). The cards contain one experiment to study genetic mutations in fruit flies and one to study Carbon Dioxide scrubbing in cactus. TangoLab-1 is a reconfigurable general research facility designed for microgravity research and development and pilot manufacturing aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Polar Sample Transfer from MELFI: The crew transferred samples from MELFI-1 and MELFI-2 to the four returning Polars using -32°C Ice Bricks and a Double Coldbag in preparation for SpaceX-12 descent.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #34 on: 09/18/2017 02:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/15/2017

Posted on September 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Node 1 Communication:  Ground teams utilized the video conferencing system to patch Space to Ground channel 2 (S/G2) to an SSC in Node 1, and asked the crew to confirm that S/G2 voice was audible in Node 1.  Two separate configurations were tested, and both were confirmed to be audible.  Neither video nor return (ISS calling the ground) audio was enabled.  The ability to hear S/G2 calls in Node 1 has been a highly desired function.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 51S subject provided a sleep log entry, and conducted the last of four urine collections, that were divided within a 24-hour period.  The sample was stowed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for freezing until their return and analysis. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Space Headaches: The crew completed questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Sarcolab-3:  Today the crew set up and configured the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) facility in the Columbus module for Sarcolab-3 operations next week.  They installed the Ankle configuration and Electromyograph and Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) devices on MARES.  The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post-flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew activated mixture tubes for the fifth NanoRacks Module 9 operations session in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), hat strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  The crew removed a Tissue cassette and two Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP. The Tissue cassette will be inserted in the Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL) and the CellCult cassettes will be inserted into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes is used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or tele-operated.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  The crew completed the RR-9 Live Animal Return (LAR) activities, by activating the lixits, installing food bars, and transferring the animals into the LAR transporters returning on SpX-12. The animals are safely stowed on SpX-12 and are ready for their return to Earth.  The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

CASIS Protein Crystal Growth PCG-6: The crew deactivated and inserted three PCG samples into the Minus Eight-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI-2). Neutron Crystallographic Studies of Human Acetylcholinesterase for the Design of Accelerated Reactivators (CASIS PCG 6) produces crystals of acetylcholinesterase, a medically important neurotransmitter enzyme. Crystals grown in microgravity are larger and higher-quality and can be used for the technique called macromolecular neutron crystallography (MNC) to locate hydrogen atoms in the crystal structure. These hydrogen atoms play critical roles in the enzyme function and knowing their location clarifies that function. This advances development of better antidotes to fatal Organophosphate nerve agents, which act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase in the nervous system.

CASIS Protein Crystal Growth (PCG-7): The crew inserted 10 PCG samples into to the Minus Eight-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI-2). Crystallization of LRRK2 Under Microgravity Conditions (CASIS PCG 7) uses the microgravity environment aboard the ISS to grow larger versions of an important protein, LRRK2, implicated in Parkinson’s disease. Defining the exact shape and morphology of LRRK2 would help scientists better understand the pathology of Parkinson’s and aid in the development of therapies against this target, but gravity keeps Earth-grown versions of this protein too small and too compact to study. CASIS PCG 7 uses automated biotechnology devices to grow larger versions of this protein in space, which are then returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Dragon Packing:  Today the crew packed and loaded items into the SpaceX-12 Dragon capsule for return to Earth.

Dragon Grapple:  Overnight, the Station Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) was maneuvered from the post-Latching End Effector (LEE) A survey park position to the SpX-12 Dragon capture position. SSRMS then grappled Dragon nominally. The SSRMS was powered down to Dual String Keep Alive (DSKA). Dragon release is scheduled for this Sunday.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #35 on: 09/20/2017 12:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/18/2017

Posted on September 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Dragon SpaceX (SpX)-12 Unberth:  Over the weekend, the crew packed critical items and egressed the vehicle in preparation for Dragon departure.  Dragon was unberthed from the ISS via ground commanding on Saturday at approximately 5:06 PM CDT.  Ground teams then maneuvered the Dragon to an overnight park position.  Early Sunday morning at 03:41 AM CDT, Dragon was released, with splashdown occurring roughly five and a half hours later.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  On Saturday, the crew transferred the Mouse Habitat Cage Units from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF), to the Transportation Cage Units for return on SpaceX-12. Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  On Saturday, the Tissue cassette that was inserted into the Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL) on Friday, was removed and returned on SpX-12. ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes is used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or tele-operated.

Lighting Effects: Over the weekend, a 51S crewmember provided sleep log entries for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Space Headaches: Over the weekend and today, a 52S crewmember completed daily questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Marrow:  With operator assistance, a 52S crewmember collected blood samples for the Marrow investigation. The breath and ambient air sample collection was aborted due to an issue with the collection hardware. After resolving the hardware issue, the breath and ambient collection operations was rescheduled for tomorrow. The blood samples were processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 51S crewmember  performed a series of urine collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments.  The urine samples were collected and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The blood samples will be collected tomorrow.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Sarcolab-3:  Prior to conducting the operations segment of the Sarcolab-3 investigation, the crew completed setup activities for Ultrasound 2. Then, with assistance from a Russian operator, a USOS crewmember ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol which is ongoing.  The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s leg. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Zero Boil-OFF Tank (ZBOT) Hardware Setup: Today the crew configured the majority of the ZBOT hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume and will complete the remaining setup activities tomorrow. The final configuration will be photographed for historical documentation. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #36 on: 09/20/2017 02:15 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/19/2017

Posted on September 19, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Space Headaches: The daily questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation was completed by a 52S crewmember.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Marrow:  Today the crew successfully collected the breath and ambient air samples that were not able to be completed yesterday due to an issue with the collection hardware.  The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 51S crewmember completed the urine sample collections that began yesterday in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. With operator assistance, the subject also conducted blood sample collections and the samples were processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Zero Boil-OFF Tank (ZBOT) Hardware Setup: The crew completed the ZBOT hardware configuration in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume that began yesterday. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Meteor Grating Configuration: The crew removed and replaced gratings in the Meteor camera located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) payload volume. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Space Test Program – H5 Innovative Coatings Experiment (STP-H5 ICE): The crew photographed four ICE material strips on STP-H5. The harsh radiation and extreme temperatures of space can corrode the paint and coatings that protect spacecraft exteriors, potentially damaging a spacecraft’s hull. Optical coatings are also important for robotic and human navigators, who would rely on specialized markings to capture or repair spacecraft. The STP-H5 ICE investigation studies new coatings for use on spacecraft in low-Earth orbit, determining their stability after 2 years in space.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew began configuration activities for the CIR optics bench which supports the ACME investigation. Due to the amount of hardware requiring installation, configuration activities will be conducted over the next two days. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Fast Neutron Spectrometer: The crew completed the installation of the Fast Neutron Spectrometer in Node 1. Neutron spectrometers are used to make a wide range of measurements, including studies of a planetary body’s composition and measuring the flux of high-energy neutrons that could be harmful to humans. The Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FNS) investigation studies a new neutron measurement technique that is better suited for the mixed radiation fields found in deep space. Future manned and exploration missions benefit from clearer, more error-free measurement of the neutron flux present in an environment with multiple types of radiation.

Sarcolab-3:  With USOS operator assistance, a Russian subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol.  The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s leg. The subject is continuing the Sarcolab protocol.  The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) Resize:  Today the crew will continue activities to prepare for the upcoming EVAs.  They will resize EMUS to fit the specific crewmembers that will go outside during those upcoming EVAs.  The goals of the EVAs include performing an R&R on the SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE) A, lubrication of the LEEs, and external camera replacement.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #37 on: 09/21/2017 02:21 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/20/2017

Posted on September 20, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember collected breath and ambient air samples for the Marrow investigation which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew configured the CIR optics bench that will be used to support the ACME investigation. Due to the amount of hardware requiring installation, configuration activities took a couple of days this week to complete. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Sarcolab-3: Today a USOS subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, located in the Columbus module, while a Russian operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg during exercise activities. This completed the third and final day of the ankle configuration exercises, which were performed by three different USOS and Russian crewmembers. Later today, the MARES hardware was re-configured to support tomorrow’s knee configuration exercises. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post-flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss. Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Multi-Omics-Mouse Consolidation:  Following the successful completion and return of the Multi-Omics investigation last week, the crew completed item consolidation tasks and returned the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) back to its nominal configuration.

EVA Preparation:  In preparation for the upcoming EVAs, the crew completed Enhanced Caution and Warning System (EWCS) training and EMU battery charging.

S-Band String 2 Troubleshooting: Yesterday, the ground team swapped S-Band string 1 to string 2 to gain confidence in its performance. On August 6, 2017, String 2 S-Band/UHF Audio Interface (AUAI)-1P showed intermittent functionality after an AUAI Passive Built-In Test (PBIT) fault indication. Space to Ground (S/G) audio on channels 1 and 2 became unusable. Functionality was recovered by switching to S-band string 1. Since the event, multiple attempts to duplicate the signature have been unsuccessful. The plan is to remain on string 2 until the schedule USOS EVAs in early October.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #38 on: 09/21/2017 05:15 PM »
Randy, Joe and Paolo at work in Destiny Lab...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #39 on: 09/23/2017 08:36 AM »
September 21, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-109

Students at National Air and Space Museum to Speak with Space Station Astronaut 

Students at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 12:25 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 27, as part of a “STEM in 30” broadcast. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik will speak with students assembled at the museum. Bresnik launched to the space station on July 29 and is expected to return to Earth in December.

The following schools in the Washington area will participate at the museum:

•Providence Elementary School
•Washington Mathematics, Science and Technology
•Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering High School
•Capitol Hill Montessori School @ Logan
•West Education Campus
•Stuart-Hobson Middle School
•Cardozo Education Campus
•Dunbar High School
•Whittier Education Campus

“STEM in 30” is the National Air and Space Museum’s fast-paced webcast series that engages middle school students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) topics in just 30 minutes. The program features museum curators, astronauts and experts in the field to connect classrooms with real-world, relevant content. The “STEM in 30” team has collaborated with Bresnik on a series of videos titled “ISS Science” that bring the excitement of space travel into classrooms across the country by combining explanations of real-world topics, classroom friendly demonstrations and lesson plans for teachers to extend the learning.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM subjects. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 09/23/2017 08:52 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/21/2017

Posted on September 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sarcolab-3: After successfully completing three days of the ankle configuration exercises, today USOS and Russian subjects conducted the knee protocol for Sarcolab-3. The subjects ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installed the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes and began the knee exercise protocol, while an operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Payload On-Orbit Still Shots for Utilization and Maintenance (POSSUM) Payload Photo: The crew took digital photos of all payload racks in the US Lab, JEM Pressurized Module (JPM), and Columbus module to document configuration changes.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A crewmember completed a FMS session which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Tropical Cyclone Maria: The crew setup and configured camera settings, before capturing images of Hurricane Maria to support the Tropical Cyclone investigation.  The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember completed breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  Today the crew completed an audit of the Rodent Research -9 hardware and supplies. The RR-9 investigation was successfully completed and returned on SpaceX-12 last week. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

Multi-Omics-Mouse Closeout The crew performed Multi-Omics closeout activities by removing the Mouse Habitat Units from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF), cleaning and taking photos of the glove box, and reconfiguring the video cables between the Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) and the CBEF.

Manufacturing Device (MD) Operations: The crew removed and replaced the MD feedstock canister, extruder, and print tray. The Manufacturing Device – Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) enables the production of components on the ISS for both NASA and commercial objectives. Parts, entire experiments, and tools can be created on demand utilizing the AMF that is installed into an Express Rack locker location. The AMF is capable of producing parts out of a wide variety of thermopolymers including engineered plastics.

N3 Aft Port Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Fan Inlet Cleaning: The crew cleaned this location to remove Foreign Object Debris (FOD) from IMV fan inlets and silencers.

Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) Training: In preparation for the upcoming EVAs in October, two US crewmembers were scheduled to perform virtual reality (VR) training simulating emergency recovery using SAFER. In the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA, SAFER can be used to safely maneuver for recovery.  During the first session, there were some configuration issues, but once the configuration issues were resolved there were still some issues with executing the session.  Both of today’s sessions were deferred until the ground specialists can further review.

Advance Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Upper Rack Cable Kinked: Today, the crew reported a reoccurrence of the ARED Upper Rack cable kinking.  No cable damage was reported.  The crew straightened the cable and took imagery for ground review. This is the second instance of this cable kinking this week.  There are spare cables on-orbit.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 09/28/2017 05:39 PM »
September 28, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-111

South Carolina Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students at Laing Middle School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, near Charleston, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:30 a.m. EDT Monday, Oct. 2. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 53 Commander Col. Randy Bresnik is a member of The Citadel class of 1989. He will answer questions from students at Laing Middle School. The school is hosting the event with the help of Citadel cadets and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. Cadets will lead the younger students as they pose questions to the Citadel astronaut alumnus.

Bresnik launched to the space station July 28 and is expected to return to Earth in December. A Marine Corps veteran, Bresnik is one of the college’s most visible principled leaders. In May of 2004, Bresnik was selected from among 4,000 applicants to become one of the 11 members of NASA’s Astronaut Class 9 and the first graduate of The Citadel to fly in space. Expedition 52/53 is Bresnik’s second mission to the space station; the first was in 2009.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Kim Keelor at kkeelor@citadel.edu. Laing Middle School is at 2705 Bulrush Basket Lane in Mt. Pleasant.

The cadets will lead a two-part event for the eighth-grade students, visiting the class first to teach them about Bresnik, the space station, how the live downlink works and conduct an in-class lesson related to the space station. On Oct. 2, they will lead the conversation with Bresnik, guiding the participating students as they ask questions that are expected to revolve around Bresnik’s work with space station experiments and space fitness. Middle school students across the South Carolina Lowcountry and cadets on The Citadel campus are expected to watch the event on NASA TV.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

Learn about videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 09/28/2017 05:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/22/2017

Posted on September 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow:  Today a 52S crewmember conducted breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Sarcolab-3: A USOS subject conducted the knee protocol for Sarcolab-3. The subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installed the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes and began the knee exercise protocol, while an operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. The crew deconfigured and stowed MARES, which was originally on the timeline for next Monday. Today’s activity concludes five consecutive days of joint research, where three crewmembers conducted a series of ankle and knee configuration exercises.  The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S crewmember collected blood sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. With operator assistance, the subject is collecting blood samples and the samples will be processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Advanced NanoStep: The crew completed setup activities prior to installing the Advanced NanoStep cartridge in the Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF). JAXA’s Advanced NanoStep experiment investigates the relationship between impurity incorporation mechanisms and the quality of obtained protein crystals should be clarified for the progress to an “advanced” stage of the space utilization for structure-based drug design. In this mission, we observe the protein crystal growth surfaces of glucose isomerase crystals in space in the presence of various impurities with the use of a Michelson interferometer. In addition, we also clarify the crystal surface morphology on the molecular step level by using the laser confocal microscope. We evaluate the crystal quality of the returned crystals.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) Chamber Cap Removal and Cartridge Installation:  The crew removed the ELF chamber cap from the chamber hole and installed the sample cartridge. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by container less processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Cable Re-clock: During last week’s LMM control box replacement, two cables were left disconnected due to physical interference of back shells on adjacent power/data cables. Today, the crew re-clocked the connector that mates to the LMM Control Box to remove the interference of the cable connection. LMM is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization (DECLIC) Hose Reseat: The crew removed and reconnected the DECLIC supply and return hoses to troubleshoot the moderate temperature loop flow issues to the DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert (DSI). DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The DSI portion of the DECLIC multi-user facility experiment will study a series of benchmark experiments on transparent alloys that freeze like metals under microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using SCN (succinonitrile-a transparent organic substance in the liquid state that is used to study the phenomena related to solidification processes) based alloys. The DSI insert will be installed for the second run of the three series of DECLIC experiments.

RED Camera Calibration: The crew created calibration files for the RED Dragon Camera in support of the Earth Imagery from ISS investigation. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation will help create a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 09/28/2017 05:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/25/2017

Posted on September 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Over the weekend a 52S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 15 urine sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. Today another 52S crewmember completed their FD-15 urine samples, and with operator assistance, conducted blood sample collections. The blood samples were processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by stowing the test hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, before performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The completed tests were photographed and downlinked. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) Exercise Evaluation:  51S crewmembers exercised using MED-2 with body markers and multiple camcorders for ground evaluation. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Gas Chromatograph (GC) Installation: The crew installed the GC instrument package to support continued operations of the CIR for the upcoming ACME investigation. During the installation, the crew cleaned and contained a small leak that was noticed from a helium bottle. In an activity unrelated to today’s GC installation package, the crew checked a suspected bad cable connection to see if it was the cause of current Image Processing and Storage Unit (IPSU) data issues. After reporting that the connection appeared to be fully mated, the crew was asked to break and reseat the connector before downlinking photos for ground teams to assess. The CIR is used to perform combustion experiments in microgravity. The CIR can be reconfigured easily on orbit to accommodate a variety of combustion experiments. It consists of an optics bench, a combustion chamber, a fuel and oxidizer management system, environmental management systems, and interfaces for science diagnostics and experiment specific equipment.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A 51S crewmember completed a FD 60 FMS session which is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Setup and Activation: The crew setup the payload components for EarthKAM in Node 2 for a week-long imaging session. Sally Ride EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

MagVector: Because the generically used MagVector USB stick was reported broken, the crew retrieved a new USB stick to support the 14th MagVector experiment run that begins later this week.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

EVA preparations:  Today the crew inspected tethers and modified the Ballscrew Lubrication Tool (BLT) depth gauge.  These tasks are required to prepare for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include R&R of one SSRMS LEE, lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 09/28/2017 05:52 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/26/2017

Posted on September 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember completed their Flight Day (FD) 60 breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

BioLab Glovebox Health Check: Today the crew exchanged the BioLab Glovebox gloves with new ones, and performed periodic health check of the BioLab Glovebox seals and gloves including sensors for the fan status, delta pressure, temperature and relative humidity. This procedure can also be used to perform individual ground-only checks of the Biolab Glovebox pressure, temperature, relative humidity and fan status. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the Columbus laboratory. It is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates.  BioLab allows scientists to study the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab Double Sensors and mount the Thermolab Unit to their belt, which will begin 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythms investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 52S crewmember completed their Flight Day (FD) 15 urine sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. A 52S crewmember completed their FD-60 urine samples, and with operator assistance, conduct blood sample collections. The blood samples will be processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew setup and configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained the Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Gas Valve Open: The crew manually opened the EMCS Gas Valves, which is conducted within 24 hours prior to the start of the EMCS Experiment. The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) is an ESA experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions (e.g. temperature, atmospheric composition, water supply, illumination, observation, and gravity). The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms. Experiments with insects, amphibia, and invertebrates as well as studies with cell and tissue cultures are also foreseen in EMCS.

VEG-03: The crew completed on-board training and installed the Root Mat and Plant Pillows. They powered up and set intervals, before filling Root Mats in support of the VEG-03 experiment. Veg-03 is a direct follow-on to the Veg-01 hardware validation test, which demonstrated plant growth in the Veggie facility. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. But future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew reviewed EVA tasks, configured tools, performed EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) fit verifications, and performed Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) checkouts in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 09/28/2017 05:52 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/27/2017

Posted on September 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from the Russian crewmembers, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the Radi-N experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation will be conducted by measuring neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

At Home in Space Questionnaire and Photo:  The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire and took photos to document ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: The Crew setup and activated the JEM Camera Robot before assisting ground teams with the 4th flight checkout activity. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

Veggie-01 Installation: The crew assembled the veggie hardware before installing it into the EXPRESS Rack, and conducting checkout activities. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation. The Veggie facility provides lighting and nutrient delivery, but utilizes the cabin environment for temperature control and as a source of carbon dioxide to promote growth.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 51S crewmember completed the Flight Day (FD) 60 urine sample collection that began yesterday in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember conducted breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew reviewed EVA procedures, conducted a conference with EVA specialists on the ground to review procedures, prepared the Contingency Water Container (CWC) and configured EVA tools in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

ISS Reboost – Today ground teams commanded an ISS reboost using the Aft Progress (67P) thrusters. This reboost set up the proper conditions for a 2-Orbit rendezvous profile for the 68 Progress arrival on 10/12/17. This maneuver was the first of three burns to set up the proper conditions for the 51S landing (12/14/17) and the 53S launch and docking (12/17/17). The second burn is expected to occur on 11/02/17 and the third is expected to occur on 11/22/17.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 10/01/2017 07:46 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/28/2017
Posted on September 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

MagVector: The crew completed setup activities and began the 7-day MagVector #14 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

At Home in Space Questionnaire and Photo:  The crew took photos to document ISS culture in support of the At Home in Space investigation. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Circadian Rhythms: The 51S crewmember removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36 hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Tuesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Two Phase Flow:  The crew setup the Two Phase Flow laptop in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).  The Two Phase Flow investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: Following yesterday’s checkout activities, today the crew conducted a cable swap to allow the ground team to perform a software update. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

Meteor Hard Disk Drive and Antivirus Update: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) and transfered an updated Antivirus file to the laptop.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) DECLIC Hose Relocation: The DECLIC supply and return hoses from the Upper Control Panel (UCP) to the Lower Control Panel (LCP) were relocated to continue troubleshooting the moderate temperature loop (MTL) flow issues to the DECLIC directional solidification insert (DSL). DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The DSI portion of the DECLIC multi-user facility experiment will study a series of benchmark experiments on transparent alloys that freeze like metals under microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using SCN (succinonitrile-a transparent organic substance in the liquid state that is used to study the phenomena related to solidification processes) based alloys. The DSI insert will be installed for the second run of the three series of DECLIC experiments.

Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) Hardware Setup and Control Run:
The crew performed a SLAMMD control run by setting up the calibration arm and attaching the calibration mass, prior to setting the software to implement a control run and payload body mass measurement. SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crewmember mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass. The device is accurate to 0.5 pounds over a range from 90 pounds to 240 pounds.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew configured EVA tools, inspected the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) Sublimators, performed an EMU loop scrub, filled the Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG), recharged the EMU water, and performed a conductivity test on that water in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 10/03/2017 07:07 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/29/2017

Posted on September 29, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
VEG-03: Following the installation of the Root Mat and Plant Pillows earlier this week, the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 Plant Pillow. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate types of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna for on-orbit harvesting and return to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans; future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food and understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal.

Space Headaches:  The weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation was completed by 51S crewmembers.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information which may help in the development of new methods to alleviate the symptoms associated with headaches in space and improve the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers and negatively influence performance during a space mission.

Mobile Procedure Viewer (MobiPV):  Today the crew completed checkout activities for the MobiPV investigation. MobiPV allows users to view procedures hands-free and aims to improve the efficiency of activity execution by giving crewmembers a wireless set of wearable, portable devices that utilize voice navigation and provide a direct audio/video links to ground experts.  A smartphone is the primary device used by crew to interface with procedures and capability exists to display pictures provided in procedure steps on a Google Glass display.   

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC) Configuration: To prepare for upcoming ACE-T6 operations, the crew configured the LMM for confocal operations. The LMM observation camera, objective lenses, control base, and the confocal test target will be installed inside the LMM AFC. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 65 FMS session by performing a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet. The FMS investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) On-Orbit Fitcheck Verification:  Today the crew completed pressurized fitchecks on EMU 3003 and 3008 in order to assess fit and feel of the suits prior to the upcoming series of Octobers EVAs. After the initial fitchecks were completed, the resizing of necessary components was successfully accomplished to ensure proper range of motion during the EVAs. The goals of the upcoming EVAs include: Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the two LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

PMM Hygiene Cover Installation:  The crew installed a series of hygiene covers and privacy curtains into the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) in order to protect hardware from free water and provide the crew increased privacy during personal hygiene activities. 

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 10/04/2017 06:43 AM »
The report of Oct 2 is a carbon copy of Sep 29.
Somebody at NASA apparently was not fully awake after the weekend...  ;D


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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 10/05/2017 06:37 AM »
October 04, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-118

Michigan Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station


Students at St. Mary Cathedral School in Gaylord, Michigan, will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11 a.m. EDT Friday, Oct. 6. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Twenty northern Michigan students, grades preschool through high school, will be invited to ask the astronauts questions about living in space aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, or any other topic that interests the students.

For Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik, this is his second mission to the International Space Station. Bresnik launched to the space station on July 28 and is expected to return to Earth in December. Joe Acaba arrived at the space station Sept. 12 for his third mission to space. Bresnik and Acaba will participate in three spacewalks this month to service the space station’s robotic arm and install new external cameras.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Christie Perdue at 231-409-1214. St. Mary Cathedral School is at 606 N. Ohio Ave. in Gaylord.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 10/05/2017 06:38 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/03/2017

Posted on October 3, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
VEG-03 Operations: Today the crew continued to conduct Veg-03 operations that began last week by thinning out the plants to one plant per pillow, in order to promote growth of the larger plants. The crew then watered the plant pillows. The crew will now begin the autonomous space gardening phase of the experiment.  The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna. The first crew consumption harvest should be in about 3-4 weeks.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Change: Following the completion of last month’s Multi-Omics Mouse investigation, today the crew continued to perform closeout activities by changing the configuration of the CBEF from the Multi-Omics configuration, back to its nominal configuration. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Clean Bench (CB) Valve Checkout: The crew conducted standard maintenance on the CB relief valves and the microscope stage clips, located inside the Saibo Rack. This maintenance activity is performed every 6 months to prevent the valves from sticking. The CB is a glovebox with a High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter and a high-performance optical microscope.

Story Time from Space: Two crewmembers participated in the Story Time from Space activity by reading “Max Goes to Mars” and “Sunset” on camera. The video recordings will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations:  EVA preparations continued today with setup of Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) and camera configuration and battery charging.  A trio of EVAs will begin with the Latching End Effector (LEE) R&R EVA on Thursday.

Eye Exams:  Two crewmembers underwent eye exams using the onboard ultrasound device.  Periodic eye exams are critical for monitoring crew health.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 10/05/2017 02:28 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/04/2017

Posted on October 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval:  Today a USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment, and transferred them to the Russian crewmember for processing in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew performed EVA tether inspections, tool configurations, cuff checklist printing, scheduled health checkups, and procedure reviews in preparation for the tomorrow’s EVA.  The primary goal of tomorrow’s EVAs is to Remove and Replace (R&R) a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE) which had been exhibiting some anomalies in its operation.

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Speed Test – Today, ground controllers began a 7 day test of the Lab CDRA using higher blower speeds. The CDRA blower speed will be gradually increased to determine the ability of the CDRA blower to operate at increased speeds without triggering software responses to excessive speed and to evaluate impacts of elevated speed to the blower.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 10/06/2017 10:12 AM »
https://twitter.com/edbirchnall/status/916020433014706176
Quote
And tomorrow the ground will put #Canadarm2 back to work using the new LEE to walk to a new base and get ready for the next space walk.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 10/09/2017 03:09 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/05/2017

Posted on October 5, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #44: Today Randy Bresnik (as EV1) and Mark Vande Hei (as EV2) exited the airlock and successfully performed US EVA #44 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6:55. The primary goal of today’s EVA was to remove the degraded Latching End Effector (LEE) A from the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS), replace it with the LEE that is currently located on the Payload/ORU Accommodation (POA), and install the degraded LEE onto the POA.  LEE-A had exhibited significantly increased resistance to latch deployment during recent robotics activities prompting today’s replacement. Today’s EVA brought the SSRMS back to full capability.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): This morning, a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 70 FMS session, which is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

MagVector:  The crew completed the 14th experiment run of the MagVector investigation that began last week. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Biological Experiment Laboratory in Columbus (BioLab) Temperature Control Unit Cleaning and Silica Bag Exchange: The crew cleaned the Biolab TCUs and exchanged the silica gel bags for TCUs 1 and 2. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the European Columbus laboratory. The facility is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates. BioLab allows scientists to gain a better understanding of the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 10/10/2017 02:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/09/2017

Posted on October 9, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember collected fecal samples for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew photodocumented the status of the plants in the Veggie facility, and evaluated the plant pillows to determine if additional watering is required. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) 45 Preparation: Today the crew reconfigured necessary EVA tools, reviewed procedures, and participated in a conference with ground EVA planners in support of next week’s EVA.  The goals of this EVA include: Removal and Replacement of the degraded CP9 camera and lubrication of the Latching End Effector (LEE) B.

External Robotics Operations:  Over the weekend, robotics ground controllers walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) onto Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 3 (PDGF3).  They then maneuvered SSRMS as required to perform a video and imagery survey of the Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) snare cables using an External High Definition Camera (EHDC).  Once the survey was completed, the SSRMS was walked off onto MBS PDGF4 in preparation of US EVA 45 scheduled tomorrow (GMT 283).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 10/11/2017 03:27 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/10/2017

Posted on October 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #45: Today Randy Bresnik (as EV1) and Mark Vande Hei (as EV2) successfully performed US EVA #45 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6:26. The primary goal of today’s EVA was to Remove and Replace (R&R) the External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) located at Camera Port 9 (CP9) and to lubricate the newly installed Latching End Effector (LEE) A on the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS). The LEE A was installed onto the SSRMS last week during USOS EVA #44.  Additional tasks accomplished include: Airlock High Pressure Gas Tank (HPGT) handle tie back, rotation of the Pump/Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS), R&R of the Mobile Base System (MBS) mast Camera/Light/PTU Assembly (CLPA) lens cover, removal of a handrail from Node 3, and BDCU MLI Removal.

At Home in Space:  The crew took photographs today to document the current on-orbit ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 10/12/2017 01:34 PM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/918286374096183296
Quote
Ops complete for tonight. #Canadarm2 is in position for tomorrows ops - picking up #Dextre and getting ready for Friday's RPCM R&R...

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 10/14/2017 07:36 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/11/2017

Posted on October 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

NeuroMapping: Today two 52S crewmembers set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed their Flight Day 30 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crewmembers executed three Behavioral Assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): To support the ACME payload investigation, the crew disconnected water umbilicals at the CIR Z-Panel to remove water pressure from the rack and then removed the Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) from the CIR combustion chamber for the final time. The ACME chamber insert for the first set of test points was configured and connected into the CIR Combustion Chamber.  After the water umbilicals were reconnected to the Z-Panel, the crew performed a leak check. Due to the amount of hardware requiring installation, activities will be conducted over the next two days. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Post Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Tasks: Today crewmembers participated in an EVA debrief conference with ground specialists, preformed battery maintenance, and serviced the water system on the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) used during yesterday’s EVA. During US EVA #45 the crew successfully Removed and Replaced (R&R) the External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) located at Camera Port 9 (CP9) and lubricated the newly installed Latching End Effector (LEE) A on the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS). 

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 10/14/2017 07:36 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/12/2017

Posted on October 12, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

68P Launch and Dock Delay:  68P was planned for launch at 04:30 AM Central time, but the launch was aborted during final countdown.  Russian teams are looking into the cause of the abort.  The next launch opportunity is Saturday morning at 03:47 AM Central, with docking two days later on Monday morning.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember collected saliva samples and completed a questionnaire for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Maintenance: The crew performed maintenance activities in the CIR by replacing a window and the CIR Interface Resource Ring (IRR) vent filter inside the combustion chamber due to fuel and combustion by-product buildup. The CIR is used to perform combustion experiments in microgravity. The CIR can be reconfigured easily on orbit to accommodate a variety of combustion experiments. It consists of an optics bench, a combustion chamber, a fuel and oxidizer management system, environmental management systems, and interfaces for science diagnostics and experiment specific equipment.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew continued to conduct ACME insertion configurations that began yesterday, by disconnecting water umbilicals at CIR Z-Panel to remove water pressure from the rack and then remove the Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) from the CIR combustion chamber for the final time. The ACME chamber insert for the first set of test points was configured and connected into the CIR combustion chamber.  After the water umbilicals were reconnected to Z-Panel, the crew checked for leaks. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 75 FMS session executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trends/varies over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trends/varies before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew checked and photo documented the status of the plants in the Veggie facility, and evaluated the plant pillows to determine if additional watering was required. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew reconfigured necessary EVA tools and resized an EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) in support of next week’s EVA.  The goals of this EVA include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the degraded CP13 camera and lubrication of the Latching End Effector (LEE) B.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 10/15/2017 08:43 AM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/918286374096183296
Quote
Ops complete for tonight. #Canadarm2 is in position for tomorrows ops - picking up #Dextre and getting ready for Friday's RPCM R&R...
It seems, that this task was also delayed to next week.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 10/16/2017 01:40 PM »
ISS confi. updated, after Progress MS-07/68P docking

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 10/16/2017 03:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/13/2017

Posted on October 13, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Advanced Nano Step Troubleshooting: Today the crew successfully completed troubleshooting operations by retrieving the Advanced Nano Step cartridge from the Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF) to access and adjust the position of the cell stage, due to movement issues during the sample observation.  JAXA’s Advanced Nano Step experiment investigates the relationship between impurity incorporation mechanisms and the quality of obtained protein crystals should be clarified for the progress to an “advanced” stage of the space utilization for structure-based drug design. In this mission, we observe the protein crystal growth surfaces of glucose isomerase crystals in space in the presence of various impurities with the use of a Michelson interferometer. In addition, we also clarify the crystal surface morphology on the molecular step level by using the laser confocal microscope. We evaluate the crystal quality of the returned crystals.

Lighting Effects:  A 51S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crewquarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The completed tests will be photographed and downlinked. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Hardware Configuration: To prepare for upcoming ACE-T6 operations, the crew configured the back of the optics bench for the LMM upgrades for confocal operations. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew continued to conduct ACME insertion configurations that began earlier this week by setting the CIR valve timers to limit fuel and oxygen into the CIR combustion chamber. The crew also removed and replaced a CIR manifold bottle and a CIR absorber cartridge. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) DECLIC Hose Relocation: Following last month’s hose relocation to troubleshoot the moderate temperature loop (MTL) flow issues to the DECLIC directional solidification insert (DSL), today the crew returned the DECLIC water supply and return hoses from the Lower Control Panel to the Upper Control Panel, and re-connected the GLACIER water supply and return hoses into the Lower Control Panel.  DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The DSI portion of the DECLIC multi-user facility experiment will study a series of benchmark experiments on transparent alloys that freeze like metals under microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using SCN (succinonitrile-a transparent organic substance in the liquid state that is used to study the phenomena related to solidification processes) based alloys. The DSI insert will be installed for the second run of the three series of DECLIC experiments.

Space Headaches:  The weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation was completed by the crew.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew reviewed preliminary EVA procedures, conducted a conference with ground specialists, and charged batteries in preparation for next week’s EVA. The goals of USOS EVA #46 include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the degraded CP13 camera and R&R of the Latching End Effector (LEE) A Camera Lens Assembly (CLA).

External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) Maintenance:  Today the crew performed maintenance procedures required to prep an ETVCG for future installation at Camera Port 13 (CP13). The ETVCGs provide external views of the station and provide enhanced situational awareness as well as views of the Earth from space.

Extravehicular Robotic Operations: Last night the ground controllers powered up and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to grapple the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). SPDM Arm2 was used to unstow Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT) #2 from the Tool Holster Assembly (THA) and SPDM Arms and Body were configured in preparation for the Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B-B Remove and Replace activity.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 10/17/2017 01:04 AM »
Right now, RPCM R&R in progress....
« Last Edit: 10/17/2017 01:07 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 10/17/2017 06:17 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 6: Secret of Int-Ball’s round body



Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 10/17/2017 07:51 AM »
RPCM is out of its slot! Getting ready to setup on console. Midnight shift space robotics!
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/920135215212789760
« Last Edit: 10/17/2017 08:02 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #65 on: 10/17/2017 08:54 AM »
Dextre at work...
« Last Edit: 10/17/2017 10:10 AM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #66 on: 10/17/2017 10:14 AM »
« Last Edit: 10/17/2017 12:12 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 10/17/2017 01:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/16/2017

Posted on October 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

68 Progress (68P) docking:  Saturday morning, 68P launched from Baikonur after a two day delay.  This morning, 68P docked successfully to DC1 nadir, bringing supplies to the ISS.

JAXA Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) #13 Installation:  Following the docking of 68P,  a crewmember stowed two canister bags containing protein samples in the JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2). This experiment will run from today through removal for return on Soyuz 51S.  The canisters contain protein samples prepared by Japanese and Russian researchers from universities, national research institutes, and the private sector. The purpose of this activity is to obtain high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment at 20 degrees C for about 9 weeks. The results obtained by JAXA PCG #13 contribute to the development of drugs for multidrug-resistant bacteria, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy and periodontitis. They will also aid in the development of a blood substitute and biosensor.

Advanced Nano Step Microgravity Measurements Apparatus (MMA) Cable Connection: After successfully adjusting the position of the cell stage to resolve movement issues during sample observations last week; today the MMA cable connection to the medical laptop was completed to measure MMA data during the Advanced Nano Step experiment run.  JAXA’s Advanced Nano Step experiment investigates the relationship between impurity incorporation mechanisms and the quality of obtained protein crystals should be clarified for the progress to an “advanced” stage of the space utilization for structure-based drug design. In this mission, we observe the protein crystal growth surfaces of glucose isomerase crystals in space in the presence of various impurities with the use of a Michelson interferometer. In addition, we also clarify the crystal surface morphology on the molecular step level by using the laser confocal microscope. We evaluate the crystal quality of the returned crystals.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 30 urine sample collections that began yesterday and blood sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A 51S crewmember completed a Flight Day 80 FMS session, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew configured tools, reviewed EVA procedures, and conducted a conference with ground specialists in preparation for next week’s EVA. The goals of USOS EVA #46 include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the degraded CP13 camera and R&R of the Latching End Effector (LEE) A Camera Lens Assembly (CLA).

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #68 on: 10/18/2017 08:31 AM »
RPCM R&R still going on ...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #69 on: 10/18/2017 03:31 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/17/2017

Posted on October 17, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  Today crewmembers set up cameras in Node 3 to capture video from multiple views of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and MED-2 hardware.  They also applied body markers, and performed exercises before transferring the video for downlink.  The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Hardware Configuration: The crew continued to conduct the LMM configuration activities that began last week, by removing the Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) control box and LMM Monochrome camera, before installing the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) high rate data link, the LMM confocal unit and brackets, and the LMM confocal and wide-field cameras. The LMM hardware configuration will support upcoming ACE-T6 operations. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Meteor Grating Configuration: The crew removed and replaced gratings in the Meteor camera located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) payload volume. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.   

TangoLab-2 Card Troubleshooting: In August, during installation of a payload card into the TangoLab-2 slot, the card did not seat properly.  Today as part of the troubleshooting efforts, the crew took a different payload card from TangoLab-1 and then installed it into the slot in TangoLab-2. The crew photographed the inside of TangoLab-2 specifically where connectors are located for downlink.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew photo-documented the status of the plants in the Veggie facility. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and Mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and Mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew setup and configured the RED camera in the Cupola to capture video footage of New York City and the Nile Delta. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew set up cameras and reviewed robotics procedures/tools in preparation for this Friday’s EVA. The goals of USOS EVA #46 include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the Latching End Effector (LEE) A Camera Lens Assembly (CLA).

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B-B R&R:  Today, robotics ground controllers removed a degraded RPCM from external slot P12B-B and attempted to replace it with a functional unit from P13A-G. The installation of the new RPCM into P12B_B slot was unsuccessful this morning. Ground teams have backed off to a park position. Teams are discussing a forward plan. This RPC provides power to the S-band String 2 Transponder.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #70 on: 10/18/2017 03:31 PM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/920622736988241920
Quote
The RPCM swap is complete! Lots more robotics ops this week: next up stowing #Dextre and setting up for Friday's EVA

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #71 on: 10/19/2017 07:46 AM »
https://twitter.com/Kam_Bahrami/status/920764770927734784
Quote
One of @csa_asc most experienced flight controllers Deana S. is stowing #Dextre on MBS & getting #Canadarm2 repositioned for my ops 2morow!

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #72 on: 10/19/2017 02:48 PM »
October 19, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-124

Georgia Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station


Students at New Prospect Elementary School in Alpharetta, Georgia, will speak with the NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 10:50 a.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 23. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Twenty Georgia elementary school students will be invited to ask Randy Bresnik, Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei questions about living in space aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, or any other topic that interests the students.

This is the second mission to the International Space Station for Expedition 53 commander Bresnik, who launched to the space station on July 28 and is scheduled to return to Earth in December. Acaba and Vande Hei arrived at the space station Sept. 12. It’s the third mission to space for Acaba and the first for Vande Hei.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Donna Lowry or Susan Hale at

470-254-6830 or via email communications@fultonschools.org. New Prospect Elementary School is at 3055 Kimball Bridge Road in Alpharetta.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/education/onstation

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #73 on: 10/20/2017 02:49 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/19/2017

Posted on October 19, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Circadian Rhythms:  Yesterday a crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab Double Sensors and mounted the Thermolab Unit to their belt, which began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember completed a Flight Day 85 FMS session which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trends/varies before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew conducted a review of EVA procedures and a conference with ground teams.  They also inspected tethers, configured tools, printed cuff checklists, and prepared the equipment lock in preparation for tomorrow’s EVA. The goals of USOS EVA #46 include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the Latching End Effector (LEE) A Camera Lens Assembly (CLA).

Tablet Updates:  As part of the ongoing efforts to update the operating system on the onboard tablets, the crew performed steps to update and configure those tablets.

Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) P12B-B R&R:  Wednesday morning, ground teams completed the robotic activities to swap RPCM P12B-B with P13A-G.  On Monday night RPCM P12B-B was extracted and installed into empty truss slot P11A-D and the replacement RPCM was removed from slot P13A-G, however it could not be inserted into the P12B-B at that time.  Robotics activities resumed on Tuesday afternoon and teams were able to successfully install the replacement RPCM in the P12B-B slot after 47 wiggle and push attempts.  The new P12B-B RPCM powered up nominally.  Ground teams then removed the failed RPCM from the P11A-D truss slot and relocated it to the P13A-B slot successfully.  The power up of the P13A-G RPCM was also performed nominally.  This completes the RPCM swap activities.

JEM Airlock (A/L) Reconfiguration:  Today, the crew removed the MBSU from the JEM A/L where it had been stowed after the I-Level maintenance was performed in early September.  The Kaber plate and adapter plate were then installed on the A/L slide table in preparation for installation of the KE2M satellite on Monday.  After KE2M and SIMPL, another JEM A/L-deployed satellite, are deployed next week, the MBSU will be returned to the JEM A/L for transfer and installation externally at External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP2).

External Robotics Operations:  Overnight, robotics ground controllers stowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and configured the SSRMS to be in position for the EVA tomorrow.  The SSRMS is now based on LEE B, at Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 4 (PDGF), Worksite 6. LEE A is ready to receive a new LEE CLA.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #74 on: 10/20/2017 10:16 PM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/921437019171164160
Quote
More ops tonight! Post EVA we Walkoff, unstow #Dextre and setup for a survey of NICER.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #75 on: 10/21/2017 09:58 AM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/921604132280176640
Quote
#dextre unstow and NICER survey complete.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #76 on: 10/21/2017 12:08 PM »
October 20, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-125

International Space Station Crew Invites Public Along for Photographic Trip Around World

NASA astronaut and Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik will spend one full orbit photographing Earth from the International Space Station on Monday, Oct. 23, and he is inviting people around the globe to share images from their Earth-side vantage point on social media.

Bresnik, with help from fellow astronaut Joe Acaba, will begin the “photo frenzy” from the station’s 360-degree Earth-facing cupola window beginning at 8:25 a.m. EDT. Traveling at about five miles per second, the station completes one orbit around Earth approximately every 90 minutes.

As part of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, an initiative to inspire more students and teachers than ever before during the 2017-18 school year, students located in areas Bresnik will photograph are especially invited to join him on the journey and share their photos, including their locations and names of their schools.

“You can’t look at the Earth and not be changed,” Bresnik said. “You realize every experience you’ve ever had and every person you’ve ever known is down on that little blue marble.”

The station’s orbit will begin with a sweep from the United Kingdom across central Europe to Oman, a pass near the Maldives, sunset west of Australia and sunrise over the south Pacific Ocean before concluding with a pass over North America from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, to Montreal, Canada. Bresnik will be posting updates of his views on his social media accounts throughout, as satellite communications coverage allows.

Regardless of where you’ll be on Earth during their photo session, the astronauts are asking for your help to capture this moment in time, specifically from 8:25-9:55 a.m. EDT (12:25-13:55 GMT). They’re encouraging educators, students, and the public to post a picture to social media of their surroundings from their unique vantage point using the hashtag #1World1Orbit.

Astronaut photography documents how the planet changes over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. In addition to research applications, photography is a favorite pastime of the crew, and many astronauts feel compelled to share their cosmic perspective with humanity with humanity on social media.

There are opportunities for humanity to stay in touch with our representatives off the planet every day. You can track the station and sighting opportunities in your area anytime with NASA’s Spot the Station tool.

Another Earth observation from station opportunity is Sally Ride EarthKAM, which begins its next mission on Nov. 1, and allows student groups to track and analyze sections of the planet over time.

Follow Bresnik on social media at:

https://www.facebook.com/AstroKomrade/

https://twitter.com/AstroKomrade

https://www.instagram.com/astrokomrade

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #77 on: 10/23/2017 02:07 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/20/2017

Posted on October 20, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46:  Randy Bresnik (as EV1) and Joe Acaba (as EV2) successfully performed US EVA #46 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6 hrs 49 min. The primary goals of the EVA were to Remove and Replace (R&R) a fuse in the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP), install an External High Definition Camera (EHDC) at the Camera Port 3 (CP3) location, and install a new Camera/Light Assembly (CLA) on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector A (LEE A). The crew also removed Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) from an Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) and tied down an MLI Skirt on a spare Direct Current Switching Unit (DCSU). The crew also performed the following get ahead tasks: Lubrication of the LEE A Linear Bearings, Prep of two Pump Modules (PMs) by removing the MLI straps and tape used for launch loads, and T-Handle installation on the Port Radiator Grapple Bar (RGB).

Circadian Rhythms: The 51S crewmember removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36 hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Wednesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Space Headaches:  Today a 51S crewmember completed a weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #78 on: 10/24/2017 07:29 AM »
https://twitter.com/Kam_Bahrami/status/922709905315975168
Quote
... we moved #Canadarm2 & #Dextre in position to fire KE2M off into space!

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #79 on: 10/24/2017 08:52 AM »
https://twitter.com/Kam_Bahrami/status/922709905315975168
Quote
... we moved #Canadarm2 & #Dextre in position to fire KE2M off into space!

Offline centaurinasa

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« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 04:18 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #81 on: 10/24/2017 09:28 AM »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #82 on: 10/24/2017 09:40 AM »
Sunrise and ready to deploy
« Last Edit: 10/24/2017 09:43 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #83 on: 10/24/2017 09:54 AM »
« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 06:54 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #84 on: 10/24/2017 10:11 AM »
Meanwile, Randy is working in Quest airlock...
« Last Edit: 10/24/2017 10:35 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #85 on: 10/24/2017 10:15 AM »
MetOx canister...

Offline centaurinasa

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« Last Edit: 10/24/2017 10:29 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #87 on: 10/24/2017 11:06 AM »
LCG "Liquid Cooling Garment"
« Last Edit: 10/24/2017 11:08 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #88 on: 10/24/2017 02:14 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/23/2017

Posted on October 23, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lighting Effects:  A 51S crewmember conducted a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The completed tests were photographed and downlinked. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Astronaut Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today a 51S crewmember initiated Day 0 activities to support the Energy investigation. The subject donned an armband monitor, set up the Pulmonary Function System (PFS) hardware, and began eating a controlled diet. For this part of the investigation, additionally, a control subject participated, with both crewmembers collecting urine samples at approximately the same time over the next 11 days (Day 0 through Day 10). The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from the Russian crewmembers, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the Radi-N experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation will be conducted by measuring neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 30 urine and blood sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

NanoRacks Kestrel Eye Satellite Preparation and Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) Installation: Using the maintenance work area (MWA), the crew prepared the Kestrel Eye satellite for deployment by attaching the satellite to the Kaber, and on the JEM Airlock slide table, the crew attached the Kaber to the JEM CLPA Adapter Plate (JCAP). Following the Kestrel Eye satellite installation, the crew took measurements to ensure that the hardware was within tolerance of the JEM A/L deployment envelope.  The measurements exceeded the tolerances by a small amount, so ground teams are discussing a forward plan.  A decision is expected later this evening.  In the meantime, the slide table was retracted in manual mode and the inner hatch was closed. The JEM A/L has been depressurized.  NanoRacks-SMDC-Kestrel Eye IIM (NanoRacks-KE IIM) is a microsatellite carrying an optical imaging system payload, including a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) telescope. The investigation validates the concept of using microsatellites in low-Earth orbit to support critical operations. An overall goal is to demonstrate that small satellites are viable platforms for providing critical path support to operations and hosting advanced payloads.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R): Today the crew performed an R&R of the WHC urine receptacle and insert filter. Following the R&R a successful WHC functionality test was performed.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Operations:  On Saturday, Robotic Ground Controllers walked the SSRMS onto the Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 1 (PDGF1). They then maneuvered the SSRMS to unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from MBS PDGF2. On Sunday, the SSRMS maneuvered to support a survey of the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) and Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) using the SPDM Camera Light Pan/Tilt Unit (PTU) Assemblies (CLPAs).  Finally, the Mobile Transporter (MT) was translated from Worksite 2 (WS2) to WS7 and the SPDM and SSRMS were configured for the start of the Kaber / Kestral Eye 2M deploy.

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #89 on: 10/25/2017 02:30 PM »
Freon leak during an assembly of SIMPL satellite?

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #90 on: 10/25/2017 03:33 PM »
Servicing EMUs again today...
From ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/23/2017:
"Wednesday, 10/25: ... EMU Water Dump and Fill"
« Last Edit: 10/25/2017 06:19 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #91 on: 10/25/2017 06:15 PM »
Freon leak during an assembly of SIMPL satellite?
Apparently, Joe is working on it, right now...


Online Chris Bergin

Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #93 on: 10/26/2017 01:03 PM »
Comms are bad, but here they go!

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #94 on: 10/26/2017 04:12 PM »
Many "people" in Destiny Lab, right now...
(possibly: "Thursday, 10/26: OBT Emergency Simulation", ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/25/2017 )
« Last Edit: 10/26/2017 04:16 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #95 on: 10/27/2017 06:18 AM »
October 26, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-127

California Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students at Santa Monica High School in Santa Monica, California, will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:50 a.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 30. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will interact with NASA astronauts Randy Bresnik and Joe Acaba who are aboard the International Space Station on Expedition 53. Each homeroom in the school submitted questions to the astronauts. Discussion will include topics about living aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and science in space.

This is Bresnik’s second mission to the station. He currently is serving as Expedition 53 commander after launching to the station on July 28. He’s scheduled to return to Earth in December. Acaba arrived at the space station Sept. 12, beginning his third space mission and will return to Earth in February 2018.

Bresnik graduated from Santa Monica High School in 1985. Jonny Kim, a recently announced member of the astronaut candidate class of 2017, also graduated from Santa Monica High School in 2002.

Four Santa Monica High School students recently flew an experiment onboard the space station as part of the Student Space Flight Experiments Program (SSEP) Mission 11. The experiment, “The Effect of Microgravity on the Rate of Fermentation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae,” studies whether microgravity on the space station affects the quantity of ethanol produced from yeast fermentation.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Gail Pinsker via email at gpinsker@smmusd.org. Santa Monica High School is at 601 Pico Boulevard in Santa Monica.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/
« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 06:18 AM by jacqmans »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #96 on: 10/27/2017 06:20 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/24/2017
 
Extravehicular Mobility Unit Loop Scrub:  Today, the crew configured Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suits 3003 and 3008 for loop scrubbing.  Once the scrubbing activity was complete, they reconfigured hardware and performed iodination of Ion Filters for both suits. A sample of the water was obtained after the loop scrub activity to determine the effectiveness of the filtering.  A small portion of this water sample will be used for a conductivity test onboard ISS and the remaining water will be sent to the ground for chemical analysis.

Kestrel Eye (KE2M) Satellite Deployment: Overnight, robotics ground controllers opened the external hatch of the JEM A/L and extended the slide table to send the Kestrel Eye satellite outside of the ISS.  Then, using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), they picked up the KE2M satellite, positioned it for deployment, and then deployed the satellite.  During deployment, the crew captured still and video imagery from the cupola windows.  NanoRacks-SMDC-Kestrel Eye IIM (NanoRacks-KE IIM) is a microsatellite carrying an optical imaging system payload, including a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) telescope. The investigation validates the concept of using microsatellites in low-Earth orbit to support critical operations. An overall goal is to demonstrate that small satellites are viable platforms for providing critical path support to operations and hosting advanced payloads.

Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): After initiating the 11 day diet yesterday, today the subject began Day 1 of operations for the Energy investigation. The subject conducted a series of urine collections, configured the Pulmonary Function System (PFS), and performed a series of four 50-minute Oxygen Uptake Measurements (OUMs) after consuming prescribed meals. The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs

Two Phase Flow Troubleshooting:  The crew installed the Two Phase Flow experiment equipment to the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Work Volume (WV) and the Small Experiment Area (SEA) to troubleshoot a heat loss issue. The Two Phase Flow investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew setup and configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained the Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 52S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 30 urine sample collections that began yesterday to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL) Units 2 and 3 Incubator Installations: Today the crew installed CO2 incubator controllers into SABL Units 2 and 3. These two SABL units will serve as replacements for the failed SABL units that were returned on SpaceX-12 last month. SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has a temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew setup and configured the RED camera to capture video footage of Italy and Ireland to Russia. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #97 on: 10/27/2017 06:20 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/25/2017
 

Node 3 Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Photos:  This morning, the crew removed the WHC Kabin, took photographs of surrounding areas, and then replaced the WHC Kabin. These high-resolution, high-quality photos of seat track locations in the vicinity of the WHC and Node 3 Mid-Bay will be analyzed by teams on the ground.  These analyses are needed for the design of the Double Stall enclosure attach points for the new Toilet System launching in 2019.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Maintenance: The crew performed a half water dump and refill on EMU 3006 feedwater tanks and a full water dump and refill of EMUs 3003 and 3010 feeedwater tanks. These activities satisfy maintenance requirements for on-orbit stowage.

Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today the subject performed day 2 of the 11-day Energy investigation, by collecting ISS water samples from the Potable Water Dispenser, continuing with urine collection, and stowing the deployed Pulmonary Function System (PFS) equipment. Throughout the day, the crew logged their food and drink consumptions as well. The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Zero Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Valve Open & Close: The crew opened GN2 valves to allow the Fluid Reservoir to push fluid to the Test Section to change the fill level. Additional testing will be performed at the new fill level. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Satlet Initial Mission Proofs and Lessons (SIMPL) Operations:  SIMPL is a satellite transferred through the JEM airlock, maneuvered via the SPDM/SSRMS, and released via the “Kaber” Micro Satellite Deployer. The crew reconfigured Kaber on the JEM airlock in preparation for SIMPL by removing the remaining components related to the previous KE2M satellite and the Slide Table Extension Plate. Then Kaber/Adapter Plate (JCAP) were reinstalled to the slide table. During the SIMPL assembly, a small quantity of the Freon was released from one of the SIMPL “Satlets” and the crew stood down so that teams could determine a forward plan. Ground teams determined that the Freon is toxicity level zero and poses no threat to the crew, so assembly of SIMPL resumed. Following the installation of the SIMPL to Kaber on the JEM airlock slide table, the slide table was retracted into the airlock and the inner hatch closed in preparation for depressurization of the airlock and deployment of the satellite.

Manufacturing Device (MD) Operations: The crew replaced the MD feedstock canister. The Manufacturing Device – Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) enables the production of components on the ISS for both NASA and commercial objectives. Parts, entire experiments, and tools can be created on demand utilizing the AMF that is installed into an Express Rack locker location. The AMF is capable of producing parts out of a wide variety of thermopolymers including engineered plastics.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #98 on: 10/27/2017 09:30 AM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/923843625926184961
Quote
Our second #Kaber deployment this week is complete - #SIMPL #MicroSat released into orbit from #ISS at 09:15:23 GMT!
If my count is correct, it was the 200th satellite, deployed via the JEM-Airlock.
« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 09:37 AM by Olaf »

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #99 on: 10/27/2017 12:23 PM »
If my count is correct, it was the 200th satellite, deployed via the JEM-Airlock

Yes.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #100 on: 10/27/2017 04:21 PM »
« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 04:24 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #101 on: 10/27/2017 06:50 PM »
Arm in move, right now....
« Last Edit: 10/27/2017 07:07 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #102 on: 10/28/2017 05:10 PM »
If my count is correct, it was the 200th satellite, deployed via the JEM-Airlock

Yes

Statistics.
212 satellites deployed from ISS, including:
- 9 satellites deployed during Russian spacewalks;
- 203 satellites deployed from Kibo airlock, including:
-- 201 satellites deployed by JEM RMS, including:
--- 27 satellites deployed using JSSOD, including 2 satellites separated later from deployed satellites;
--- 171 satellites deployed using NRCSD;
--- 3 satellites deployed using SSIKLOPS, including 1 satellite separated later from deployed satellite.
-- 2 satellites deployed by SSRMS using Kaber.
« Last Edit: 10/28/2017 05:46 PM by anik »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #103 on: 10/30/2017 01:15 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/26/2017
 

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Depress: The crew has depressurized the JEM A/L and vented the remaining air in preparation for the deployment of Satlet Initial Mission Proofs and Lessons (SIMPL) early Friday morning.

Personal Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Monitor Installations: After reviewing reference material, the crew completed software and hardware installation activities by configuring the iPad applications, recalibrating 3 Personal CO2 Monitors and installing them near the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) intake located in the LAB. The sensors were synced with the 3 iPads, which will remain near the monitors. The Personal CO2 Monitor demonstrates a system capable of unobtrusively collecting and downlinking individual crew members’ CO2 exposure for weeks to months. This investigation evaluates wearability principles in microgravity and also demonstrates the Modular Wearable Architecture Base Board, allowing rapid certification of future wearable devices.

Fluidics:  The crew began the first of a two day Fluidics experiment run. Today’s operations included the hardware installation in the Columbus module and the start of the first science run. Fluidics will remain deployed tonight but it will be powered off.  Fluidics is a fluid mechanics experiment with two main objectives: a Slosh Study to investigate fluid behavior under microgravity during satellite maneuvers, and a Wave Turbulence Study to investigate the impact of capillary effect on wave turbulence without being masked by the effect of gravity. Two tanks with different filling rations (50% and 75%) for Slosh and one tank with water for Wave Turbulence will be used.

Plant Habitat Overview and Hardware Gather: The crew reviewed Plant Habitat assembly reference material and gathered hardware to support upcoming facility installation activities. The Advanced Plant Habitat Facility (Plant Habitat) is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today the subject performed Day 3 activities of the 11-day Energy investigation by logging his food and drink consumptions throughout the day. The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 90 FMS session which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

ISS Emergency Drill:  All six crewmembers participated in an ISS emergency drill and debrief.  The crew used an onboard simulator to guide their responses during two separate simulations. The purpose of this training is to practice ISS emergency responses based on information provided by the simulator. The crew physically translates through ISS to appropriate locations in order to visualize the use of station equipment and interfaces. They also practice procedure execution and associated decision making, all while exercising communication skills with MCC-H and MCC-M.

Ocular Ultrasounds:  Today the crew assisted each other in performing routine medical eye imaging ultrasound.  The ultrasound images will be used to identify changes in globe morphology and document optic nerve sheath diameter, optic nerve sheath tortuosity, globe axial measurements, and choroidal engorgement.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #104 on: 10/30/2017 01:16 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/27/2017
 

Satlet Initial Mission Proofs and Lessons (SIMPL) Deployment: Following the depressurization of the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) yesterday, today ground controllers opened the outer hatch of the JEMAL and extended the slide table holding SIMPL.  Then the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) with the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) grappled and removed the Kaber with the SIMPL from the JEMAL and positioned it for release.  SIMPL was successfully deployed into its own orbit at 0915 GMT to complete its science mission as a free-flying satellite.  The Kaber was returned to the JEMAL.

Veg-03 Consumption Harvest #1: The crew harvested and ate several of the larger leaves from each plant. The remainder of the plants will be left to grow and sprout new leaves. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

Plant Habitat Installation: Today the crew conducted a series of four assembly and installation activities for the Plant Habitat facility into the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 5 (ER5).  Next week, the crew will move the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Sensor Enclosure from the European Drawer Rack to ER5. The Advanced Plant Habitat Facility (Plant Habitat) is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.  The associated Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Sensor Enclosure (SE) installation was deferred when the other activities ran long.  It will be re-scheduled later.

Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today the subject performed day 4 of the 11-day Energy investigation, by taking ISS tap water samples from the Potable Water Dispenser and conducting urine sample collections. Throughout the day, the crew continued to log their food and drink consumptions as well. The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Fluidics:  Today is the second and final day of the Fluidics experiment run, which includes the 2nd and 3rd science runs and two bonus test sequences. The first bonus test sequence was conducted prior to the start of the 2nd science run, and the second bonus test sequence was conducted after the 3rd science run. Fluidics is a fluid mechanics experiment with two main objectives: a Slosh Study to investigate fluid behavior under microgravity during satellite maneuvers, and a Wave Turbulence Study to investigate the impact of capillary effect on wave turbulence without being masked by the effect of gravity. Two tanks with different filling rations (50% and 75%) for Slosh and one tank with water for Wave Turbulence will be used. 

Story Time from Space: A crewmember participated in the Story Time from Space investigation by reading “Starry Messenger” on camera. The video recordings will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

51 Soyuz (51S) Emergency Egress Drill: The 51S crew participated in an emergency descent drill. This training session focuses on off-nominal procedures that would be used in the event the crew needs to egress the ISS and perform an emergency descent. The drill is scheduled when the crew has been aboard the ISS for 12-14 weeks, then once every 2.5 months.

Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Tank Bag Relabel:  The crew relabeled NORS Tank bags numbers.  The number currently on the bags do not correspond to the serial number of the Recharge Tank Bag nor the Recharge Tank contained within, and has misled crew to attempt installation of an incorrect tank.  This task will prevent confusion in the future.

Backup Commercial off the Shelf Ultra High Frequency Communications Unit Removal (CUCU) Removal: Today the backup CUCU was removed and permanently stowed to make room in the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack for a payload arriving on SpaceX-14 (SpX-14).

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #105 on: 10/30/2017 07:14 PM »
For example this can be done with the ISS Topo Excel file.

Image that goes along with the ISS Daily summery of 10/27/2017

Online Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #106 on: 10/31/2017 04:21 AM »
https://www.facebook.com/AstroKomrade/photos/a.230802070674289.1073741828.221702661584230/362257864195375/?type=3&theater

We can’t have sharp objects up here on International Space Station, so Space Wolverine played by Mark T. Vande Hei has spoons that come out of his hands!
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #107 on: 11/01/2017 08:05 AM »
Most likely this was already posted, but I couldn't find the link here: Expedition 53 summery
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/exp-53-summary.pdf

Is the Optic Fiber production experiment called PIM?

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #108 on: 11/01/2017 12:23 PM »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/10/30
Quote
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/30/2017

Astronaut Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Over the weekend a 51S crewmember completed day 5 and 6 activities of the 11-day Energy experiment run. Today the subject performed day 7 activities by logging their food and drink consumptions throughout the day. The Energy investigation is conducted over an 11 day period (day 0 through day 10) and measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Plant Habitat Installation: Following last week’s successful assembly and installation of the Plant Habitat facility into the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 5 (ER5), today the crew moved the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Sensor Enclosure (SE) from the European Drawer Rack to ER5. The Advanced Plant Habitat Facility (Plant Habitat) is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember conducted a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Color Discrimination Test. After the test was completed, the crewmember setup the Actiwatch hardware to prepare for a two week long sleep study session, which will track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The sleep study session begins tomorrow. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Setup and Activation: The crew set up the payload components for EarthKAM in Node 2 for a week-long imaging session. Sally Ride EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval:  Today a USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment and handed them to a Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Manufacturing Device (MD) Operations: The crew removed, inspected, and reinstalled the MD feedstock canister, and replaced the extruder head. The Manufacturing Device – Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) enables the production of components on the ISS for both NASA and commercial objectives. Parts, entire experiments, and tools can be created on demand utilizing the AMF that is installed into an Express Rack locker location. The AMF is capable of producing parts out of a wide variety of thermopolymers including engineered plastics.

Meteor Hard Drive R&R: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.   

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEM A/L) Activities:  The JEM A/L slide table was extended into the JEM Pressurized Module (JEM PM).  Kaber was removed from the Airlock adapter plates, caps were installed and the hardware was stowed.  The JEM A/L adapter plate was then removed from the JEM A/L slide table and the JEM Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Transfer Interface (JOTI) was installed.  The Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) spare was installed on the JOTI and the slide table was retracted into the airlock.  The MBSU will be transferred to External Stowage Platform (ESP) 2 on November 4th.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit Loop Scrub:  The crew configured Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suits 3006 and 3010 for loop scrubbing.  Once the scrubbing activity was complete, they reconfigured hardware and performed iodination of ion filters for both suits. A sample of the water was obtained after the loop scrub activity to determine the effectiveness of the filtering.  A small portion of this water sample will be used for a conductivity test onboard ISS and the remaining water will be sent to the ground for chemical analysis.

Crew Quarters (CQs) Airflow Measurements:  The crew took airflow measurements in all four CQs using the velocicalc tool.  Measurements were taken at the exhaust outlet and inlet vents, intake inlet vent and head region at three different fan speeds.

Lab Umbilical Interface Panel Reconfiguration:  The crew reinstalled the necessary power harness and potable water connectors on the Lab1P1 Z-panel.  These connectors are required for use by the European Space Agency (ESA) Life Support Rack to be delivered on H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7.
...
Three-Day Look Ahead:

Tuesday, 10/31: JEM Stowage, MMD, ASTROBEE JPM Map, N2 Fwd IMV Mod prep, INSITU, FSL maintenance, EIISS Target Ops, ELF Cartridge Clean, Microbial Tracking, N1 IMV Jumper Install, Storytime, PEPs Inspect
Wednesday, 11/01: N2 Fwd IMV Reconfig, P/RV SAW Mast Survey, EIISS Target Ops, ER8 iPEHG Install
Thursday, 11/02: A/L PHA QD, Energy, COL WOOV8 Inspect, Miniature Exercise Device ARED, Lab Rack Swap, Hatch Seal Inspect, Storytime 

So the 30th they:
- removed Kaber from the JEM Airlock; and placed JOTI/MBSU back.
- They reconfigured Lab P1 (robonaut rests here) for ACLS that will launch on HTV-7.
- They did a audit of PMM S4 rack (most likely checking what is inside there).
- EarthKAM setup & activation in Node 2

Tuesday 31th they plan to:
- dod something inside JEM stowage (inventory analysis?)
- Mapping JPM (KIBO lab) with ASTROBEE
- Preparations for N2 Forward IMV modifications (Cables for IDA; crew docking port(s)?) [Wednesday activity]
- N(ode)1 IMV (InterModule Ventilation) jumper install
- FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory LAB S3COL O1) Maintainance
- ELF (Electronic Levitating Furnace) Cartridge Clean.

Wednesday they plan to:
- Do the Node 2 Forward cable reconfiguration (IMV Reconfig)
- Express rack 8 iPEHG installation (Improved Payload Ethernet Hub Gateway)

Thursday:
- Airlock PHA QD ??? (... Quick Disconnect)
- COLumbus WOOV8 inspect (??)
- Miniature Exercise Device activity on ARED.
- Lab Rack Swap  :o !! Racks are going to be moved!!
- Hatch Seal Inspection (maintenance activity)
 
Sorry, off topic:
So this confirms that the ACLS-rack will launch onboard HTV-7.
I also stumbled across this NASA Stakeholders conference page, these papers confirm that:
- LSG (Glovebox)-rack will also launch on HTV-7.
- Additional (basic) express racks will go to the ISS
- Before 2018 the following external US payloads will launch: TSIS, SDS, RRM-3 & MISSE-FF
(most likely SpX-13 and 14 payloads. AFAIK there is room for one or two more external payloads)

USOS is going to operate with 4 crew members, because Russia decreases from 3 to 2.
This will double the crew time for scientific activities (This fact is most likely the reason why this crew member could become a commercial (payed) crew member.
« Last Edit: 11/01/2017 09:58 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #109 on: 11/01/2017 09:48 PM »
And the next one: https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/10/
Quote
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/31/2017

Microbial Tracking-2:  The crew collected body and saliva samples in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation today. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. The crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

ISS Non-invasive Sample Investigation and results Transmission to ground with the Utmost easiness (In Situ):  The crew collected a saliva sample and processed it in the bioanalyzer for the In Situ investigation.  Crewmembers are continuously monitored for health changes, and as part of these measurements, they have to take saliva samples that are stored and returned to Earth later. The IN SITU bioanalysis is a portable device that can check crewmembers’ saliva on board, enabling direct real-time analysis. The device’s first uses are to monitor stress levels and appetites among crewmembers. Humans living in space experience dramatic changes to their health, from weakened bone and muscle to reduced appetites and increased stress levels. The device uses disposable cartridges that check for the presence of the stress hormone cortisol.  A miniature analytical device that can detect certain biomarkers using non-invasively collected samples would benefit health care workers on Earth, from emergency medical technicians on call, to small rural clinics in developing countries.

Astronaut Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today the subject conducted day 8 of the 11 day Energy experiment run by logging their food and drink consumptions throughout the day. The Energy investigation is conducted over an 11 day period (day 0 through day 10) and measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember began a two week long Sleep Shift session by tracking his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Fluids Science Laboratory (FSL): The crew configured the FSL by releasing the Facility Core Element (FCE) to allow it to free float within the FSL rack. This configuration is required to support upcoming microgravity sensitive experiments. The Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) is a multiuser facility designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for conducting fluid physics research in microgravity. It can be operated as a fully automatic or semiautomatic facility and can be controlled onboard by the International Space Station (ISS) crew or from the ground in telescience mode.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) Operations:  To prepare for upcoming ELF experiments, the crew exchanged the ELF sample holder and cleaned the cartridge. The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by container less processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Story Time from Space: A crewmember participated in the Story Time from Space investigation by reading “Max Goes to the Space Station” on camera. The video recordings will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEM A/L) Depressurization:  The JEM A/L has been depressurized in order to complete the transfer of the Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) spare, which was installed in the JEM A/L yesterday.  The MBSU will be transferred to External Stowage Platform (ESP) 2 on November 4th.

Mobile Transporter (MT) translation:  Tonight, ground teams will translate the MT from worksite 3 in preparation for MBSU operations later this week.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Stowage Consolidation for SpX-13:  Today, the crew performed stowage consolidation in order to make space for cargo arriving on Spx-13.

Node 1 Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Jumper Installation:  The crew installed a jumper to the Node 1 Aft Port IMV Valve in order to correct reversed pin-outs due to Node 1 Galley modifications. Checkout of the IMV Valve was successful.

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPS) Inspection: The crew performed this regularly scheduled maintenance to inspect Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBAs) and Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs).

Offline bolun

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #110 on: 11/02/2017 11:31 AM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #111 on: 11/03/2017 08:46 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/01/2017
 

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Lens Change: The crew configured the D2X camera for EarthKAM with the 180mm lens. EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

Astronaut Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): The 51S subject conducted day 9 of the 11-day Energy experiment run, by logging their food and drink consumptions throughout the day. The Energy investigation is conducted over an 11 day period (day 0 through day 10) and measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember completed the 2nd day of a two week long Sleep Shifted session, by tracking his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

At Home in Space:  The crew took photographs today to document ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

67 Progress (67P) Reboost:  Tonight, ground teams will reboost the station using thrusters on 67P.  Duration is targeted for 03:26, with a target delta V of 0.42 m/s.

Node 2 Forward Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration:  Today the crew installed a new IMV Fan and Silencer Assembly at Node 2 Forward Deck Endcone. They did not get to the tasks to install ducting to provide IMV flow into PMA-2 in preparation for future Visiting Vehicle dockings or to install a new IMV Grille Screen to provide easier cleaning of the Node 2 Overhead Port Alcove IMV Inlet.  These tasks will be scheduled at a later date.

Improved Payload Ethernet Hub Gateway (iPEHG):  The crew installed an iPEHG in Express Rack (ER) 8. The new iPEHG design corrects performance limitations often experienced by the older PEHGs.

Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Rack Front Cleanup:  The crew prepared the PMM Rack Fronts to accept cargo during the upcoming Orbital ATK 8 (OA-8) mission by moving smaller items off of rack fronts and staging these items for disposal. During OA-8 cargo operations, these disposal items will be swapped with cargo that arrived on OA-8.

Mobile Serving System (MSS) Operations: Robotic Ground Controllers powered off the MSS and translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 7 (WS7) to WS3.  After MSS was powered back on, they then configured MSS for the start of Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) preparation operations scheduled to start tomorrow.  They finally performed a checkout of the Backup Drive unit (BDU).  MSS performance was nominal.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #112 on: 11/03/2017 01:22 PM »
An unusual view of the truss...

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #113 on: 11/04/2017 03:09 AM »
NASA Astronaut Randy "Komrade" Bresnik
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Super Space Sammy: beef patty with spaghetti with a hint of mustard on a flying saucer tortilla. #NationalSandwichDay on the International Space Station — with International Space Station.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #114 on: 11/04/2017 09:25 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/02/2017
 

Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight (Energy): Today the subject performed day 10, which is the last day of the 11-day (Day 0 through Day 10) Energy investigation, by collecting ISS tap water samples form the Potable Water Dispenser, collecting a urine sample, and downlinking the data from the sense wear activity monitor. The Energy investigation measures an Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight, a crucial factor needed for sending the correct amount of the right types of food with space crews. Nine astronauts will be examined during exercise and rest cycles three months before launch, three months after arriving at space station and adapting to the space environment, and after return to Earth. Physicians will measure metabolic rates, urine content, and bone density to determine energy needs.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  Today crewmembers set up cameras in Node 3 and captured video from multiple views of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and MED-2 hardware, applied body markers, performed exercises and transferred the video for downlink.  The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equi pment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Microbial Tracking-2:  A 52S crewmember collected saliva samples in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation today.  The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Fluids Science Laboratory (FSL): To test the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Subsystem (MVIS) the crew released the Facility Core Element (FCE) to allow it to free float within the FSL rack. This configuration is required to support upcoming microgravity sensitive experiments.  The Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) is a multiuser facility designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for conducting fluid physics research in microgravity. It can be operated as a fully automatic or semiautomatic facility and can be controlled onboard by the International Space Station (ISS) crew or from the ground in telescience mode.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember completed a Sleep Shift session by tracking his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Story Time From Space: A crewmember participated in the Story Time from Space investigation by reading “Notable Notebooks Scientists and Their Writings Read” on camera. The video recordings will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Prebreathe Hose Assembly (PHA) Quick Disconnect 26 (QD26) Repair:  Today the crew removed, aligned, and installed PHA QD26 to the mounting bracket in the Airlock. PHA QD26 was misaligned during corrective maintenance in 2009.  During this activity the crew removed PHA QD26 from the mounting bracket and inspected the Gamah Seal.  After inspection, it was determined that this seal did not need replacement.  Finally, they aligned the PHA QD and torqued it while attached to the mounting bracket.

Rack Swap in US Lab:  The crew swapped the Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR) in the LAB1O5 location with the Crew Health Care System (CheCS) Rack in the LAB1D4 location.  This swap was in preparation for a new Water Storage System (WSS) to be built into the ZSR later next year.  During the swap, the CheCS Rack needed to be temporarily moved to Node 1.  A Hatch Seal inspection was performed for the Node 1 Forward and the Lab Aft hatches following the transfer the activities. The Hatch Seal inspections are required to verify no damage following the transfer of the CHeCS rack through these hatches to perform the rack swap.

Columbus Water On-Off Valve 8 (WOOV8) Troubleshooting:  The crew rotated the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 3 (ER3) in Columbus and temporarily installed a Test Connector for troubleshooting the status indication provided by the position sensor of the WOOV8.  Following the troubleshooting, it was determined that the incorrect status indication was due to a faulty sensor internal to WOOV8.

67 Progress (67P) Reboost:  Overnight, ground teams successfully reboosted the Station using thrusters on 67P.  Duration was 03:26, with a delta V of 0.45 m/s.

Node 2 Forward Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration:  Today the crew completed the activity that was begun yesterday to modify the IMV at Node2 Forward.  The installed ducting to provide IMV flow into PMA-2 in preparation for future Visiting Vehicle dockings and installed a new IMV Grille Screen to provide easier cleaning of the Node 2 Overhead Port Alcove IMV Inlet.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #115 on: 11/04/2017 05:02 PM »
Some robotics near Kibo, today...
« Last Edit: 11/05/2017 09:17 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #116 on: 11/04/2017 05:51 PM »
Not sure where to post this but I’ll consider it an expedition 53 shot:

Quote
At 4:19am this morning, the @Space_Station soared over Florida's Space Coast, crossing in front of the full #BeaverMoon! #SpotTheStation

https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/926871628973305858

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #117 on: 11/04/2017 06:06 PM »
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/10/Trick_or_treat

Another Halloween pic (Credit:ESA/NASA)
Do I have these correctly?
Top, left to right:
Ryazansky--ape? or a troll? (What happened to the gorilla suit from the great Scott Kelly gotcha?)
Nespoli--Spiderman (with proper web-slinging finger-pose, I might add)
Bottom, left to right:
Bresnik--Minion
Misurkin--St. George (I didn't know St. George was a hero in the Orthodox tradition as well as for, say, England)
Vande Hei--Wolverine
Acaba--jack o' lantern
« Last Edit: 11/04/2017 06:11 PM by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #118 on: 11/04/2017 06:11 PM »
Some robotics on Kibo, today...
This should be the reinstallation of the repaired MBSU to ESP-2.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #119 on: 11/05/2017 09:50 AM »
This should be the reinstallation of the repaired MBSU to ESP-2.
« Last Edit: 11/05/2017 10:27 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 11/05/2017 10:02 AM »
A view of MT, right now...

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 11/06/2017 08:46 AM »
The crew mentioned to Houston that they observed, and were able to photograph, a sizable re-entry last night.  Paolo has apparently witnessed similar events previously and the crew noted the re-entry was on several frames of imagery and that the ground was illuminated prior to presumed impact.  Houston noted that they were "perusing" the internet for possible correlating events after noting the crew note on the incident this morning.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 11/06/2017 02:04 PM »
November 06, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-131

Virginia Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station
 
Students at Pole Green Elementary School in Mechanicsville, Virginia, will speak with the NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 9:45 a.m. EST on Wednesday, Nov. 8. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Randy Bresnik, Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba will be asked questions by select students. The discussion will include topics about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.
This is Bresnik’s second mission to the station. He currently is serving as the station’s Expedition 53 commander after launching to the orbiting laboratory on July 28. He’s scheduled to return to Earth in December. Vande Hei and Acaba both arrived at the space station on Sept. 12. This is Vande Hei’s first space mission and Acaba’s third. Together they will return to Earth in February 2018.

Pole Green was selected through a competitive process to host a downlink with the station. To prepare for the event, the school plans for a full day of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) lessons and activities for the students. Industry partners supporting the day’s events include the U.S. Navy, Virginia Commonwealth Engineering, Hanover High School robotics, and Math Science Innovation Center of Richmond. Additionally, the teachers are educating the students on the history of the space program, the space station and the astronauts’ backgrounds.

“Our focus is on providing students with the opportunity to see beyond their community,” said Lori Schoenwiesner, a teacher at Pole Green Elementary School. “They can and will be an important part of their country's future and we believe they deserve the opportunity to see their possibilities now so they can prepare for them.”
Media interested in attending the event should contact Chris Whitley via email at cwhitley@hcps.us or phone at 804-365-4500. Pole Green Elementary School is at 8993 Pole Green Park Lane in Mechanicsville.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/
« Last Edit: 11/06/2017 02:04 PM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 11/06/2017 02:46 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/03/2017
 

VEG-03 Science Harvest: The crew cut one to three leaves from each plant for consumption and then preserved them in foil and inserted them into cold stowage for science data. The remainder of the plants will be left to grow and sprout new leaves.  The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember collected saliva samples and completed a questionnaire for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Node 3 to Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Fine Leak Check:  Today, the crew utilized the Internal Sampling Adapter (ISA), Vacuum Access Jumper (VAJ), Multimeter, and ISA Scopemeter Pressure Probe to depress the Node 3 to PMM vestibule to 5 psi for a fine leak check of the Node 3 to PMM Vestibule.  The leak check was successful.

Spare External (EXT) Enhanced Processor and Integrated Communications (EPIC) Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) Build:  The crew configured and tested a spare EXT EPIC MDM.  The MDM was upgraded by swapping the Enhanced (ENH) Input/Output (I/O) Control Unit circuit card for a Pentium I/O Control Unit circuit card and connecting an EXT MDM Ethernet Cover to the new card. Then, the MDM On Orbit Tester (MOOT) hardware/software system was used to perform an IVA functionality test of the new EXT EPIC MDM and reconfigure software on the new EPIC card.  The checkout was successful.  Finally, they removed and replaced the Chotherm on the MDM. Chotherm provides a thermal barrier between MDM Chassis and coldplate.

On-Board Training (OBT) Cygnus Rendezvous: In preparation for Orbital ATK 8 (OA-8) launch, the crew performed this proficiency training on the Cygnus profile including rendezvous crew procedures and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding the vehicle. Cygnus is scheduled to launch Saturday, November 11th with capture and berthing Monday, November 13th.

Mobile Serving System (MSS) Operations:  Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and are maneuvering the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) as required to use SPDM Arm1 to transfer the spare Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) from the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Transfer Interface (JOTI) on the JEM Airlock Slide Table to SPDM Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP) Side 2.  Once this has been completed the Robotics Ground Controllers will configure the SPDM and SSRMS for translation and then translate the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 7 (WS7) to WS3.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 11/07/2017 01:55 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/06/2017
 

MBSU transfer and installation:  On Friday, ground controllers attempted to transfer the recently repaired spare Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) through the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (A/L) and install it on its stowage location on External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP2).  The JEM A/L outer door opened as commanded, but the slide table did not respond to ground commanding via the Airlock Control & Display Unit- Remote Control (ACDU-RC).  The crew was able to command the slide table (bypassing the ACDU-RC) to extend outside on Saturday.  Robotics operations proceeded nominally after that and the MBSU was installed in its stowage location.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock:  After the MBSU transfer over the weekend, the JEM A/L was repressurized and the slide table was brought into the JEM.  The JEM ORU Transfer Interface (JOTI) was removed and Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) was installed in preparation for upcoming an upcoming NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer (NRCSD) deployment series.

Microbial Tracking-2:  Over the weekend and today, a 52S crewmember took saliva samples to support the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember conducted the second half of a two week long Sleep Shift session by tracking his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Astrobee JEM Pressurized Module (JPM) Mapping: To develop a programing map of the ISS, today the crew configured digital camera equipment, used a light meter to measure lighting, and took photos that will make a panorama of the interior of the JPM.  Astrobee is set to arrive on the ISS in Spring 2018, and consists of three self-contained, free flying robots and a docking station for use inside the ISS. The robots are designed to help scientists and engineers develop and test technologies for use in microgravity to assist astronauts with routine chores, and give ground controllers additional eyes and ears on the space station. The autonomous robots, powered by fans and vision-based navigation, perform crew monitoring, sampling, logistics management, and accommodate up to three investigations.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: This morning, a 52S crewmember collected saliva samples and completed a questionnaire for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples will be placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Airway Monitoring Overview and Setup: The crew reviewed reference material and gathered hardware to support tomorrow’s Airway Monitoring session. With dust particles present in the International Space Station atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions. 

Biological Experiment Laboratory (BioLab) Exchange Door Inspection: The crew checked the commanding capability of the BioLab experiment container exchange door. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the European Columbus laboratory. The facility is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates. BioLab allows scientists to gain a better understanding of the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

Orbital-ATK 8 (OA-8) On-board Training (OBT): In preparation for OA-8 berth, currently planned for November 13, the USOS crew conducted Robotic On-Board Trainer (ROBoT) OBT with support from ground teams. The crew reviewed capture procedure, mission profile overview, rendezvous crew procedures and interfaces for monitoring/commanding Cygnus. They also practiced a 30 meter approach and 2 Capture Point hold runs.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 11/07/2017 10:27 PM »
SSRMS on Node-2 "Harmony" nadir PDGF "Power Data Grapple Fixture".
« Last Edit: 11/07/2017 10:34 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 11/07/2017 10:56 PM »
NASA Astronaut Randy "Komrade" Bresnik Page Liked · 1 hr ·
 
"Busy day at work when you have to take the laptop to the outhouse! Just kidding, we need to follow procedures when fixing the space toilet. — with International Space Station. "

A little bathroom humor from space...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 11/08/2017 02:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/07/2017
 

Personal Radiation Shielding for Interplanetary Missions (PERSEO):  Today the crew performed an initial checkout of a radiation shielding garment for the Italian Space Agency (ASI) PERSEO Project. They filled the garment with water, donned the garment, and later doffed the garment before draining the water.  PERSEO evaluates the efficacy of a personal radiation protection system, easily wearable by the astronaut and aimed at risk reduction for exposure to cosmic radiation, particularly in case of solar particle events. The garment has containers that are positioned to shield the more radiosensitive organs. Water is used because of its shielding properties and its ready availability on the ISS. The radiation protection strategy will be tested with dedicated measurements of shielding efficacy.

Airway Monitoring:  The crew set up the Airway Monitoring system in the US Laboratory module today and powered on the Enhancement Unit and the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PFS) for a software upgrade from the ground.  With dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This will help to identify health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, such as to the Moon and Mars, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding such conditions. 

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)-02:  On Sunday the AMS-02 laptop hard drive failed.  Today the crew changed out the drive and installed software on the new hard drive. AMS-02 has collected and analyzed billions of cosmic ray events, and identified millions of these as electrons or positrons (anti-matter). The number of high energy positons increases steadily rather than decaying, which is different than projections from theoretical models and indicates a yet to be identified source of positrons. Researchers have also observed a plateau in the positron growth curve and need additional data to determine why. Results suggest that high-energy positrons and cosmic ray electrons may come from different and mysterious sources. Solving the origin of cosmic rays and antimatter increases understanding of our galaxy.

Story Time From Space: A crewmember participated in the Story Time from Space project by reading I Wonder Why Stars Twinkle today while being videotaped.  The recording will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time From Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books on orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) N21B4A-B R&R:  This morning, the crew replaced RPCM N21B4A_B via a Hot Demate/Mate (HDMM).  No powerdowns were required during this operation.  A new RPCM was installed and successfully established communication with the MDM.  Downstream loads have been successfully powered on.  This R&R has recovered the Node2 ATU1.

EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) Maintenance:  Today the crew performed EMU maintenance, replacing the water line vent tube assembly on EMU 3003 and refilling water tanks.

Node 2 Overhead InterModule Ventilation (IMV) Reconfiguration:  The crew reconfigured the N2 Overhead IMV by replacing ductwork and installing a new high speed fan.  This will provide airflow to Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3).

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 11/08/2017 04:10 PM »
Right now, Capture Training  in preparation for Cygnus OA-8...
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 06:25 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 11/08/2017 06:53 PM »
End of OBT...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 11/09/2017 04:16 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/08/2017
 

Airway Monitoring:  Using the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PFS), the crew performed calibrations and conducted high and low nitric oxide (NO) measurements in the US Laboratory. The Airway Monitoring investigation aims to determine the pulmonary nitric oxide turnover in weightlessness and in combined weightless, hypobaric and hypoxic environments, as well as the lung diffusion capacity for nitric oxide. With dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere, this investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This will help to identify health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, such as to the Moon and Mars, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding such conditions. 

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember provided a sleep log entry to track his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 104 FMS session that was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission, how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth, and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew captured video footage of the Atlantic Ocean that continues to Northwest Africa, and footage of a thunderstorm in Italy that continues to East Europe. The crew also captured imagery of the Pacific Ocean before Singapore that continues over the coast between mainland China, Korea and Japan. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Meteor Hard Drive Swap-out: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.   

Joint Airlock Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) Remove and Replace (R&R):  Today the crew rotated the A/L1F1 rack to access and replace the AL1A4A_B RPCM.  The post-R&R checkout was successful.  This RPCM powers Airlock redundant shell heaters.  After the R&R, they inspected the Lower Left Launch Restraint on the A/L1F1 Rack. This Lower Left Launch Restraint was previously reported as stuck in the fully disengaged position.  The crew was unable to engage the restraint.  The rack is in an acceptable configuration with only 3 of 4 restraints, however.

Cygnus Offset Grapple On-Board Training (OBT):  In preparation for Cygnus arrival, the crew practiced vehicle captures with the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), which was positioned at the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) High Hover position earlier this week in preparation for the training. Following the training, the crew participated in a conference with ground teams to discuss the training session and address any questions.

Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Overhead 1 (O1) Rack Front Cleanup:  The crew prepared the PMMO1 Rack Front to accept cargo during the upcoming Orbital ATK 8 (OA-8) mission by consolidating trash items and staging these items for disposal. During OA-8 cargo operations, these disposal items will be swapped with cargo that arrived on OA-8.

Node 2 Zenith International Docking Adapter (IDA) Control Panel Installation:  The crew installed the IDA Control Panel bracket, IDA Control Panel, and cover on a Closeout Panel in Node 2. This Control Panel will be used to control the IDA at Node 2 Zenith during future Commercial Crew vehicles.  After installation, the control panel was checked out successfully.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 11/09/2017 05:15 PM »
The crew mentioned to Houston that they observed, and were able to photograph, a sizable re-entry last night.  Paolo has apparently witnessed similar events previously and the crew noted the re-entry was on several frames of imagery and that the ground was illuminated prior to presumed impact.  Houston noted that they were "perusing" the internet for possible correlating events after noting the crew note on the incident this morning.

Any further news?  When/where?  Any independent sightings from land, sea, or air?
Support your local planetarium!

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 11/13/2017 06:42 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/09/2017
 
Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 52S subject provided a sleep log entry, and then conducted a series of three Cognition tests throughout the day. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  Today crewmembers configured the Node 3 camera and three other cameras deployed around Node 3 to capture video from multiple views of the crew performing dead lifts and rowing exercises using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and the MED-2 hardware. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Camera Power and Data Exchange: To troubleshoot the LMM wide-field camera capability, the crew exchanged the power connection from the LMM wide-field camera to the LMM confocal camera; and then exchanged the data connection from the LMM confocal camera to the LMM wide-field camera. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew captured video footage of a night pass of the Gulf of Thailand and New York City.  The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos showcasing Earth from space. These videos were taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then will be integrated into videos for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Lab Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Accumulator Refill: The crew set up the Fluid System Servicer (FSS) Fluids Control Pump Assembly (FCPA) and refilled the LAB Low Temperature Loop (LTL) Pump Package Assembly (PPA) accumulator. After FSS operations were complete, they drained and purged the FSS FCPA and jumpers.

Internal Wireless Instrumentation System (IWIS) Tri-Axial Accelerometer (TAA) Replace:  Data collected during ISS reboosts on GMT 117 and GMT 137 indicated that the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) IWIS TAA had detached or had an IWIS TAA issue. Today the crew accessed the hardware and inspected it.  Based on their findings, it was determined that the TAA had hardware issues, and the crew replaced the IWIS TAA with a spare attached to a new IWIS FGB TAA plate.

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Leak Check: Telemetry during the Lab CDRA blower speed test indicates that an air leak is present in the CDRA.  Today the crew inspected the Lab CDRA for a leak using the Ultrasonic Leak Detector (ULD).  A sizable leak was found on Air Selector Valve (ASV) 103. The crew was able to repair the leak by demating and remating the Hydraflow connector. A few other potential small leaks were identified. No other interfaces were demated. Crew tightened fasteners and connectors as needed and closed out the rack. CDRA will run overnight to fully characterize performance improvements.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 11/13/2017 06:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/10/2017
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 51S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 120 blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember provided a sleep log entry to track his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew setup and configured the RED camera in the Cupola to capture video footage of the Nile Delta and South Florida to the Bahamas in the daytime. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Story Time From Space: A crewmember participated in the Story Time from Space project by reading “The Wizard Who Saved the Word” in Spanish today while being videotaped.  The recording will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crewmembers read science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books on orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Orbital-ATK 8 (OA-8) Arrival Preparations: In preparation for OA-8 capture and berthing on Monday, the crew deployed and performed a checkout of the Centerline Berthing Camera System (CBCS) on the Node 1 Nadir hatch. Video from the CBCS will be used to aid Flight Controllers during Visiting Vehicle mating operations.  The crew also reviewed Cygnus capture procedures, and completed a Robotics Onboard Trainer (RoBOT) session to practice Capture Point hold runs and 2-meter runs.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 11/14/2017 11:51 AM »
ISS configuration update, after Cygnus CRS OA-8 berthing to Node 1 "Unity" nadir.
« Last Edit: 11/14/2017 11:54 AM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 11/14/2017 08:29 PM »
Quote
Paolo Nespoli @astro_paolo

ISS Exp-53: a month to go... Grateful to get to share this
 extra-terrestrial adventure with such an amazing crew! #VITAmission
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 11/14/2017 10:04 PM »
Who the heck has removed the UK Union Jack flag from among the other flags in the JPM (see image in previous post)? >:(

It was placed there by Tim Peake in recognition of the UK becoming an (albeit small) partner in the ISS, so does it's removal signal that the UK is not officially recognised as an ISS partner nation? Surely such a decision would have to be a joint decision by all the international partners (including ESA)?

I think that maybe someone within the ISS program just doesn't like the UK, and feels that they have the right/authority to remove the UK flag?

It may seem like a small issue, but it's not just about the flag, it's about the UK not being recognised for our contribution. We may only make a small contribution compared to other nations, but the same can be said of other countries whose flags still reside on the ISS, and any contribution, no matter how small, should be recognised.

I am not happy about this and I think that the UK's flag should be replaced immediately, and I am considering contacting ESA and NASA about this issue.

----------
Edit - attached image:

Top image -  taken circa Dec 2016, Union Jack is present, 15 flags total
Bottom image - taken circa Nov 2017, Union Jack is removed, 14 flags total
« Last Edit: 11/14/2017 10:44 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 11/15/2017 06:01 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/13/2017
 

Orbital-ATK 8 (OA-8) Launch:  Following a 24 hour delay, OA-8 launched successfully from Wallops Island, Virginia atop an Antares rocket on Sunday at 6:19 AM CST.  Capture and berthing to Node 1 Nadir is planned for Tuesday, November 14th starting at 3:50 AM CST. The spacecraft will deliver ~3300 kgs of payloads and supplies to the ISS.

Probiotics Operations: Over the weekend, a crewmember initiated the second of four sampling phases of the JAXA Probiotic investigation by collecting fecal samples and immediately stowing the samples into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). This sampling phases include fecal and saliva sample collections, a questionnaire, and a Probiotic capsule intake. The saliva sample collection, questionnaire, and capsule intake for this phase will be conducted on GMT day 319. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of probiotics on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts under closed microgravity environment This investigation studies the effects of beneficial bacteria (Probiotics) to improve crew members’ intestinal microbiota as well as their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Lighting Effects:  Over the weekend, the 52S subject collected urine samples and provided sleep log entries to track his daily sleep patterns and wakefulness. Today’s sleep log entry concludes the two-week sleep study session that began on GMT 304. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: On Saturday, the crew captured video footage of Southern California at night, the Gulf of Thailand, and the southern tip of India. Today the crew will capture footage of California and the Baja Peninsula. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 51S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 120 blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in MELFI.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

VEG-03 Science Harvest: The crew cut several of the larger leaves from each plant for consumption. The remainder of the plants were left to grow and sprout new leaves.  The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna, which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal.

Augmented Reality Application for Maintenance, Inventory and Stowage (ARAMIS) Maintenance Session: The crew setup the camcorder, connected to an iPad, and ran maintenance sequences. The ARAMIS investigation demonstrates use of augmented reality technology to improve efficiency of operations aboard the space station. Crew time is a precious resource in space and this frees up more time for scientific research. The demonstration uses a single portable device to run preventive maintenance and stowage management or hardware searches.

Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) Installation:  Today, the crew installed SSLAs into the Lab and Node 3. The SSLAs were designed to replace General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) to improve visual acuity and to provide a crew health countermeasure for circadian rhythms, sleep, alertness and performance. To accomplish these goals, SSLAs are designed to operate in 3 modes with 3 distinct spectrum. The different spectrum provide control of the blue portion of the light which impacts melatonin production in humans which impacts sleep.

Sidekick Familiarization:  Today the crew performed a self familiarization session with the Sidekick (aka HoloLens) device in preparation for future use.  A procedure and familiarization video, along with the in-device training provided an overview of the Sidekick device and how to use gestures to interact with the Sidekick software.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #138 on: 11/16/2017 09:06 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/14/2017
 

Orbital 8 (OA-8) Capture/Berthing:  Monday night, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to inspect the Node 1 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). They then maneuvered the SSRMS to the Cygnus high hover position in preparation for Cygnus capture.

Early this morning, the crew monitored the Cygnus approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation and at approximately 10:05 GMT they captured Cygnus. Robotics Ground Controllers then maneuvered Cygnus into position to support an inspection of its Passive CBM.  Following completion of the inspection, they maneuvered and installed it to the Node 1 Nadir Active CBM. The crew ingressed the vehicle at 17:23 GMT and will begin transferring cargo tomorrow.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 51S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 120 urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Simulation of Geophysical Fluid Flow under Microgravity – 2 (Geoflow-2) Experiment Container De-installation: The GeoFlow-2 experiment container was removed by the crew from the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) rack and stowed for disposal. The Geoflow-2 experiment studies heat and fluid flow currents within the Earth’s mantle. Geoflow-2 aims to improve computational methods that scientists and engineers use to understand and predict the processes in the Earth’s mantle that lead to volcanic eruptions, plate tectonics and earthquakes.

Augmented Reality Application for Maintenance, Inventory and Stowage (ARAMIS) Stowage Session: The crew set up a camcorder, connected to an iPad, and ran stowage sequences in the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM). The ARAMIS investigation demonstrates use of augmented reality technology to improve efficiency of operations aboard the space station. Crew time is a precious resource in space and this frees up more time for scientific research. The demonstration uses a single portable device to run preventive maintenance and stowage management or hardware searches.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the Red camera, the crew captured video footage of Australia at sunset. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Spare Latching End Effector (LEE)/Utility Transfer Assembly (UTA) Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) Swap:  Today, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and picked up the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) in preparation for tomorrow’s LEE/FRAM swap activities.  Tomorrow, they will remove the UTA from External Stowage Platform (ESP)-2 and translate the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Work Site (WS)-4 to WS-7. They then remove the LEE and install the UTA on ELC-1. The MT will then be translated back to WS-7 from WS-4 and the LEE will be installed on ESP-2. These activities are in preparation for EVAs planned next January.

Node 1 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Cleaning: The crew performed a deep cleaning of the Node 1 HEPA plenum. Recent imagery showed that the HEPA plenum area in Node 1 is collecting excessive dust and debris on the surface of the plenum as well as crevices around the filters.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #139 on: 11/17/2017 06:02 AM »
November 16, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-135

Tennessee Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on International Space Station
 

Students at Southside Elementary School in Lebanon, Tennessee, will have the opportunity to speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 10:05 a.m. EST Monday, Nov. 20. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.
Students will have the opportunity to ask Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hei questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and scientific research in space. Southside Elementary hosted a school-wide competition for the submission of questions to the astronauts.

This is Bresnik’s second mission to the station, and he serves as the station’s Expedition 53 commander. Bresnik launched to the orbiting laboratory on July 28 and is scheduled to return to Earth in December. Vande Hei arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 and will return to Earth in February 2018. This is his first space mission.
The students at Southside prepared for the downlink by participating in a daily trivia contest. Students also watched videos educating them on the different aspects of living in space such as how astronauts brush their teeth, wash their hair and use the bathroom. In celebration of the downlink, the halls of the school are covered with space themed decorations on the doorways.

“Students have researched and written biographies of the three American astronauts currently on station,” said Southside teacher Leesa Hubbard, who served as the facilitator for the NASA Educational Workshops at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center from 1999-2002. “It is our hope that this experience will bring the science and exploration of space a lot closer to home.”

Media interested in attending the event should contact Jennifer Johnson at Jennifer.johnson@wcschools.com or 615-478-6996. Southside Elementary School is at 1224 Murfreesboro Road in Lebanon.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.
Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #140 on: 11/17/2017 06:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/15/2017
 

Probiotics Operations: The crew completed the second half of the second sampling phase that began on GMT 316 with fecal sample collections. Today’s activities included saliva sample collections, a questionnaire, and a capsule intake. This sampling phase was the second of four sampling phases for the JAXA Probiotic experiment. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of probiotics on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts under closed microgravity environment This investigation studies the effects of beneficial bacteria (Probiotics) to improve crew members’ intestinal microbiota as well as their immune function on long-duration space missions.

TangoLab-2 Card Cube Placement: The crew removed two CubeLabs from a polar that arrived on Orbital 8 (OA-8) and placed the cards in slots 5 and 7 of the TangoLab-2.  TangoLab provides a standardized platform and open architecture for experimental modules called CubeLabs. CubeLab modules may be developed for use in 3-dimensional tissue and cell cultures.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker / INcubator (MERLIN) Sample Transfer: The crew transferred science samples from the powered MERLIN in OA-8 to the STaARS-1 Experiment Facility on the ISS. The objective of the Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems, Inc.-1 Experiment Facility (STaARS-1 EF) is to support biotechnology and life science investigations to characterize the effects of microgravity on living systems. The STaARS-1 EF aims to facilitate advanced studies targeting the molecular responses to microgravity that alter cell physiology and lead to unique cellular processes and the production of novel compounds that can impact pharmaceutical, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biofuel, and discovery sciences.

Robotics Operations:  Overnight, ground controllers ungrappled the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) from the Cygnus module and maneuvered it to pick up the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).  Today, the SSRMS/SPDM system will be used to move the UTA from ESP2 to ELC-1, and moved the LEE from its place on ELC-1 to ESP2.

Cygnus Status: Following yesterday’s successful berthing and crew ingress, today the crew began cargo transfer operations:

On-Board Training (OBT) Cygnus: With the arrival and ingress of OA-8 yesterday, the crew performed an emergency procedures review. All crew members participated in this mandatory OBT.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #141 on: 11/18/2017 02:41 AM »
The crew mentioned to Houston that they observed, and were able to photograph, a sizable re-entry last night.  Paolo has apparently witnessed similar events previously and the crew noted the re-entry was on several frames of imagery and that the ground was illuminated prior to presumed impact.  Houston noted that they were "perusing" the internet for possible correlating events after noting the crew note on the incident this morning.

Any further news?  When/where?  Any independent sightings from land, sea, or air?

I think it's at about 10 seconds in the video

http://blogs.esa.int/VITAmission/2017/11/16/the-backstory-paolo-spots-a-meteoroid-from-the-iss/

The backstory: Paolo spots a meteoroid from the ISS   

Earlier today, we posted a remarkable video comprising a series of night-time photos captured by Paolo Nespoli on 5 November around 22:33 GMT. The images are shown in a time-lapse with a 1-second interval, and were taken while the Space Station was flying from the southern Atlantic Ocean over to Kazakhstan.

Paolo was lucky enough to capture a fast fireball falling to Earth over the Atlantic, off the South Africa west coast – look closely in the video below between 00:07 and 00:08 seconds (at upper right in the frame).

To understand in more detail what Paolo saw, we asked ESA’s Rüdiger Jehn and Detlef Koschny, responsible for near-Earth object (NEO ) activities at the Agency’s Space Situational Awareness Programme, to examine the images.

Comments from Detlef Koschny

    Indeed it looks like a bright meteor, or fireball. When I stretch the scale then I can see that the object was below the airglow – assuming it was close to the Earth limb – see the brightness-adjusted screenshot below:

Screen Shot from video of meteoroid 2017-11-09 at 6.19.38 PM credit: ESA/NASA

Screen Shot from video of meteoroid 2017-11-09 at 6.19.38 PM credit: ESA/NASA

    In the later images, one can see the fireball illuminating the clouds from above, so it must have been close to them – and close to the Earth’s limb. It also seems to show a little tail.
    It’s brighter than all the stars seen in the background; only at the very end of the video before sunrise do we see something of similar brightness – I guess Venus. So, if it is a meteor then it could be a decimeter-sized object.
    It might be a re-entering piece of space debris, but from looking at the entry angle (using the reflection on the clouds as reference) it’s coming in at too steep an angle.

Comments from Rüdiger Jehn

A fireball is basically a very bright meteoroid – a small bit of natural “space rock” – entering Earth’s atmosphere and burning brighter than the background stars. This particular meteoroid was moving much faster than typical, with an estimated speed of around 40 km/s.

This speed is actually quite fast for meteoroids, which typically enter the atmosphere at around 20 km/s.

To get this estimate, Rüdiger went through a rather intricate process, which he explains below:

    I overlaid Paolo’s images with a grid, and measured the distance that the meteoroid was moving between image 2 and 5 (see the faint red line in the image below).

Screen Shot from video of meteoroid 2017-11-09 at 6.19.38 PM credit: ESA/NASA

Screen Shot from video of meteoroid 2017-11-09 at 6.19.38 PM credit: ESA/NASA

    I then assumed that the meteoroid was moving without radial velocity in the plane which is at the horizon and crossed the ‘centre’ of the Earth.
    With this, I measured a distance of 97 km and assuming that image 2 and 5 in the movie are 3 seconds apart, then the velocity would be 32 km/s.
    Adding a small radial velocity component might bring the velocity maybe to 40 km/s, which is quite a fast meteoroid (they average around 20 km/s) – but still in the observable range between 11 and 72 km/s.

Detlef added:

As for the naming convention: A meteor is the light you see when a meteoroid or asteroid enters the atmosphere. The object that causes it – the little piece of rock – is called ‘meteoroid’ if smaller than 1 m, ‘asteroid’ if larger than 1 m (unlikely for this one).

We call bright meteors (brighter than Venus), a fireball. I guess this would qualify as a fireball.

Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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