Author Topic: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread  (Read 6166 times)

Offline Prober

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Blue Origin, though, does expect to start carrying uncrewed research payloads on New Shepard later this year. The company has been working with researchers at Purdue University, the University of Central Florida and Louisiana State University to provide initial “pathfinder” experiments that will fly on the vehicle. “We hope to fly those payloads this year,”

http://spacenews.com/blue-origin-to-ramp-up-new-shepard-tests/#sthash.F1CzDZgZ.dpuf[/font][/size]

Any info on these "pathfinder" payloads? 
They must be far along in the process if they will be launched some time this year.

Edit: some cleanup
« Last Edit: 01/27/2016 03:16 PM by Prober »
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Offline sanman

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #1 on: 01/26/2016 04:21 PM »
Any info on these "pathfinder" payloads?
They must be far along in the process if they will be launched some time this year.

There's this:

https://engineering.purdue.edu/AAE/People/Faculty/showFaculty?resource_id=1370

Quote
Steven H. Collicott

Research Areas

Low-gravity fluid dynamics and capillary fluid physics are the focus of two-phase fluids research. A collaborative aero-elastic study of failures of High-Mast Lighting Towers is underway, led by Professor Connor in Purdue’s School of Civil Engineering. Sprays and internal flows in spray systems plus oil-air flows in turbine engines remain of interest too.


Capillary effects dominate liquid positioning in the weightless portions of spaceflight and in small-scale two-phase fluids systems on Earth. Beginning with work in support of the Gravity Probe-B satellite in 1993, Professor Collicott has become the leading expert in the use of the capillary fluids statics code, Surface Evolver, for both research and real-world engineering in two-phase fluids problems. Research includes designing the “Vane-Gap” experiments for the Capillary Fluids Experiment (CFE) presently in the second set of tests in orbit in the International Space Station, exploring the existence and stability of water droplets in lung passages, designing and building a three-dimensional critical wetting experiment - one of the first experiments to fly on Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket, and many others. Engineering solutions that have grown from research include the best on-orbit propellant-gauging service available for satellites and presently available for owners and operators of satellites.

Also this:

https://fsi.ucf.edu/person/joshua-colwell/

Quote
Joshua Colwell
Assistant Director
...
He was selected as one of three Principal Investigators in Blue Origin’s Pathfinder Program to fly the Microgravity Experiment on Dust in Astrophysical Environments on their New Shepard launch vehicle.


Summary:

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2010/12/21/suborbital-spotlight-blue-origins-shepard/

Quote
EXPERIMENTS
Blue Origin is currently working with several universities on a Phase 1 Research Flight Demonstration Program. The purpose of this program is to serve as a pathfinder, demonstrating the integration and operation of scientific experiments during unmanned test flights of the New Shepard system to high altitudes. The selected experiments are:
- Three-Dimensional Critical Wetting Experiment in Microgravity. The principal investigator of this effort is Dr. Steven Collicott, of Purdue University.
- Microgravity Experiment on Dust Environments in Astrophysics (MEDEA). The principal investigator of this effort is Dr. Joshua Colwell, of the University of Central Florida. The Southwest Research Institute is also contributing to this experiment.
- Effective lnterfacial Tension lnduced Convection (EITIC). The principal investigator of this effort is Dr. John Pojman, of Louisiana State University. Professor Patrick Bunton of William Jewell College is also contributing to this experiment.
« Last Edit: 01/26/2016 04:55 PM by sanman »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #2 on: 01/27/2016 12:34 PM »
Might there be an intrest at universities and High schools for Nanolab payloads on Blue Origin Zero gravity flights?
How difficult would it be to design the Payload that can accommodate this?

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #3 on: 02/11/2016 11:14 PM »
I don't know if there has been written about the Second Nanoracks Conference, at Leiden, the Netherlands, last December, on another BlueOrigin topic. Erika Wagner from BlueOrigin gave a presentation about their payload service at that conference. Lots of interesting info was presented, it can be found on the Nanoracks website.
 (finally you something happens when you submit your name and E-mail.)

The mission schedule was presented. The capsule will be occupied for at least five days with one flight.
The schedule starts at L-3 days with a briefing, payload preparation and payload system check.
At L-2 days normal experiments will be installed inside the capsule, a functional check is executed and the capsule is mated to the booster. At T-1day the Pre-Flight briefing takes place.
At launch day (L-0) untill two hours before launch the payloads can be accessed (they try to improve this to T-30min).
Upon request the earliest opportunity to get the payloads again is 20 minutes after capsule safing. Normal payloads will get acces four to eight hours after safing, when the capsule is returned to the Vehicle Processing Facility.
The two days after launch the payloads are removed from the capsules and the experiment teams depart from the launch site.

In another presentation it is stated that the G-loads are between 2-4G (normal Launch loads). And that there are multiple flight opportunities per week. So multiple capsules are required.

Now the question is will BlueOrigin try the boosters with the same cadence as the capsules, or if they use one booster for multiple capsules. (I think that's unlikely) Or if they need more time to re-certify the boosters so they use multiple boosters per capsule. I think the first is the likeliest and the preferred approach.
The second question is how many times will one capsule and one Booster fly, I think it's about ten times before a thorough inspection of all components have to take place. The engine has started 20 times and has run for more that an hour. And the capsule has experienced ten atmospheric to near vacuum pressure cycles and ten landings.

All in all I think it's an real good service BlueOrigin is trying to offer with New Shepard. I think it even has the possibility to increase the amount of science that can be done on the ISS, because experiments for the ISS could be tested on the New Shepard.

Have fun reading trough the presentation.  ;)

Offline Prober

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #4 on: 02/12/2016 04:45 PM »
Might there be an intrest at universities and High schools for Nanolab payloads on Blue Origin Zero gravity flights?
How difficult would it be to design the Payload that can accommodate this?


I put the request in L2 some time ago


Blue’s payload users guide and interface control documents are really well developed,”

« Last Edit: 02/12/2016 08:14 PM by Prober »
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Offline Kansan52

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #5 on: 02/12/2016 06:12 PM »
When the New Shepherd launch vehicle crashed last year, Blue stated that other launch vehicles were in production. So they have some number of capsules and LVs in mind.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #6 on: 06/04/2017 06:27 PM »
Quote
Erika Wagner, Blue Origin: fly student payloads on New Shepard suborbital vehicle for a cost starting at $5,300. #DPSS17

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/871406586429702144

Quote
It’s the price for a specific package for educational payloads.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/871413714947162112

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #7 on: 07/18/2017 07:44 PM »
Quote
Thomas Driebe, DLR: platforms we use for µg research include Blue Origin’s New Shepard; flying experiments on it in 2nd half 2017. #ISSRDC

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/887391257797865472

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #8 on: 07/19/2017 02:52 PM »
Does someone have any inside information on what is preventing BlueOrigin from launching New Shepard with payloads?
My guess is; that FAA hasn't given an operational licance jet. Their experimental licence has expired, and I think BO has accomplished their landing procedure test objectives with the first two New Shepard systems.
Is BO not allowed to sell payload suborbital launches, without an operational licence?

Or are there performance issues with the New Shepard system that prevent BO from selling enough payload slots? If I'm not mistaken NS hasn't launched with more than 200lb of payloads. The launches reached just over 300 000ft, giving 3 minutes microgravity. Their landing procedure seems to have some performance margin (very slow last couple off feet untill touchdown). Can't they take enough payloads to close the business case. Or do most payloads require much longer microgravity time?
Or could the level o f micro gravity be insufficient?

I really hope it's the launch licence that's preventing New Sheperd flights.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #9 on: 07/20/2017 06:33 AM »
I think the most likely reason for the delay is that Blue is busy getting the next New Shepard launch vehicle and capsule ready for flight.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #10 on: 08/28/2017 11:10 PM »
FAA has now issued a revised New Shepherd launch license that permits carrying of passive or active payloads.
« Last Edit: 08/31/2017 12:24 AM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline gongora

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #11 on: 08/29/2017 03:48 AM »
FAA has now issued a revised New Shepherd launch license that permits carrying of passive or active payloads.

Isn't this their first launch license?  The earlier flights should have been under an experimental flight permit.

Online deruch

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Re: Blue Origin New Shepard Payload Discussion Thread
« Reply #12 on: 08/30/2017 11:06 PM »
This clears the way for them to host paying customers, which they were barred from doing while still flying under the experimental permit.  Under the permit they could fly payloads but not for compensation.
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

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