Author Topic: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)  (Read 29595 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #160 on: 08/31/2017 05:24 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/24/2017

Posted on August 24, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  The crew set up cameras in Node 3 and Cupola to capture video from multiple views of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and MED-2 hardware, applied body markers, performed exercises and transferred video for downlink.  The microgravity environment of space weakens muscle and bone, so orbiting crew members spend significant amounts of time exercising with equipment that is large and bulky.  MED-2 aims to demonstrate that small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions during long-duration space missions with exercise equipment that is smaller in size and mass that equipment currently being used on the ISS.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  The crew will removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP, inserted cells into each cassette and reinserted them into ADSEP.  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes are used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time. 

Vascular Echo Ultrasound:  With guidance from a ground expert, a crewmember performed an ultrasound of the femoral artery on their right leg after a one minute light leg exercise. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Vascular Echo investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then upon their return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health.

Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Biomission:  The crew deinstalled Biomission experiment containers from the Kubik 5 facility in the Columbus module, completing the fifth run.  Each of the containers will be placed into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in order to preserve the scientific samples.  Kubik 5 supports Biomission investigations by providing a small controlled-temperature incubator / cooler for the study of biological samples in a microgravity environment.  Kubik is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

Lighting Effects: This morning a crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #161 on: 08/31/2017 05:25 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/25/2017

Posted on August 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lung Tissue:  The crew took samples and fixed media in Tissue Bags. They then inserted the bags in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) Intraterrestrial Fungus (iFUNGUS): The crew removed 2 sample bags from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and inserted them in the STaARS facility for incubation times of 8 and 11 hours, respectively.  The bags were later removed and stored in a MELFI. The crew repeated the above steps for 2 more sample bags but for incubation times of 18 and 23 hours.  STaARS-iFUNGUS cultures a rare type of fungus in the microgravity environment of space to support the search for new antibiotics. The fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, comes from deep in the Earth’s subsurface and shows potential as a source for new antibacterial compounds. For the iFUNGUS experiment frozen fungal spores are transported to the ISS, fungus is grown in different nutrient mixtures over different intervals, and frozen samples are returned to Earth where scientists examine how they grew and what chemicals they produced. Discoveries generated by this research can foster further research and production efforts that utilize low gravity conditions to create novel compounds or other products.

MagVector:  The crew performed closeout and cleanup activities for the 7-day MagVector Run #12.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how the Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research may help improve future ISS experiments and offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  The crew replaced old food bars and cleaned the Animal Habitats to support the ongoing RR-9 investigation which studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays on the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joints, eyes and the immune system.

SUPVIS-Justin:  The crew set up hardware for ESA’s SUPVIS-Justin investigation operations and completed a protocol operation.  SUPVIS-Justin, part of the Meteron program, aims to demonstrate that an astronaut on an orbiting space station can command a robot via a tablet PC to perform complex tasks on a planetary surface. The SUPVIS Justin experiment includes an extended supervised autonomy concept: the crew gives high level commands to the robot, which then uses its local intelligence and decision-making capability to execute a task independently, according to pre-programmed algorithms. In this sense, the responsibility of decision-making is shared between the crew and the robot.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a MELFI.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time.

Lighting Effects: A crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Dose Tracker:  A crewmember made a weekly medication tracking entry in the Dose Tracker application that runs on an iPad. Dose Tracker documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The investigation is expected to provide anecdotal evidence of medication effectiveness during flight and any unusual side effects experienced. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is occurring during missions.

On-Board Training (OBT) Soyuz Descent Drill: In preparation for 50S undock, the 50S crew participated in a nominal descent drill.  In addition to the drill, they consulted with ground teams regarding returning equipment and Soyuz stowage. Undock and landing are scheduled for Saturday, September 2.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R): The crew R&Rd the WHC urine receptacle and insert filter.

Starboard Crew Quarters (CQ) Cleaning: In preparation for 50S departure from the ISS next week, the crew cleaned the starboard CQ intake and exhaust ducts as well as fans and airflow sensors.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #162 on: 09/02/2017 08:31 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/31/2017

Posted on August 31, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Special Daily Summary during JSC Closure

August 28th – September 1st

50S Crew Departure Preparations.  In preparation for their return to Earth this weekend, the 50S Crew cleaned their Crew Quarters, stowed returning items within the Soyuz and conducted a descent drill to review undocking procedures and timelines.  50S undock is scheduled for Saturday, September 2nd at 4:58PM with landing occurring in Kazakhstan’s Southern Landing Zone at 8:22PM. 

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) Intraterrestrial Fungus (iFUNGUS): On Saturday the crew removed 2 sample bags from the STaARS facility after incubation times of 18 hours for one of the bags and 23 hours for the other.  The STaARS-iFUNGUS investigation cultures a rare type of fungus in the microgravity environment of space to support the search for new antibiotics. The fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, comes from deep in the Earth’s subsurface and shows potential as a source for new antibacterial compounds. For the iFUNGUS experiment, frozen fungal spores are transported to the ISS, thawed and grown in different nutrient mixtures over different time intervals, and frozen samples are then returned to Earth where scientists examine how they grew and what chemicals they produced. Discoveries generated by this research can foster further research and production efforts that utilize low gravity conditions to create novel compounds or other products.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  On Saturday the crew removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP and inserted the samples into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes is used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  On Tuesday the crew cleaned the mouse habitats, collected fecal samples and exchanged food cartridges.  Today and tomorrow they will collect blood samples from the mice.  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  Tomorrow the crew will replace old food bars and clean the Animal Habitats to support the ongoing RR-9 investigation.  RR-9 studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joints, eyes and the immune system.

Lung Tissue:  On Wednesday the crew collected samples and fixed media in Tissue Bags.  They inserted the bags into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  On Sunday and Tuesday the crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a MELFI.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time. 

Lighting Effects: Over the last week the crew has provided multiple sleep log entries for the Lighting Effects investigation. On Monday the crewmember transferred the Visual Performance Test hardware to their crew quarters, set the light to the correct mode, turned all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performed a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test.  On Tuesday the crew took meter readings in the Columbus module.  Today two crewmembers completed a battery of cognitive tests on a laptop.  The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Aquapad:  Today the crew removed two Aquapad holders from an incubation bag and took pictures using the Everywear application for ground analysis.  The water that astronauts drink on the ISS is primarily from the recycling of water from the crew’s sweat, urine, and other reclaimed wastewater sources. Recycling reduces the number of supply missions needed and supports development of self-sufficient spacecraft for future missions beyond earth orbit.  Using a device that consists of a simple absorbent cotton injected with water and the laptop application, Aquapad aims to improve the speed and efficiency of water potability tests on board the ISS.

Genes in Space 3:  On Monday the crew processed samples in the Biomolecule Sequencer.  Genes in Space-3 seeks to establish a robust, user-friendly DNA sample preparation process to support biological monitoring aboard the ISS. The project joins two previously spaceflight tested molecular biology tools, Miniature Polymerase Chain Reaction (miniPCR) and the MinION, along with some additional enzymes to demonstrate DNA amplification, sample preparation for DNA sequencing, and sequencing of actual samples from the ISS. The Genes in Space-3 experiments demonstrate ways in which portable, real-time DNA sequencing can be used to assay microbial ecology, diagnose infectious diseases and monitor crew health aboard the ISS.

Genes in Space 4:  On Tuesday the crew completed two sessions for Genes in Space 4 that included processing of samples in the miniPCR.  The final session for the Genes in Space 4 investigation was completed today.  Genes in Space 4 is a high-school science experiment that examines gene expression related to special repair proteins known as heat shock proteins. Many organisms manufacture heat shock proteins to protect cells from heat, cold, radiation, or other stresses, but scientists are looking for additional insight into genetic switches that activate these proteins. Genes in Space 4 uses the well-studied worm, C. elegans, and an advanced miniaturized DNA identification system to detect genetic expression of heat shock proteins in the high-radiation microgravity environment of space.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF): Tomorrow the crew will use a fiberscope to investigate an unidentified object in the ELF furnace chamber that is affecting sample position control.  The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Biological Research in Canisters-22 (BRIC-22):  The crew performed actuation of four BRIC-22 canisters today.  Previous investigations have shown certain proteins regulate genetic activity in a way that protects plants from the extended physical stress of spaceflight.  BRIC-22 studies 8 different variants of thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) to determine the genetic regulation of stress responses.

ISS Non-invasive Sample Investigation and results Transmission to ground with the Utmost easiness (In Situ):  Today the crew collected a saliva sample and processed it in the bioanalyzer for the In Situ investigation.  As part of the nominal continuous monitoring of ISS crewmembers for health changes, saliva samples are taken and returned to Earth. The In Situ bioanalysis uses a portable device that can check crew members’ saliva on board the ISS, enabling direct real-time analysis. The device’s first uses are to monitor stress levels and appetites among crew members.  Humans living in space experience dramatic changes to their health, from weakened bone and muscle to reduced appetites and increased stress levels. The device uses disposable cartridges that check for the presence of the stress hormone cortisol.  A miniature analytical device that can detect certain biomarkers using non-invasively collected samples would benefit health care workers on Earth, from emergency medical technicians on call, to small rural clinics in developing countries.

Body Measures: On Monday a crewmember completed a Body Measures session with assistance from a trained operator. NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing.  Still and video imagery is captured and a tape measure is used to measure segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data for all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed multiple FMS sessions this week. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the eight Space Bubble Detectors from a Russian crewmember on Monday, a USOS crewmember deployed the detectors in the Columbus module for the Radi-N2 experiment. This Canadian Space Agency’s RaDI-N investigation uses the bubble detectors to measure neutron radiation levels in the ISS.

Sprint Ultrasound 2:  For a Sprint Ultrasound 2 session on Monday a crewmember, with support from an operator, configured the Ultrasound 2, placed reference marks on the calf and thigh of their right leg, donned the thigh and calf guides, and performed thigh and calf scans with remote guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

NeuroMapping: On Tuesday a USOS crewmember performed a Neuromapping test in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crewmember executed three behavioral assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.   

Circadian Rhythms:  On Wednesday a crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab sensors and mounted the Thermolab Unit to their belt, beginning 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythms investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Redundant Galley Food Warmer Installation:  Today, the crew successfully installed a second Galley Food Warmer which arrived onboard SpX-12.  The new Food Warmer was installed next to the primary unit currently in use in Node 1. This Food Warmer will be used as a spare due to the fact that only one warmer can be powered at a time.

SpaceX Dragon Cargo Ops:  The crew continues to pack items for return on SpX-12.  As of Monday, approximately 21 hours of packing remained to be completed. SpX-12 is scheduled to unberth and return to earth on September 17, 2017.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #163 on: 09/02/2017 08:31 AM »
Jack Fischer‏@Astro2fish ·

That’s all folks! Expedition 52 came to a close today as @AstroKomrade took over. Watch our journey home tomorrow, landing at 9:22 p.m. EDT.


Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #164 on: 09/03/2017 03:41 AM »
September 03, 2017
RELEASE 17-075


NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who set multiple U.S. space records during her mission aboard the International Space Station, along with crewmates Jack Fischer of NASA and Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, safely landed on Earth at 9:21 p.m. EDT Saturday (7:21 a.m. Kazakhstan time, Sunday, Sept. 3), southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.

While living and working aboard the world’s only orbiting laboratory, Whitson and Fischer contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science, welcomed several cargo spacecraft delivering tons of supplies and research experiments, and conducted a combined six spacewalks to perform maintenance and upgrades to the station.

Among their scientific exploits, Whitson and Fischer supported research into the physical changes to astronaut’s eyes caused by prolonged exposure to a microgravity environment. They also conducted a new lung tissue study that explored how stem cells work in the unique microgravity environment of the space station, which may pave the way for future stem cell research in space.

Additional research included an antibody investigation that could increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs for cancer treatment, and the study of plant physiology and growth in space using an advanced plant habitat. NASA also attached the Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass Investigation (ISS CREAM) on the outside of the space station in August, which is now observing cosmic rays coming from across the galaxy.

The crew members received a total of seven cargo deliveries during their mission. A Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle launched to the space station in December 2016 delivering new lithium-ion batteries that were installed using a combination of robotics and spacewalks. Orbital ATK’s Cygnus spacecraft arrived at the station in April on the company's seventh commercial resupply mission. Three SpaceX Dragon spacecraft completed commercial resupply missions to the station in February, June and August. And, Russian ISS Progress cargo spacecraft docked to the station in February and June.

Whitson’s return marks the completion of a 288-day mission that began last November and spanned 122.2 million miles and 4,623 orbits of the Earth – her third long-duration mission on the station. During her latest mission, Whitson performed four spacewalks, bringing her career total to 10. With a total of 665 days in space, Whitson holds the U.S. record and places eighth on the all-time space endurance list.

Fischer, who launched in April, completed 136 days in space, during which he conducted the first and second spacewalks of his career. Yurchikhin, who launched with Fischer, now has a total of 673 days in space, putting him seventh place on the all-time endurance list.

Expedition 53 continues operating the station, with Randy Bresnik of NASA in command, and Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) serving as flight engineers. The three-person crew will operate the station until the arrival of NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba, and Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos. Vande Hei, Acaba and Misurkin are scheduled to launch Sept. 12 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on Instagram and Twitter at:

https://instagram.com/iss

and

https://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

-end-

Picture Credit:
NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, and NASA astronaut Jack Fischer undergo routine initial medical checks after returning from their mission aboard the International Space Station at 9:21 p.m. EDT Saturday (7:21 a.m. Kazakhstan time, Sunday, Sept. 3), landing southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.
Credits: NASA TV
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #165 on: 09/03/2017 10:18 PM »
This is very cool - Peggy & Paolo have recreated a photo of them both from STS-120, in exactly the same place on the ISS, just 1 month shy of exactly 10 years ago (Oct 2007).

The original image (the bottom attachment) shows Peggy & Paolo at the Node 1 Port hatchway, preparing for the first entry into Node 2 (which was temporarily berthed there at the time).

Now, they have recreated the exact same picture (although of course Node 3 is now located at N1P).

Neat.

[And for the real ISS geeks - note that the CBM hatches in both pictures are mis-aligned by 90 degrees (in the new image Peggy is holding onto a yellow handrail on the left, whereas in the original image the yellow handrail is on the top) - this is because of the 90-degree "clocking" of Node 3.] :)
« Last Edit: 09/03/2017 10:25 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #166 on: 09/11/2017 08:11 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 5: Buddy of Astronauts



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