Author Topic: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017  (Read 4648 times)

Offline beidou

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From a recent presentation made by ESA representative (Guenter Hein) on IAIN 2015 conference:
Quote
FOC-M6 (Launch in autumn 2017, Ariane-5)
• FM15-18 at OHB Bremen, under integration
« Last Edit: 09/07/2017 02:37 PM by Jester »

Offline beidou

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Q3 2017
« Reply #1 on: 11/18/2016 03:11 PM »
According to the launch kit of VA233, this mission will be in the third quarter of 2017.

Offline beidou

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Quote
Launch of Galileo

In coordination with the EC, an Ariane 5 will for the second time use a new payload dispenser to release four identical satellites into orbit in one go.

Location: CSG, Europe’s Spaceport (French Guiana)

Expected date: 9 August
Source: http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_activities_in_2017_of_interest_to_media

Offline Jester

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Outdated info, looking like November/December

Offline jgoldader

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I saw an article on phys.org just now about failed clocks on the Galileo sats already launched.  Each satellite has two rubidium and two hydrogen maser clocks (one primary and one backup each, IIRC), and of the 18 sats launched, 3 rubidium and 6 hydrogen clocks have failed.  ESA is exploring how to proceed.

https://phys.org/news/2017-01-clocks-onboard-europe-satellites-esa.html
Recovering astronomer

Offline Nick L

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Jan Woerner, the director general of the European Space Agency (Esa), told a meeting with reporters today:
 "Everybody is raising this question: should we postpone the next launch until we find the root cause, or should we launch?

"You can give both answers at the same time. You can say we wait until we find the solution but that means if more clocks fail we will reduce the capability of Galileo. But if we launch we will at least maintain if not increase the [capability], but we may then take the risk that a systematic problem is not considered. We are right now in this discussion about what to do."

Each Galileo satellite carries two rubidium and two hydrogen maser clocks. The multiple installation enables a satellite to keep working after an initial failure.

All 18 spacecraft currently in space continue to operate, but one of them is now down to just two clocks.

Esa staff at its technical centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands are trying to isolate the cause the of failures - with the assistance of the clock and satellite manufacturers. (It is understood engineers have managed to get one stopped hydrogen clock restarted).

Esa is also in contact with the Indian space agency which is using the same clocks in its sat-nav system. So far, the Indians have not experienced the same failures.

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38664225
« Last Edit: 01/18/2017 11:26 AM by Nick L »

Offline Nick L

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In this article, ESA and the European commission have agreed to delay Galileo's next launch by 3-4 months, to late 2017.
Confirming Jester's post.

https://www.spaceintelreport.com/galileo-clocks

Offline Jester

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lets say its rather busy right now ;)
Its tricky issue to get to the bottom of, you can only test so much on-ground and everything worked fine on-ground.

keep in mind we have 4 clocks per satellite, so we can continue to operate.

But yes, it looks like another end of the year launch, arianespace x-mas hats included...
First, loads of work ahead.



Offline beidou

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This massive atomic clock failure can easily defer the launch into 2018 if root cause is not quickly hunted out...

Offline Jester

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This massive atomic clock failure can easily defer the launch into 2018 if root cause is not quickly hunted out...

Although its an issue, 6 out of 72 clocks is hardly massive.


Offline Jester

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plan is to launch before end 2017, this plan includes understanding the issue, fixing it, re-test and re-qual.
So, yes we will be busy :)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Although its an issue, 6 out of 72 clocks is hardly massive.

A failure rate of 8.3% is pretty bad.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline baldusi

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Although its an issue, 6 out of 72 clocks is hardly massive.

A failure rate of 8.3% is pretty bad.
The correct figure of merit is mean time to failure, I'm not so worried about the IOV failures, but the FOC are much more worrisome if you consider the required mean life of the satellites.

Offline beidou

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Although its an issue, 6 out of 72 clocks is hardly massive.

A failure rate of 8.3% is pretty bad.

In fact, 10 out of 72 clocks have had problems, so the failure rate is 13.9%, which is even worse.

Offline beidou

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Currently on track for a launch in December 2017.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 02 2017
« Reply #15 on: 09/05/2017 12:46 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Offline beidou

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 02 2017
« Reply #16 on: 09/05/2017 08:54 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Doesn't the last satellite mean FOC FM22? I think FOC FM22 will not launched in this mission.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 02 2017
« Reply #17 on: 09/05/2017 09:38 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Doesn't the last satellite mean FOC FM22? I think FOC FM22 will not launched in this mission.
There are some FOC's that do not yet have an assigned rocket yet.

Offline Jester

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 02 2017
« Reply #18 on: 09/07/2017 02:36 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Doesn't the last satellite mean FOC FM22? I think FOC FM22 will not launched in this mission.
There are some FOC's that do not yet have an assigned rocket yet.

They are all assigned, 2x A5's

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017
« Reply #19 on: 09/07/2017 02:48 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Doesn't the last satellite mean FOC FM22? I think FOC FM22 will not launched in this mission.
There are some FOC's that do not yet have an assigned rocket yet.

They are all assigned, 2x A5's
So you are saying these are also assigned:
per NSF Arianespace Schedule:
2020:
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM23, Galileo-FOC FM24 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM25, Galileo-FOC FM26 - TBD - Kourou

Offline Jester

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Re: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017
« Reply #20 on: 09/07/2017 02:53 PM »
Last Galileo leaves ESA’s Test Centre

4 September 2017
The last of 22 Galileo satellites has departed ESA’s Test Centre in the Netherlands – concluding the single longest and largest scale test campaign in the establishment’s history.

Cocooned in a protective container for its journey – equipped with air conditioning, temperature control and shock absorbers – the final Galileo satellite left the establishment by lorry on 24 August.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Last_Galileo_leaves_ESA_s_Test_Centre

Doesn't the last satellite mean FOC FM22? I think FOC FM22 will not launched in this mission.
There are some FOC's that do not yet have an assigned rocket yet.

They are all assigned, 2x A5's
So you are saying these are also assigned:
per NSF Arianespace Schedule:
2020:
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM23, Galileo-FOC FM24 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM25, Galileo-FOC FM26 - TBD - Kourou

I meant FM's that actually excist ;-)

Offline bolun

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Re: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017
« Reply #21 on: 09/14/2017 07:42 AM »
September 13, 2017

The Ariane 5 for Arianespace’s next Galileo mission arrives at the Spaceport

Elements for Arianespace’s Ariane 5 mission in December have been delivered to the Spaceport in French Guiana for the heavy-lift launcher’s second flight at the service of Europe’s Galileo global satellite navigation system.

These components arrived this month in French Guiana aboard the MN Colibri, which is one of two sea-going roll-on/roll-off ships that transport launcher hardware from Europe to the South American launch site for Arianespace’s family of launch vehicles.

The year-end launch will orbit four more Galileo spacecraft, to be deployed into medium Earth orbit from a dispenser system on the Ariane 5 ES launcher version equipped with a re-ignitable upper stage. Galileo is designed to provide a new European global satellite navigation system with precision positioning services under civilian control.

A December liftoff for Ariane 5 and its Galileo satellites

Designated Flight VA240 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, the mission is targeted for December 12. As the latest mission carrying Galileo satellites, Flight VA240 is to be performed on behalf of the European Commission under a contract with the European Space Agency (ESA).

Galileo is funded by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. ESA is assigned design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure.

Arianespace already has launched 18 Galileo spacecraft, with four being orbited on a previous Ariane 5 mission (Flight VA233 in November 2016), and the others lofted by seven medium-lift Soyuz vehicles carrying two satellites each.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/ariane-5-arrives-in-french-guiana/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017
« Reply #22 on: 09/19/2017 01:00 PM »
Quote
DutchSpace‏ @DutchSpace 9m9 minutes ago

Something has arrived.... #CSG #VA240 #Galileo

https://twitter.com/DutchSpace/status/910123675042631682

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Re: Ariane 5 VA240 - Galileo-FOC FM015, 16, 17&18 - Dec 12 2017
« Reply #23 on: 09/20/2017 02:11 PM »
Quote
Special delivery! 2 of the 4 #Galileo satellites for launch on #Ariane5 Flight #VA240 have arrived in French Guiana @EU_Commission @esa #OHB

https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/910505875751792640
« Last Edit: 09/20/2017 02:11 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Cross-post from the VA239 thread:
Quote
Ariane 5   September 28, 2017

Galileo satellites are readied for Flight VA240 in December

In other activity at the Spaceport, the first two satellites for Arianespace’s Flight VA240 with Ariane 5 have begun their checkout. Targeted for a liftoff on December 12 carrying a quartet of Galileo navigation spacecraft, this mission will be performed on behalf of the European Commission under a contract with the European Space Agency (ESA).

Arianespace already has launched 18 Galileo spacecraft, with four being deployed into medium Earth orbits on a previous Ariane 5 mission (Flight VA233 in November 2016), and the others lofted by seven medium-lift Soyuz vehicles carrying two satellites each.

Galileo is designed to provide a European global satellite navigation system with precision positioning services under civilian control.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/ariane-5-mission-preps/
« Last Edit: 09/29/2017 02:11 AM by zubenelgenubi »
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