Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Spaceflight SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) : Q2 2018  (Read 52024 times)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Some details from the pictures that stand out to me.
1) Are they going to use plates with 4x24U 12U deployers on SSO-A. I didn't know these 24U deployers.
2) The 6x6U Cubestack, in replies #55 & #59 from gongora image of a mockup of this ring are shown.
3) Detail of the stack on the laptop on image 2.
It looks like they are using the ASAP-S at the bottom. Above that are a Sherpa-0 ring with the 6x6U CubeStack. Than a (moog) SoftRide ring with another Sherpa-0 24" ESPA (heavy)-ring on top. Then the adapter to the payload on top, it looks like there are several (~6) 6U dispensers mounted on this adapter structure. Very nice and complicated stack.

Edit: I watched the video added to the spaceflight modal survey article.
I noted that the bottom Sherpa looks more spherical instead of cilindrical, could this be a Sherpa with propulsion module, or did they need clearance for the payload underneath ASAP-S/ this Sherpa?

(I've removed the ugly detail images)
I just realized this was already discussed on Reddit
Final edit: Spaceflight is releasing an updated "general payload user's guide' at the end of 2017. Hopefully this will explain a lot.
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 01:04 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Online gongora

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Does anyone know if these U.S. Coast Guard "Polar Scout" cubesats will be on SSO-A?  It says launching on a SpaceX rocket in 2018.

[The Day] Can tiny satellites help the Coast Guard do its job?

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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On this SSO-A launch, a Sherpa(-0) payload carriing ring will be debuted.
This was reported in the Spacenews Q&A Curt Blake article.
Most likely the bulbous ring is the maiden Sherpa-0 (without propulsion module).
edit: And it has 6 24" mounting locations now.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2017 12:05 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Online gongora

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On this SSO-A launch, a Sherpa(-0) payload carriing ring will be debuted.
This was reported in the Spacenews Q&A Curt Blake article.
Most likely the bulbous ring is the maiden Sherpa-0 (without propulsion module).

SHERPA should be the ring(s) at the top.

I wonder when/if they are going to file FCC documents like they did for the cancelled SHERPA flight.

Offline Robotbeat

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I assume Arkyd-6 is still flying here?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Online gongora

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I assume Arkyd-6 is still flying here?

Still?  Was Arkyd-6 supposed to be on this flight?  Gunter shows it on PSLV.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2017 01:51 PM by gongora »

Online gongora

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http://www.comnews.ru/content/110183/2017-10-25/kazahstan-vzyalsya-za-sozdanie-sputnikov
Google translate
Quote
Initially, KazSTSAT was planned to be launched on the Dnepr rocket, but due to the temporary collapse of the launch services operator Kosmotras, the Kazakh side opted for the US SpaceX launch vehicle. Vice Minister of Defense and Aerospace Industry of the Republic of Kazakhstan Marat Nurguzhin said at the conference "Kazakhstan's path to space 2017" that the launch is scheduled for April 2018 - simultaneously with the second Kazakhstans scientific satellite, which will be based on CubeSat technology.

Online Mark McCombs

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Online gongora

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One of the NGSO constellations that has applied to the FCC is from Audacy.  They're planning something a little different from most of the other constellations:  a data relay service operating from MEO that other satellites can use for data and TT&C communications instead of communicating directly with ground stations.

Audacy is launching a 3U test sat, and it appears to be on SSO-A.

Quote
Mission Overview:

Audacy Zero is a 3U CubeSat demonstration mission to test out Audacy’s user communications
terminal and first ground station in the San Francisco Bay Area. The spacecraft is consistent with the
CubeSat standard with stowed dimensions of 11.12 cm x 11.12 cm x 34.05 cm (L x W x H). The total
mass is estimated to be 4.7 kg. Audacy Zero is launching to a 575 km sun-synchronous orbit, which
can lead to a total mission lifetime of 4.4 years.

Audacy Zero will utilize a prototype communications terminal operating in the K and K a bands with a
high gain and a low gain antenna. Primary data transmission will focus on telemetry, tracking, and
command (TT&C) from the communications terminal and subsystems to maintain successful
operations and analysis of the terminal hardware. Payload data includes pictures and videos taken
from an on-board camera and occasional transmissions from a secondary optical communications
payload.

Launch Vehicle: SpaceX Falcon 9

Launch Site: Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, USA

Mission Duration: Up to 4.4 years until Audacy Zero reenters via atmospheric orbital decay
assuming the expected atmospheric drag profile.

Launch and Deployment Profile: The Falcon 9 launch vehicle will launch into roughly circular 575
km 97.9° sun-synchronous orbit. Upon confirmation of final stage burn-out, the primary and
secondary payloads will be dispensed from the payload fairing. The primary payload is from Terra
Bella/Planet. Audacy Zero will deploy to the following orbit:

Apogee: 575 km

Perigee: 575 km

Inclination: 97.9°

Audacy Zero has no propulsion and will not actively change orbits or engage in a parking or transfer
orbit.

There is even a hosted payload, a 1U optical experiment for Stanford called POINTR:
Quote
Polar Orbiting INfrared Tracking Receiver (POINTR) is an in flight demonstration of an optical receiver pointing, acquisition and tracking (PAT) system. The optical receiver payload hosted on Audacy’s 3U cubesat would be pointed to the ground to acquire and track a beacon laser sent from a suitable ground facility, currently proposed as NASA JPL’s OCTL facility. This mission would demonstrate the operational and technical requirements related to two satellites establishing an optical communications link with each other. The requirements include mission planning, command and execution of a pointing maneuver, acquisition of an incoming optical signal and tracking of the optical signal. It is planned to launch in early 2018.

(The ODAR document attached has most of the interesting info for the test sat.)

Online gongora

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Found a mention of ORS-6 in an article:

[Defense One Nov. 19, 2017] As the US Air Force Turns Its Focus to Space, This Small Team Could Lead the Way
Quote
...a satellite about the size of a refrigerator is being pieced together by a small team of workers wearing lab coats. It’s the ORS group’s sixth satellite. If all goes as planned, airmen here at Kirtland will use the satellite to measure the height and direction of the sea.

The satellite is being built through a unique arrangement here on a military base, not at some far-off defense contractor factory. Its bus and payload — made, respectively, by Northrop Grumman and the California Institute of Technology’s Jet Propulsion Lab — were built for other projects that didn’t materialize. A company called Millennium Engineering is putting it all together.

When it heads to orbit next year, it will launch on a SpaceX rocket with other non-military satellites, a ride-share arrangement that one Air Force official compared to taking a bus instead of driving alone in a car. The price is a mere $10 million, a fraction of what it would cost to fly on its own rocket, said Lt. Col. Eric Moomey, chief of programs in the Operationally Responsive Space office.

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