Author Topic: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe (aka Solar Probe Plus) - SLC-37 - July 31, 2018  (Read 25438 times)

Online zubenelgenubi

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Delta Mariner was designed for 3 CBCs.
Quote
The Mariner can carry up to three common booster cores, which are as long as a 737 airline fuselage each.
http://www.ulalaunch.com/united-launch-alliance-continues.aspx

The 2 side Delta IV-H core stages EFT-1 Orion flight were delivered separately from the center core, as well.  Why, if there is capacity for all 3 core stages?
« Last Edit: 08/03/2017 08:06 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline russianhalo117

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Delta Mariner was designed for 3 CBCs.
Quote
The Mariner can carry up to three common booster cores, which are as long as a 737 airline fuselage each.
http://www.ulalaunch.com/united-launch-alliance-continues.aspx

The 2 side Delta IV-H core stages EFT-1 Orion flight were delivered separately from the center core, as well.  Why, if there is capacity for all 3 core stages?
Priority Atlas CCB in the middle slot onboard.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
Final Rocket Components Arrive in Florida for Parker Solar Probe
Posted on September 1, 2017 at 3:06 pm by Anna Heiney.

All components of the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket that will launch NASA’s Parker Solar Probe have arrived for prelaunch processing at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The Port Common Booster Core of the Delta IV Heavy for the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) Mission is offloaded from the Mariner and transported to the Horizontal Integration Facility. The rocket’s second stage arrived Saturday, Aug. 26, along with the third and final common booster core, which will complete the first stage. The hardware was delivered by ship to Port Canaveral, then transported by truck to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 37.

The Parker Solar Probe will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.

This entry was posted in Parker Solar Probe on September 1, 2017.

Caption for 1st photo:
Quote
A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy common booster core arrives at the Horizontal Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for preflight processing. The Delta IV Heavy will launch NASA’s upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission.
Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston

Caption for 2nd photo:
Quote
The Port Common Booster Core of the Delta IV Heavy for the Parker Solar Probe Mission is offloaded from the Mariner ship for transport to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 37.
Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky.

Caption for 3rd photo:
Quote
Sunrise is reflected in the side of the Mariner ship and in the water of Port Canaveral below.
Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston
« Last Edit: 09/02/2017 01:09 AM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online catdlr

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September 20, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-108
Media Invited to View NASA Spacecraft That Will Touch Our Sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will be humanity’s first-ever mission to explore the Sun’s outer atmosphere. Media are invited to see the spacecraft and learn about the mission from noon to 2 p.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 25, at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, where the probe is being built.

The spacecraft will be in full flight configuration, complete with its revolutionary heat shield, and members of the engineering and science teams conducting this historical mission will be available for interviews.

Media who would like to attend must register with APL by sending an email with name, affiliation and cell phone number to aplpublicaffairs@jhuapl.edu no later than 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 22. Instructions on attendance will be provided upon registration.

Due to facility limitations, the number of participants is limited, and the event is open only to U.S. citizens. The event will take place in a clean room. Attendees should allow additional time for cleaning of cameras and equipment by APL staff.

The spacecraft, about the size of a small car, will launch in mid-summer 2018. It will travel directly through the Sun's atmosphere about four million miles from our star's surface – facing heat and radiation unlike any spacecraft in history – and make critical observations to answer decades-old questions about how stars work. Mission data ultimately will improve forecasts of major space weather events that affect life on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space.

To learn more about the mission, visit: 

https://www.nasa.gov/solarprobe

-end-

Picture source: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/psp.jpg
Tony De La Rosa

Online catdlr

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Parker Solar Probe Gets its Revolutionary Heat Shield: Time Lapse

NASA.gov Video
Published on Sep 26, 2017


In this time-lapse video taken on Sept. 21, 2017, the thermal protection system – the heat shield -- for NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft is shown during installation at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. This 4.5-inch thick, eight-foot diameter shield protects the spacecraft and its instruments against the intense heat and energy of the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the corona, through which the spacecraft will fly on a mission of extreme exploration. The thermal protection system is made of a carbon-carbon composite material with a special outer coating that will reach temperatures of nearly 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. The heat shield was placed on the probe for a test of alignment as part of integration and testing, but it will soon be removed.  Both spacecraft and shield will continue separate testing processes and then be re-integrated just before launch in summer 2018.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLmSU6rJUtw?t=001

Tony De La Rosa


Offline AS_501

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To anyone in the know:  Is the probe designed to withstand a major CME?  Thanks.

Online Space Ghost 1962

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Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISIS): Design
of the Energetic Particle Investigation

Describes the instruments on the then "Solar Probe Plus", and the environment they are designed to operate in.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
Parker Solar Probe Successfully Completes Pre-Environmental Testing Review
Posted on 10/13/2017 10:50:13

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, the first mission to fly into the Sun’s corona, has successfully completed a review that approves the beginning of the spacecraft’s environmental testing.

A review panel of engineers from NASA and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, where the spacecraft was designed and is being built, declared on September 29 that Parker Solar Probe has passed required performance tests and can move into environmental testing.

For Parker Solar Probe, this means the probe will be subjected to a series of challenging simulations of launch and space operations that will ensure the spacecraft is up to the difficult task of exploring the extreme environment of the Sun’s atmosphere – the corona. The spacecraft will first be bolted to a vibration table at APL, which will simulate the violent physical forces of launch; Parker Solar Probe will be lifted skyward on a Delta IV-Heavy launch vehicle, the largest in the world currently in operation. The spacecraft has already completed mass properties testing, which is important for mating to the launch vehicle and for maneuvering and attitude control.

In early November, the spacecraft will travel a short distance to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, where it will be subjected to acoustic, thermal cycling, and vacuum testing that will make sure the probe can withstand the sound generated at launch and the dramatic swings of hot and cold that it will be subjected to following launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, in summer 2018.

“It’s a testament to the hard work and diligence of the Parker Solar Probe team that we successfully completed our review, and we’re excited to move forward into environmental testing,” said Andy Driesman of APL, the Parker Solar Probe project manager. “We’re looking forward to completing these tests, and then heading to Florida to begin the preparations for next year’s launch.”

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft will explore the Sun’s outer atmosphere and make critical observations that will answer decades-old questions about the physics of stars. The resulting data will also improve forecasts of major eruptions on the sun and subsequent space weather events that impact life on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space. The mission is named for Eugene N. Parker, whose profound insights into solar physics and processes have guided the discipline.

http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Show-Article.php?articleID=49

Photo caption:

Quote
Engineers and technicians prepare the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft for mass properties testing. This marks the beginning of environmental testing, a series of physical tests that will ensure the probe can withstand the rigors of launch and temperature fluctuations of space operations.
Credit: NASA/JHUAPL

Online catdlr

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Parker Solar Probe Moves to Goddard | Time Lapse

NASA.gov Video
Published on Nov 13, 2017

Time-lapse video shows the packing up and moving of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1S98c1kQTg?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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