Author Topic: Orion Service Module  (Read 61519 times)

Offline psloss

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #160 on: 03/29/2017 12:24 PM »
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Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 1m1 minute ago

[Billl] Hill: delivery date for European Service Module for Orion “continues to erode”.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847058569635774464
Mr. Hill said it's September and that's "red" (meaning the schedule is not improving).

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #161 on: 03/29/2017 12:32 PM »
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Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 7m7 minutes ago

Hill says Airbus having problems getting vendors to supply components for the service module on time; that’s contributing to overall delay.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847061747953418240

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Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 6m6 minutes ago

Hill: software being delivered on time, but some functionality deferred from one version to the next.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847062169938210816

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #162 on: 04/07/2017 03:43 AM »
Orion and the European Service Module

Published on Apr 6, 2017

NASA’s Orion spacecraft will take astronauts to destinations at or beyond low Earth orbit. In January 2013, it was announced that ESA would provide the European Service Module (ESM) for Orion’s first uncrewed mission. Derived from ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle cargo spacecraft, the ESM will provide life support, propulsion and structural functions for Orion. In February 2017, a contract was signed for a second ESM to be used on Orion’s first crewed flight, which will carry astronauts beyond the Moon and back.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #163 on: 06/14/2017 01:27 PM »
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Set to be shipped to the USA around the New Year, ESA’s contribution to NASA’s Orion spacecraft is taking shape at Airbus in Bremen, Germany. This is no test article: the service module pictured here will fly into space by 2020, past the Moon and farther than any other human-rated spacecraft has ever flown before.

The service module will supply electricity, water, oxygen and nitrogen, propulsion and temperature control.

The blue circular frame is the support structure that holds the module as technicians work to get it ready. Yellow ties keep the 11 km of wiring in place as the thousands of components are installed and connected – the ties will be removed before flight. Behind the red support covers are the eight 490 N R-4D-11 thrusters, built by Aerojet.

Technicians are working in three shifts a day to assemble the components that are being shipped from all over Europe to complete this service module in just a few months’ time. In December it will be taken by road to Bremen airport and flown to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to meet its crew capsule.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/06/Orion_frame_work

Offline hektor

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #165 on: 08/18/2017 01:25 PM »
https://twitter.com/AirbusSpace/status/898455783930834945

"1st successful test for @NASA_Orion's propulsion module. Hot firing test starts campaign at @NASA White Sands. Info: http://bit.ly/2fPYVw8"

https://orionesm.airbusdefenceandspace.com/blog/orion-propulsion-test/

"Hot firing test mark the start of the Orion test campaign at NASA White Sands

The Propulsion Qualification Module (PQM) is a test module for Orion’s mission critical propulsion system. Currently Airbus, ESA and NASA engineers run a test campaign  at the NASA test facility in White Sands (US, New Mexico). Although the PQM and its four propellant tanks will never see space, this is an important step in the development of the Orion programme. Complex systems must first be tested and qualified on Earth before being used as flight hardware in space. The challenge in manufacturing the test tanks was therefore to satisfy the numerous technical specifications, such as cleanliness, fuel compatibility and watertightness, that will also apply to the real propulsion system.

"It is an important milestone, a huge success for the whole team and it perfectly demonstrates our engineering competence. My congratulations to the team but let’s not forget that we still have more tests to come."

Bas Theelen, Orion Programme Manager, Airbus

The flight model will have 33 engines to provide thrust and to manoeuvre the spacecraft on all axes. The test module is equipped with less engines, among them a re-used engine which last flight occurred in 2011 with Space Shuttle Atlantis (OMS–E: Orbital Manoeuvre System Engine). “I am delighted to see these first successful hot firings” says Bas Theelen, Orion Programme Manager at Airbus Space Systems.The test campaign is expected to be terminated at the end of 2017 or the beginning of 2018."
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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