Author Topic: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370  (Read 85352 times)

Offline Nomadd

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #300 on: 05/27/2014 11:38 AM »
 For one thing, It's not 4 trips through space "and back" It's just 4 trips. The BTO is just the processing time for the response.
One way travel should just be the ping time minus the BTO divided by four.
« Last Edit: 05/27/2014 11:40 AM by Nomadd »

Offline Warren Platts

For one thing, It's not 4 trips through space "and back" It's just 4 trips.

OK thanks for clearing that up....  ::)

 
Quote
The BTO is just the processing time for the response.
One way travel should just be the ping time minus the BTO divided by four.

I don't the BTO is just the processing time: it is definitely correlated with the 1-way travel time. Also, the document in the beginning says that the processing time is constant.

Also, what do you mean by "ping time"? There is a time stamp associated with the ping, but there are no durations given for ping times other than the BFO itself. In fact, I did a linear regression on the Hussein Chart ping ring lines and I get this formula:

Hussein Charts
1-way ping time = 0.116165579 + 0.546858242 * BTO

7 Data Point Graph:
 1-way ping time = 0.116932924 + 0.501092384 * BTO

Bottom line: we want a formula of the form y = a + bx. The question is what is the best way to derive this from the raw data....
« Last Edit: 05/27/2014 04:54 PM by Warren Platts »
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Offline Star One

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #302 on: 06/05/2014 06:59 PM »
Quote
The search for missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 has been moved to another area of the southern Indian Ocean dubbed "the 7th arc", after new analysis of satellite communications from the aircraft.

Australian officials confirmed the new target area after completing a search of the previous location with no sign of wreckage.

"The latest information and analysis confirms that MH370 will be found in close proximity to the arc," the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said in a statement quoted by USA Today.

"At the time MH370 reached this arc, the aircraft is considered to have exhausted its fuel and to have been descending."

The bureau stated that the plane is likely to have crashed within 60 miles of the arc, which sweeps across a huge area of the ocean. According to officials, the search will focus on a 17,500 sq m area.

The location of the 7th arc, in relation to the area already combed by a US underwater drone, is not clear. Bluefin-21, an autonomous mini-submarine, completed an unsuccessful search of the Indian Ocean seabed at the end of May, in the area originally believed to be the crash zone.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/malaysia-airlines-mh370-search-area-moved-7th-arc-154511423.html

Offline Star One

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #303 on: 08/28/2014 11:52 AM »
Quote
Australia, which is responsible for search and rescue operations, has been looking for the plane in an area about 1,800km off its west coast.

The latest detail on the plane's possible flight path came from an analysis of a failed attempted satellite phone call from Malaysia Airlines to the plane, said Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss.

"The search area remains the same, but some of the information that we now have suggests to us that areas a little further to the south... are of particular interest and priority," he told reporters in Canberra.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-28962994

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #304 on: 10/14/2014 01:38 PM »
I realize it has been a while, but Inmarsat has just released a pdf that explains what data they have and how and why they are interpreting it):
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Offline Star One

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #305 on: 08/16/2017 08:04 AM »
Anyone want to hazard a guess at the identity of the satellite here, indicated at but not named in the article.

Quote
Australia has released satellite images it says show 12 “probably man-made” objects floating in the sea near the suspected crash site of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Taken two weeks after MH370 disappeared on 8 March 2014, the photos were analysed by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB). Its researchers used drift modelling of the debris to suggest a new potential location for the crash site — a 5,000 sq km (1930 sq miles) area just north of the former search zone.

Quote
Two Australian government agencies, Geoscience Australia and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), analysed the images, which were taken by a French military satellite but not released to the public.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/16/french-images-bolster-theory-mh370-crashed-north-of-search-area

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #306 on: 08/16/2017 12:57 PM »
Well, the article said "French", so that could be Spot 5 (Was retired in 2015), Spot 6, (Spot 7 was launched June 30th of 2014) or Pleiades HR-1 or HR-2. I would vote one of the Pleiades since they are meant to be dual use.

Of course "French" could be a media catch-all for any ESA program.
« Last Edit: 08/16/2017 01:00 PM by kevin-rf »
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Offline kevin-rf

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Offline Star One

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #308 on: 08/16/2017 05:56 PM »
Wall Street journal is saying Pleiades satellites took the images.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/mh370-new-analysis-spots-objects-near-planes-likely-crash-site-1502872824

Thanks. Shame the story is behind a paywall.

Offline rolfkap

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #309 on: 08/16/2017 09:33 PM »
The report is located at:
https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2014/aair/ae-2014-054/
Specifically,
https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/5773373/mh370_satellite-imagery-geoscienceaust-report.pdf

It seems the team revised the search area in 2016 and then went back and re-looked at old satellite images.

Quote
Geoscience Australia (GA) was asked to assist the Australian Transport Safety Authority (ATSB) in the analysis of a set of four Airbus PLEIADES 1A images. GA received these images for analysis on the 23rd March 2017.
The data was acquired over the Indian Ocean on the 23rd March 2014. The analysis performed by GA was to determine whether the images included objects that were potentially man-made in origin. GA analyses included semi-automatic workflows and a number of potential objects were identified.
The overall location of the study area is shown in Figure 1, and a detailed overview of the four scenes with associated detected objects is shown in Figure 2. Figure 3 details the relationship between the PLEIADES data and other MH370 search-related activities.
The appendix to the report presents a data summary for each of the images. This includes a browse image of each scene, including the object locations, a cross plot of the representative spectral radiances observed in the image, a table of the object locations plus size metrics and an indicative label as to the object’s origin. The detected objects are shown in true colour and in a false colour derived from Principle Components Analysis (PCA) to help distinguish objects from their surroundings.

Also see the updated drift report at:
https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/5773371/mh370_csiro-ocean-drift-iiil.pdf

--Rolf

Offline catdlr

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Tony De La Rosa

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Offline Star One

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Re: Satellite technology and the location of missing plane MH370
« Reply #312 on: 08/17/2017 03:29 PM »
Follow up story.

Quote
Newly-published satellite images – captured 15 days after the disappearance – might indicate the possibility of aircraft debris, and oceanic drift modelling has pointed to a potential alternative impact zone.

Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation chief Azharuddin Abdul Rahman says the new information will be included in its examination of proposals to resume the search.

"We remain to be guided as to how this [information] can be used to assist us in identifying the specific location of the aircraft," he adds.

Abdul Rahman says the government has "received several proposals from interested parties" regarding a renewed search, and that investigators are "assessing these offers".

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/malaysia-considers-several-proposals-to-renew-mh37-440377/

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