Author Topic: Galileo Deployment.  (Read 21735 times)

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #20 on: 10/25/2014 08:15 PM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #21 on: 10/26/2014 09:51 AM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #22 on: 10/26/2014 12:30 PM »

Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.
Didn't the IOVs had issues not only with power but with one type of clock?

Offline zotiraki

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #23 on: 10/29/2014 05:01 PM »
Cost of launch on Soyuz vs Ariane 5ES seems to be close to a wash. 

ESA contract, worth 500 million euros (663 million U.S. dollars) for three Ariane-5 launchers, each carrying 4 satellies - $55.25M per sat

http://bicoltoday.com/2014/08/22/esa-signs-contract-with-arianespace-for-satellite-launch/

Contract with Arianespace covers the launch of five Soyuz launchers, each carrying two satellites. The first launch is scheduled for October 2012. The value of the contract amounts to €397 million (US$569 million). - $56.9M per satellite.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/galileo-program-feels-sharp-rise-russian-rocket-prices

Anybody have an idea when ESA will pursue the additional 6 Galileo FOC satellites?


Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #24 on: 10/29/2014 05:52 PM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

A functional satellite doesn't mean it's operational, a.k.a., can be set as healthy.

Offline SIM city

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #25 on: 10/29/2014 05:53 PM »
Not sure if that's an apples to apples comparison.  Soyuz contract seems to include adapters and any vehicle changes/upgrades for the Galileo program.  That was contracted separately for Ariane with Astrium.  And there were reservation fees back in 2012 for the right to these launches that might not be included in the 500M.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #26 on: 10/30/2014 11:29 AM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

Offline MTom

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #27 on: 10/30/2014 12:06 PM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

This is a good example how could be a project suffering with some problems darkened as would have been totally failed.
Like the Hubble troubles at the beginning. And now? Nobody questioning the results yet.
« Last Edit: 10/30/2014 12:15 PM by MTom »

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #28 on: 11/01/2014 08:29 AM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

yawn:

"for most (E1/L1-only, single-point) users, four of the six satellites are currently quite useable. Moreover, preliminary studies suggest that, once on line, the latest two satellites will be perfectly usable, despite the irregular orbits. And, as we have heard, there will be attempts to make the orbits somewhat more circular.”


Offline sdsds

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #29 on: 12/03/2014 05:28 PM »
Europe recovers wayward Galileo satellite
Reuters
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/europe-recovers-wayward-galileo-satellite-122441964.html

"The European Space Agency (ESA) said on Wednesday that the fifth satellite has now performed 11 manoeuvres over 17 days to gradually shift to a more circular orbit and will run through a series of tests over the coming days."
-- sdsds --

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #30 on: 12/03/2014 06:43 PM »
The ESA Press Release
Quote
Galileo Satellite Recovered and Transmitting Navigation Signals
3 December 2014 Europe’s fifth Galileo satellite, one of two delivered into a wrong orbit by VS09 Soyuz-Fregat launcher in August, has transmitted its first navigation signal in space on Saturday 29 November 2014. It has reached its new target orbit and its navigation payload has been successfully switched on.

A detailed test campaign is under way now the satellite has reached a more suitable orbit for navigation purposes.

Recovery

The fifth and sixth Galileo satellites, launched together on 22 August, ended up in an elongated orbit travelling up to 25 900 km above Earth and back down to 13 713 km.

A total of 11 manoeuvres were performed across 17 days, gradually nudging the fifth satellite upwards at the lowest point of its orbit.

As a result, it has risen more than 3500 km and its elliptical orbit has become more circular.

“The manoeuvres were all normal, with excellent performance both in terms of thrust and direction,” explained Daniel Navarro-Reyes, ESA Galileo mission analyst.

“The final orbit is as we targeted and is a tribute to the great professionalism of all the teams involved.”

The commands were issued from the Galileo Control Centre by Space Opal, the Galileo operator, at Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany, guided by calculations from a combined flight dynamics team of ESA’s Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany and France’s CNES space agency.

The commands were uploaded to the satellite via an extended network of ground stations, made up of Galileo stations and additional sites coordinated by France’s CNES space agency.

Satellite manufacturer OHB also provided expertise throughout the recovery, helping to adapt the flight procedures.

Until the manoeuvres started, the combined ESA–CNES team maintained the satellites pointing at the Sun using their gyroscopes and solar sensors. This kept the satellites steady in space but their navigation payloads could not be used reliably.

In the new orbit, the satellite’s radiation exposure has also been greatly reduced, ensuring reliable performance for the long term.

A suitable orbit

The revised, more circular orbit means the fifth satellite’s Earth sensor can be used continuously, keeping its main antenna oriented towards Earth and allowing its navigation payload to be switched on.

Significantly, the orbit means that it will now overfly the same location on the ground every 20 days. This compares to a normal Galileo repeat pattern of every 10 days, effectively synchronising its ground track with the rest of the Galileo constellation.

The navigation test campaign

The satellite’s navigation payload was activated on 29 November, to begin the full ‘In-Orbit Test’ campaign. This is being performed from ESA’s Redu centre in Belgium, where a 20 m-diameter antenna can study the strength and shape of the navigation signals at high resolution.

“First, the various payload elements, especially the Passive Hydrogen Maser atomic clock, were warmed up, then the payload’s first ‘signal in space’ was transmitted,” said David Sanchez-Cabezudo, managing the test campaign.

“The satellite-broadcast L-band navigation signal is monitored using the large antenna at Redu, with experts from OHB and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd – the payload manufacturer, based in Guildford, UK – also on hand to analyse how it performs over time.”

The first Galileo FOC navigation signal-in-space transmitting in the three Galileo frequency bands (E5/E6/L1) was tracked  by Galileo Test User Receivers deployed at various locations in Europe, namely at Redu (B), ESTEC (NL), Weilheim (D) and Rome (I). The quality of the signal is good and in line with expectations.

The Search And Rescue (SAR) payload will be switched on in few days in order to complement the in-orbit test campaign.

The way forward

The same recovery manoeuvres are planned for the sixth satellite, taking it into the same orbital plane but on the opposite side of Earth.

The decision whether to use the two satellites for Navigation and SAR purposes as part of the Galileo constellation will be taken by the European Commission based on the test results.

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe’s own global satellite navigation system. It will consist of 30 satellites and their ground infrastructure.

The definition phase and the development and In-Orbit Validation phase of the Galileo programme were carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) and co-funded by ESA and the European Union. This phase has created a mini-constellation of four satellites and a reduced ground segment dedicated to validating the overall concept.

The four satellites launched during the IOV phase form the core of the constellation that is being extended to reach Full Operational Capability (FOC).

The FOC phase is fully funded by the European Commission. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission.

Learn more about Galileo at: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) provides Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU. Two other Member States of the EU, Hungary and Estonia, are likely soon to become new ESA Member States.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with six other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it develops and launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more about ESA at www.esa.int

For further information, please contact:

ESA Media Relations Office

Email: media@esa.int
Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99
« Last Edit: 12/03/2014 06:45 PM by baldusi »

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #31 on: 01/22/2015 12:21 AM »
ESA ops chief Reiter: 2 Galileo sats to launch ~ March 27 on Euro Soyuz, then 2 more on Sept Soyuz & final in Dec. No 2015 Ariane 5 Galileo.

10:40am - 21 Jan 15

https://mobile.twitter.com/pbdes/status/557835190660526080

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #32 on: 09/11/2015 11:40 PM »
Excerpt from Dr. Langley's post on CANSPACE email list

Quote
    The next Galileo launch after this evening's will be in December on a Soyuz launcher when another two satellites will be placed into orbit.

    In 2016, there will be one launch but using, for the first time, the Ariane 5 launcher, to place four satellites into orbit.

    In 2017, there will be two launches: a Soyuz launch orbiting two satellites, and an Ariane 5 launch, orbiting four satellites.

    A 30-satellite constellation will be in place by 2020, following ESA's slogan "30 satellites by 2020," with 10 satellites per plane with each plane having two spare satellites. This should be feasible as two satellites are now being manufactured every three months. Twenty-four satellites is the minimum for Galileo operational capability.

Offline Prober

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #33 on: 11/15/2015 07:57 PM »
http://gizmodo.com/a-satellite-mishap-is-allowing-physicists-to-test-einst-1742536522

"Last year, a Russian Soyuz rocket accidentally placed two ESA-operated GPS satellites into elliptical, rather than circular, orbits. The faulty launch leaves the satellites unfit to perform their intended duties as part of a global Galileo GPS system. It would have been a huge waste of money and resources, but there’s a silver lining

To wit, physicists now have a unique opportunity to test one of the key predictions of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity: That clocks run more slowly when they’re close to heavy objects, because of how gravity warps the fabric of spacetime. (Remember Miller’s planet from Interstellar, where an hour is actually seven years of Earth time thanks to the monster black hole next door? Same principle)."
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Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #34 on: 11/18/2016 11:39 AM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #35 on: 11/18/2016 03:04 PM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #36 on: 11/18/2016 05:43 PM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

I think you are confusing a bit the terms:
http://www.galileoic.org/node/149
and
http://www.navipedia.net/index.php/Galileo_Future_and_Evolutions

State that they need two things for IOC: 18 satellite for sub 4m accuracy and GPS interoperability. They also state that they needed 14 FOC satellites, on top of the 4 IOV satellites, thus 18 total. They have one IOV down and two FOC in the wrong orbit. So they really needed a successful M06 to achieve IOC.
If they had had four healthy IOV and M01 had been successful, they might have had IOC. But they had too many anomalies.

Offline vyoma

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #37 on: 01/18/2017 07:38 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38664225

Quote
Across the 18 satellites now in orbit, nine clocks have stopped operating.
Three are traditional rubidium devices; six are the more precise hydrogen maser instruments that were designed to give Galileo superior performance to the American GPS network.

Quote
All 18 spacecraft currently in space continue to operate, but one of them is now down to just two clocks.
Most of the maser failures (5) have occurred on the satellites that were originally sent into orbit to validate the system, whereas all three rubidium stoppages are on the spacecraft that were subsequently launched to fill out the network.

Quote
It appears the rubidium failures "all seem to have a consistent signature, linked to probable short circuits, and possibly a particular test procedure performed on the ground".

Quote
The maser clock failures are said to be better understood, with two likely causes, the second of which has caused most grief.
The Esa statement said this second scenario was "related to the fact that when some healthy [hydrogen maser] clocks are turned off for long periods, they do not restart due to a change in clock characteristics".

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #38 on: 01/18/2017 11:40 PM »
Both payloads (Thales and SSTL) use the same clocks?

Offline vyoma

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #39 on: 01/19/2017 12:39 AM »
Looks like it:

Quote
Esa staff at its technical centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands are trying to isolate the cause the of failures - with the assistance of the clock (Spectratime of Switzerland) and satellite manufacturers (Airbus and Thales Alenia Space; OHB and SSTL). It is understood engineers have managed to restart another hydrogen clock that had stopped.

And, here's the rundown on numbers:

Quote
Galileo's atomic clocks by the numbers:

- First four satellites launched were called In Orbit Validation (IOV) platforms

- The next 14 were referred to as Full Operational Constellation (FOC) satellites

- Three of the rubidium clock failures have occurred on Galileo's FOC satellites

- Five of the hydrogen maser failures have occurred on the IOV spacecraft

- One maser has stopped on an FOC satellite, giving nine failures in total

- Three of the four IOVs are affected; two of the 14 FOC satellites are affected

- Every satellite has two hydrogen maser clocks and two rubidium clocks

- That means a total of 72 atomic clocks are currently in orbit

- All Galileo satellites presently have at least two working clocks

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