Author Topic: Galileo Deployment.  (Read 21723 times)

Offline baldusi

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Galileo Deployment.
« on: 11/02/2013 04:26 PM »
I've been looking into a consolidated Galileo launch sechedule. I've arrange this list.
I took this from the Arianespace manifest on this site. Apparently for 2014 they might be able to launch three Soyuz missions, but that depends on payload and rocket readiness. The first flight of 2014 appears on track since the payloads are waiting for the O3b launch. But the third flight seems very difficult, among other issues because of rocket availability. The Ariane 5 ES flights don't seem to have slots since Ariane 5 ECA has a very busy schedule. So it would seem to push most deployment into 2015 and 2016.
 

№ – Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)
01 - 2005-12-28 - GIOVE A - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-15) - Baikonur 31/6 - 05:19:08 (retired to graveyard orbit in June 2012)
02 - 2008-04-26 - GIOVE B - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-21) - Baikonur 31/6 - 22:16:02 (retired to graveyard orbit in July 2012)
03 - 2011-10-21 - Galileo-IOV PFM (Thijs)/Galileo-IOV FM2 (Natalia) - B plane  - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS0) - Kourou ELS - 10:30:26
04 - 2012-10-12 - Galileo-IOV FM3 (David)/Galileo-IOV FM4 (Sif) - C plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS03) -  Kourou ELS - 18:15:01
05 - 2014-08-22 - Galileo-FOC M01 FM01 (Doresa) / FM02 (Milena) - C Plane -  Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS09) - Kourou ELS (Launch Failure: Wrong Orbit)
06 - 2015-03-27 - Galileo-FOC M02 FM03 (Adam) / FM04 (Anastasia) - B Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS11) - Kourou ELS - 21:46:18.522
07 - 2015-09-11 - Galileo-FOC M03 FM05 (Alba) / FM06 (Oriana) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS12)- Kourou ELS - 02:08:12
08 - 2015-12-17 - Galileo-FOC M04 FM08 (Andriana) / FM09 (Liene) - C Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS13) -  Kourou ELS - 11:51:56
09 - 2016-05-24 - Galileo-FOC M05 FM10 (Danielè) / FM11 (Alizée) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS15) -  Kourou ELS - 08:48:43
10 - 2016-11-17 -  Galileo-FOC M06 FM07 (Antonianna)/FM12 (Lisa)/FM13 (Kimberley)/FM14 (Tijmen) - C Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA234) - Kourou ELA-3 - 13:06:55

Planned launches
№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

11 - 2017-Midyear - Galileo-FOC M07 FM15 (Nicole)/FM16 (Zofia)/FM17 (Alexandre)/FM18 (Irina) - ?? Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA2??) - Kourou ELA-3
12 - 2018-Spring - Galileo-FOC M08 FM19 (Tara)/FM20 (Samuel)/FM21 (Anna)/FM22 (Ellen) - ?? Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA2??) - Kourou ELA-3

Current constellation information can be consulted here:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information

And for orbital parameters:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/orbital-and-technical-parameters

Launch Threads:
Historical:
GIOVE-A
GIOVE-B
Galileo-IOV M01
Galileo-IOV M02
Galileo-FOC M01
Galileo-FOC M02
Galileo-FOC M03
Galileo-FOC M04
Galileo-FOC M05
Galileo-FOC M06

Future
Galileo-FOC M07
Galileo-FOC M08
« Last Edit: 11/18/2016 12:44 PM by baldusi »

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #1 on: 12/02/2013 07:46 PM »

Planned launches

№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

05 - middle 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM01 (Doresa)/Galileo-FOC FM02 (Milena) - Third plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
06 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM03 (Adam)/Galileo-FOC FM04 (Anastasia) - First plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
07 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM05 (Alba)/Galileo-FOC FM06 (Oriana) - Second plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS


According to an article here: http://www.insidegnss.com/node/3787, the mission plan in 2014 is correct.

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #2 on: 01/02/2014 10:20 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Launchers/Deploying_multiple_satellites_with_Sylda_and_Vespa

Quote
a Galileo dispenser is being developed for Ariane 5 ES. This dispenser will be able to carry and release four Galileo satellites in pairs into orbits at some 22 300 km altitude.

Image credit: ESA

Offline Langley

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #3 on: 01/11/2014 02:09 PM »
Plane and slot designations of Galileo satellites launched thus far as well as designations of active satellites in the other global navigation satellite systems can be found here:
http://gpsworld.com/the-almanac/

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #4 on: 04/14/2014 09:10 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Electric_thrusters_may_steer_Galileo_in_future

Electric thrusters may steer Galileo in future

Quote

“But for Galileo Second Generation, the satellites could potentially incorporate electric propulsion – allowing them to target themselves directly instead of relying on the upper stage.”

This would offer several advantages. Freeing up mass by doing without the upper stage means more satellites could be carried by individual rocket: up to three by Soyuz, while Ariane 5s carrying commercial telecom satellites could piggyback a quartet as secondary passengers. The lightweight Vega launchers might loft individual satellites.

At the same time, the mass of each satellite could still increase – up to 1500 kg or more from the current 700 kg. Enlarging the satellite would enable an expanded navigation payload to support a greatly extended range of Galileo services.


Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #5 on: 08/22/2014 08:50 AM »
Arianespace serves the Galileo constellation and Europe's ambitions in space with the signature of three new launch services using Ariane 5 ES
 
Kourou, August 20, 2014

Today saw Arianespace and the European Space Agency (ESA), acting on behalf of the European Commission, convene at the Guiana Space Center, European spaceport, to sign a contract for three launch services with Ariane 5 ES in order to step up the deployment of the European navigation system Galileo, the European Union’s flagship program.

The contract for Arianespace’s three Ariane 5 launches to orbit a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites was signed at the Spaceport by Chairman and CEO Stéphane Israël (seated, at left) and Didier Faivre, ESA Director of the Galileo Program and Navigation-related Activities. Joining them were ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain, and Daniel Calleja Crespo, Director General for Enterprise and Industry, European Commission.

With this new launch contract and thanks to the performance of Ariane 5 ES, a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites will be launched using three dedicated Ariane 5 ES launch-vehicles, each carrying four satellites. The Ariane 5 ES launches will take place from 2015 onwards.

http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-20-2014.asp

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #6 on: 08/22/2014 05:25 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this. If I had to bet, I guess they could do one ES towards the end of 2015, and one each on 2016 and 2017. That would leave just two more Galileo Soyuz missions (probably 2016).
But Ariane 5 schedule is really tight for 2015. But one you start to analyze the payload readiness limitations, they might have the ES stage at CSG and launch whenever the commercial payloads get a dealy (like the Optus case). The nice thing about Galileo is that they can launch basically any day, a great difference with the ISS complicated VV scheduling.

Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #7 on: 08/23/2014 06:49 PM »
A launch yesterday on Soyuz looks to have delivered two Galileo sats to the wrong orbit:-

Quote
"Observations taken after the separation of the satellites from the Soyuz VS09 (rocket) for the Galileo Mission show a gap between the orbit achieved and that which was planned," said launch service provider Arianespace, in a statement.

"They have been placed on a lower orbit than expected. Teams are studying the impact this could have on the satellites," it added.

Arianespace declined to comment on whether their trajectories could be corrected, the AFP news agency reports.

cheers, Martin

Offline Scylla

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #8 on: 08/24/2014 01:34 PM »
Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees
« Last Edit: 08/24/2014 01:42 PM by Scylla »
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Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #9 on: 08/24/2014 02:35 PM »


Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees

ISTM possible that these sats may still be able to form part of the constellation, but will only contribute for users in lower latitudes.

Given the altitude, I'd assume that users some way above 49.8 degrees would still be able to get a signal, but contribution to accuracy is reduced for lower inclinations above the horizon.

Cheers, Martin

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #10 on: 09/01/2014 10:05 AM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #11 on: 09/01/2014 01:06 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #12 on: 09/01/2014 01:38 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #13 on: 09/01/2014 02:22 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #14 on: 09/01/2014 02:32 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?


Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #15 on: 09/01/2014 04:40 PM »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #16 on: 09/14/2014 07:54 PM »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.


Thank you so much.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #17 on: 09/22/2014 06:44 PM »
The current status of various Galileo Foc satellites.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #18 on: 10/24/2014 05:53 PM »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #19 on: 10/25/2014 08:45 AM »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

And that voice is very VERY wrong.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #20 on: 10/25/2014 08:15 PM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #21 on: 10/26/2014 09:51 AM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #22 on: 10/26/2014 12:30 PM »

Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.
Didn't the IOVs had issues not only with power but with one type of clock?

Offline zotiraki

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #23 on: 10/29/2014 05:01 PM »
Cost of launch on Soyuz vs Ariane 5ES seems to be close to a wash. 

ESA contract, worth 500 million euros (663 million U.S. dollars) for three Ariane-5 launchers, each carrying 4 satellies - $55.25M per sat

http://bicoltoday.com/2014/08/22/esa-signs-contract-with-arianespace-for-satellite-launch/

Contract with Arianespace covers the launch of five Soyuz launchers, each carrying two satellites. The first launch is scheduled for October 2012. The value of the contract amounts to €397 million (US$569 million). - $56.9M per satellite.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/galileo-program-feels-sharp-rise-russian-rocket-prices

Anybody have an idea when ESA will pursue the additional 6 Galileo FOC satellites?


Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #24 on: 10/29/2014 05:52 PM »
Then how is the correct voice like?

all 6 are functional, IOV has 4, all operational, with 1 on less power, FOC has 2 functional but with part of the payload switched off until in better orbit.

A functional satellite doesn't mean it's operational, a.k.a., can be set as healthy.

Offline SIM city

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #25 on: 10/29/2014 05:53 PM »
Not sure if that's an apples to apples comparison.  Soyuz contract seems to include adapters and any vehicle changes/upgrades for the Galileo program.  That was contracted separately for Ariane with Astrium.  And there were reservation fees back in 2012 for the right to these launches that might not be included in the 500M.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #26 on: 10/30/2014 11:29 AM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

Offline MTom

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #27 on: 10/30/2014 12:06 PM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

This is a good example how could be a project suffering with some problems darkened as would have been totally failed.
Like the Hubble troubles at the beginning. And now? Nobody questioning the results yet.
« Last Edit: 10/30/2014 12:15 PM by MTom »

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #28 on: 11/01/2014 08:29 AM »
An interesting article from GPS World - Galileo: A Constellation of One?
http://gpsworld.com/galileo-a-constellation-of-one/

yawn:

"for most (E1/L1-only, single-point) users, four of the six satellites are currently quite useable. Moreover, preliminary studies suggest that, once on line, the latest two satellites will be perfectly usable, despite the irregular orbits. And, as we have heard, there will be attempts to make the orbits somewhat more circular.”


Offline sdsds

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #29 on: 12/03/2014 05:28 PM »
Europe recovers wayward Galileo satellite
Reuters
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/europe-recovers-wayward-galileo-satellite-122441964.html

"The European Space Agency (ESA) said on Wednesday that the fifth satellite has now performed 11 manoeuvres over 17 days to gradually shift to a more circular orbit and will run through a series of tests over the coming days."
-- sdsds --

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #30 on: 12/03/2014 06:43 PM »
The ESA Press Release
Quote
Galileo Satellite Recovered and Transmitting Navigation Signals
3 December 2014 Europe’s fifth Galileo satellite, one of two delivered into a wrong orbit by VS09 Soyuz-Fregat launcher in August, has transmitted its first navigation signal in space on Saturday 29 November 2014. It has reached its new target orbit and its navigation payload has been successfully switched on.

A detailed test campaign is under way now the satellite has reached a more suitable orbit for navigation purposes.

Recovery

The fifth and sixth Galileo satellites, launched together on 22 August, ended up in an elongated orbit travelling up to 25 900 km above Earth and back down to 13 713 km.

A total of 11 manoeuvres were performed across 17 days, gradually nudging the fifth satellite upwards at the lowest point of its orbit.

As a result, it has risen more than 3500 km and its elliptical orbit has become more circular.

“The manoeuvres were all normal, with excellent performance both in terms of thrust and direction,” explained Daniel Navarro-Reyes, ESA Galileo mission analyst.

“The final orbit is as we targeted and is a tribute to the great professionalism of all the teams involved.”

The commands were issued from the Galileo Control Centre by Space Opal, the Galileo operator, at Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany, guided by calculations from a combined flight dynamics team of ESA’s Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany and France’s CNES space agency.

The commands were uploaded to the satellite via an extended network of ground stations, made up of Galileo stations and additional sites coordinated by France’s CNES space agency.

Satellite manufacturer OHB also provided expertise throughout the recovery, helping to adapt the flight procedures.

Until the manoeuvres started, the combined ESA–CNES team maintained the satellites pointing at the Sun using their gyroscopes and solar sensors. This kept the satellites steady in space but their navigation payloads could not be used reliably.

In the new orbit, the satellite’s radiation exposure has also been greatly reduced, ensuring reliable performance for the long term.

A suitable orbit

The revised, more circular orbit means the fifth satellite’s Earth sensor can be used continuously, keeping its main antenna oriented towards Earth and allowing its navigation payload to be switched on.

Significantly, the orbit means that it will now overfly the same location on the ground every 20 days. This compares to a normal Galileo repeat pattern of every 10 days, effectively synchronising its ground track with the rest of the Galileo constellation.

The navigation test campaign

The satellite’s navigation payload was activated on 29 November, to begin the full ‘In-Orbit Test’ campaign. This is being performed from ESA’s Redu centre in Belgium, where a 20 m-diameter antenna can study the strength and shape of the navigation signals at high resolution.

“First, the various payload elements, especially the Passive Hydrogen Maser atomic clock, were warmed up, then the payload’s first ‘signal in space’ was transmitted,” said David Sanchez-Cabezudo, managing the test campaign.

“The satellite-broadcast L-band navigation signal is monitored using the large antenna at Redu, with experts from OHB and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd – the payload manufacturer, based in Guildford, UK – also on hand to analyse how it performs over time.”

The first Galileo FOC navigation signal-in-space transmitting in the three Galileo frequency bands (E5/E6/L1) was tracked  by Galileo Test User Receivers deployed at various locations in Europe, namely at Redu (B), ESTEC (NL), Weilheim (D) and Rome (I). The quality of the signal is good and in line with expectations.

The Search And Rescue (SAR) payload will be switched on in few days in order to complement the in-orbit test campaign.

The way forward

The same recovery manoeuvres are planned for the sixth satellite, taking it into the same orbital plane but on the opposite side of Earth.

The decision whether to use the two satellites for Navigation and SAR purposes as part of the Galileo constellation will be taken by the European Commission based on the test results.

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe’s own global satellite navigation system. It will consist of 30 satellites and their ground infrastructure.

The definition phase and the development and In-Orbit Validation phase of the Galileo programme were carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) and co-funded by ESA and the European Union. This phase has created a mini-constellation of four satellites and a reduced ground segment dedicated to validating the overall concept.

The four satellites launched during the IOV phase form the core of the constellation that is being extended to reach Full Operational Capability (FOC).

The FOC phase is fully funded by the European Commission. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission.

Learn more about Galileo at: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) provides Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU. Two other Member States of the EU, Hungary and Estonia, are likely soon to become new ESA Member States.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with six other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it develops and launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more about ESA at www.esa.int

For further information, please contact:

ESA Media Relations Office

Email: media@esa.int
Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99
« Last Edit: 12/03/2014 06:45 PM by baldusi »

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #31 on: 01/22/2015 12:21 AM »
ESA ops chief Reiter: 2 Galileo sats to launch ~ March 27 on Euro Soyuz, then 2 more on Sept Soyuz & final in Dec. No 2015 Ariane 5 Galileo.

10:40am - 21 Jan 15

https://mobile.twitter.com/pbdes/status/557835190660526080

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #32 on: 09/11/2015 11:40 PM »
Excerpt from Dr. Langley's post on CANSPACE email list

Quote
    The next Galileo launch after this evening's will be in December on a Soyuz launcher when another two satellites will be placed into orbit.

    In 2016, there will be one launch but using, for the first time, the Ariane 5 launcher, to place four satellites into orbit.

    In 2017, there will be two launches: a Soyuz launch orbiting two satellites, and an Ariane 5 launch, orbiting four satellites.

    A 30-satellite constellation will be in place by 2020, following ESA's slogan "30 satellites by 2020," with 10 satellites per plane with each plane having two spare satellites. This should be feasible as two satellites are now being manufactured every three months. Twenty-four satellites is the minimum for Galileo operational capability.

Offline Prober

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #33 on: 11/15/2015 07:57 PM »
http://gizmodo.com/a-satellite-mishap-is-allowing-physicists-to-test-einst-1742536522

"Last year, a Russian Soyuz rocket accidentally placed two ESA-operated GPS satellites into elliptical, rather than circular, orbits. The faulty launch leaves the satellites unfit to perform their intended duties as part of a global Galileo GPS system. It would have been a huge waste of money and resources, but there’s a silver lining

To wit, physicists now have a unique opportunity to test one of the key predictions of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity: That clocks run more slowly when they’re close to heavy objects, because of how gravity warps the fabric of spacetime. (Remember Miller’s planet from Interstellar, where an hour is actually seven years of Earth time thanks to the monster black hole next door? Same principle)."
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #34 on: 11/18/2016 11:39 AM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #35 on: 11/18/2016 03:04 PM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #36 on: 11/18/2016 05:43 PM »
With Galileo-FOC M06, the 18 satellites necessary for IOC are now in orbit. For some reason, even though M06 has already put four new satllites on orbit, FM08 (Andriana) and FM09 (Liene) are still not commissioned into service. If they take more than six months to commission, IOC might end up in the second half of 2017.

The europeans can declare a Galileo IOC with only 14, not 18 satellites.

I think you are confusing a bit the terms:
http://www.galileoic.org/node/149
and
http://www.navipedia.net/index.php/Galileo_Future_and_Evolutions

State that they need two things for IOC: 18 satellite for sub 4m accuracy and GPS interoperability. They also state that they needed 14 FOC satellites, on top of the 4 IOV satellites, thus 18 total. They have one IOV down and two FOC in the wrong orbit. So they really needed a successful M06 to achieve IOC.
If they had had four healthy IOV and M01 had been successful, they might have had IOC. But they had too many anomalies.

Offline vyoma

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #37 on: 01/18/2017 07:38 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38664225

Quote
Across the 18 satellites now in orbit, nine clocks have stopped operating.
Three are traditional rubidium devices; six are the more precise hydrogen maser instruments that were designed to give Galileo superior performance to the American GPS network.

Quote
All 18 spacecraft currently in space continue to operate, but one of them is now down to just two clocks.
Most of the maser failures (5) have occurred on the satellites that were originally sent into orbit to validate the system, whereas all three rubidium stoppages are on the spacecraft that were subsequently launched to fill out the network.

Quote
It appears the rubidium failures "all seem to have a consistent signature, linked to probable short circuits, and possibly a particular test procedure performed on the ground".

Quote
The maser clock failures are said to be better understood, with two likely causes, the second of which has caused most grief.
The Esa statement said this second scenario was "related to the fact that when some healthy [hydrogen maser] clocks are turned off for long periods, they do not restart due to a change in clock characteristics".

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #38 on: 01/18/2017 11:40 PM »
Both payloads (Thales and SSTL) use the same clocks?

Offline vyoma

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #39 on: 01/19/2017 12:39 AM »
Looks like it:

Quote
Esa staff at its technical centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands are trying to isolate the cause the of failures - with the assistance of the clock (Spectratime of Switzerland) and satellite manufacturers (Airbus and Thales Alenia Space; OHB and SSTL). It is understood engineers have managed to restart another hydrogen clock that had stopped.

And, here's the rundown on numbers:

Quote
Galileo's atomic clocks by the numbers:

- First four satellites launched were called In Orbit Validation (IOV) platforms

- The next 14 were referred to as Full Operational Constellation (FOC) satellites

- Three of the rubidium clock failures have occurred on Galileo's FOC satellites

- Five of the hydrogen maser failures have occurred on the IOV spacecraft

- One maser has stopped on an FOC satellite, giving nine failures in total

- Three of the four IOVs are affected; two of the 14 FOC satellites are affected

- Every satellite has two hydrogen maser clocks and two rubidium clocks

- That means a total of 72 atomic clocks are currently in orbit

- All Galileo satellites presently have at least two working clocks

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #40 on: 06/10/2017 12:40 PM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo/Launching_Galileo/Galileo_grows_two_more_satellites_join_working_constellation

Quote
Two further satellites have formally become part of Europe’s Galileo satnav system, broadcasting timing and navigation signals worldwide while also picking up distress calls across the planet.

These are the 15th and 16th satellites to join the network, two of the four Galileos that were launched together by Ariane 5 on 17 November, and the first additions to the working constellation since the start of Galileo Initial Services on 15 December.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #41 on: 06/22/2017 08:28 PM »
ESA and the European Commission awarding the Bremen-based satellite producer a contract for a further eight navigation satellites

Bremen, Paris, June 22, 2017. OHB System AG was awarded a contract to produce additional eight navigation satellites for the Galileo programme.
Signed today, the contract is worth EUR 324 million. This will increase the number of Galileo FOC satellites supplied by OHB to a total of 30, of which the first 14 are already in orbit.

“This procurement from OHB will enable to complete the Galileo constellation and have reserves both in-obit and on-ground. The 30 satellites added to the 4 IOV satellites now bring the necessary infrastructure robustness that is essential for the provision of Galileo services world-wide. We are looking forward to work once more with OHB in the next phase” stated Paul Verhoef, ESA’s Director of Satellite Navigation.

“I am very pleased that after delivering 22 satellites under the first two contracts OHB has now also retained the confidence of ESA and the European Commission in the third bid. We are proud of being able to make such a crucial contribution to this major European project that will be providing so many people around the world with valuable services,” said Marco Fuchs, CEO of OHB-System AG, after signing the contract in Paris on June 22nd, 2017.

Continuation of the proven satellite design
“Our modular satellite design is outstanding and has proven itself with superb results. A large part of the satellites that we have already assembled have demonstrated their full functional capability in space. For this reason, there will be no major changes to the design of the eight new satellites. At this stage, we are working on the basis of a first launch date in 2020,” says Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, director of navigation at OHB System AG, who previously oversaw the development of the first and second satellite batch.
In its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager, OHB is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification.

Successful partnerships to be continued
OHB will be able to rely on proven partnerships and subcontractors. As with the previous two contracts, the OHB UK partner Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) has contributed also to this successful offer with the navigation payloads.
Management Board member Dr. Ingo Engeln, who is responsible for OHB System AG’s institutional space projects, is pleased to be able to continue production of the satellites. “Our proven processes and structures, the seven assembly islands in Bremen, the corresponding facilities at the other integration and testing sites and, not least of all, the highly trained teams at participating companies provide an ideal basis for expanding the satellite constellation swiftly.” This together with the modular design of the satellites will ensure that a pair of two satellites can be delivered within three months after the pair of satellites delivered before.

Shaping the future
Obviously, OHB wants to continue contributing to this beneficial project in the future. In Bremen, it is already working on designs for the next-generation Galileo satellites. In various studies for ESA, the engineers are exploring new materials and components and further services to be provided by the next generation. Needless to say, they are incorporating the experience gained from engineering and producing the previous navigation satellites. In this way, OHB can contribute proposals for the design of the next-generation satellites and offer the customer the benefits of the unique experience that it has gained from the successful first series.

from left to right  W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA
from left to right W. Paetsch, Director Navigation of OHB System AG, P. Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of DG-Growth, European Commission, M. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, J. Woerner, Director General ESA, P. Verhoef, Director of Navigation, ESA

Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE
Galileo FOC satellites undergoing testing at a cleanroom at the space center in Kourou, French-Guyana. © ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE

Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.
Four Galileo FOC satellites developed and built by OHB were successfully placed in orbit on board an Ariane 5 ES launcher on November 17, 2016.

https://www.ohb-system.de/press-releases-details/serial-success-ohb-wins-third-tender-for-galileo-satellites.html

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #42 on: 08/19/2017 06:45 AM »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #43 on: 09/16/2017 12:09 AM »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat
One on a Vega-C costs 35mln if I'm not mistaken.
The single Sat on Vega-C should the most expensive launch option per satellite.

Two on A62 is a waist of money. This is EU funded, so paid by European citizens via taxes. My opinion is that wasting public money is very bad. (Also US government launched procurement, from all companies.)

The disadvantages of launching four at a time instead of two are:
1) launch rate goes down from 1/year to 1/2years (24x Galileo satellites with 12year service live.)
2) production and processing is more demanding (2sats/year vs. 4sats/2year

There is a second reason I'm against using A6 to launch FOC Sat 23-26. Using A6 would keen that the Galileo  system wouldn't contain 24 sats until after 2020. (4xIOC + 22×FOC - 2x FOC wrong orbit, - 1x defect = 23 after 2018.
They should order another (4th) A5ES Galileo for FOC 23-26 with a launch date in 2019. Or dual Soyuz or a single Vega-C launch during 2019.

Offline calapine

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #44 on: 09/16/2017 04:51 AM »
Before we start a debate:

Is it sure that Vega-C will be able to launch a single Galileo at all?
Same question regarding Ariane 62 and quad-launches

I'm a bit sceptical of both to be honest.


Offline Mike Jones

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #45 on: 09/16/2017 05:54 AM »
Vega C was targeted at 35 M€ (not dollars) and lacks performance in its current version to even launch a single Galileo sat to MEO @ 22000km.

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #46 on: 09/16/2017 11:42 AM »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2017 11:43 AM by Skyrocket »

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #47 on: 09/16/2017 11:24 PM »
I'm a bit upset by the news that two Ariane 62 launchers have been ordered to launch two Galileo-satellites each.
Inside the presentations from the Industry days, it is stated that launch service cost for A62 will be 85mln $; and for A64 130mln.
A Vega-C could also orbit a single Galileo-satellite, this launch will cost about 35mln.
My opinion is; that dual Galileo-satellite launch on A62 will be to expansive.
They should launch 4x Galileo-satellites on each A62, if that's not possible, Launch 4x on A64 or one on Vega-C.
2x on A62 @85mln = 42.5mln/Sat
4x on A62 @85mln = 21.5mln/Sat
4x on A64 @130mln=26.5mln/Sat

The launch performance for A62 to the Galileo orbit is about 1700 kg according to the users guide. A quadruple Galileo launch on a A62 is therefore not possible.
launching one of the first gen Galileo sats on Vega Family is not possible due to the deployment architecture being designed only to launch in pairs and and quads. If launching one on Vega it would require asymmetrical mounting with moveable ballast as at sep the upper stages center of gravity would shift to the side opposite of the satellites location and would induct an end over end spin preventing the CCAM and deorbit maneuvers.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #48 on: 10/05/2017 10:24 PM »
New contract award for OHB: European Commission orders a further four Galileo satellites

Bremen, October 5, 2017


The European Commission has exercised one of its contractual options for the European Galileo navigation system and ordered a further four satellites from OHB System AG. As recently as in June 2017, the Bremen-based satellite producer had been awarded a contract for eight Galileo FOC*) satellites under the Batch 3 tender. “Once again, the quality of our navigation satellites has spoken for itself. I am very grateful to the European Commission and the European Space Agency ESA for the confidence which they have placed in us and our partners,” says Marco Fuchs, Chief Executive Officer of OHB SE.

“Following the completion of the satellites under the contract awarded in June, we will be commencing work seamlessly on the four satellites under the new contract. The ambitious schedule means that looking forward reserve satellites will be available both in orbit and on the ground,” adds Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, who is the member of the OHB System AG Management Board responsible for navigation, Earth observation and science.

The contract for the four satellites has a value of EUR 157.75 million. As with the previous contracts, OHB System AG in its capacity as the producer of the satellite platform and the system manager is responsible for the satellite design and platform, integration and verification. In addition, it will be providing support during the launch preparations and in-orbit verification. The contract increases the total number of Galileo satellites ordered from OHB System AG to 34. Of these, 14 are already in orbit. The satellite constellation is to be expanded incrementally.

Assembly work on the Ariane 6 launcher to commence in October
With a mass of 750 kilograms each, the Batch 3 satellites will be placed in their respective orbit approximately 23,000 kilometers above the surface of the Earth by Ariane 6 2 launchers. MT Aerospace AG, a subsidiary of OHB SE, is the largest supplier for the Ariane program outside the Ariane group. The Augsburg-based company supplies almost all of the tank and structural components for the new launcher. “Production will be commencing at the beginning of 2018 at the new halls built for this purpose in Augsburg,” says Hans J. Steininger, Chief Executive Officer of MT Aerospace AG. “We will be starting work on completing the upper stage tanks for the Ariane 6 at the MT hall at Bremen airport in the near future. With a floor area of 4,000 square meters, the hall has been specially built for this purpose.”

About the Galileo system
The European Galileo satellite navigation system will offer people in Europe and around the world numerous positioning, navigation and timekeeping services. Under the tender for Batch 3 in June 2017, a contract for the delivery of eight satellites was awarded to OHB System AG, followed now by a further four satellites, bringing to 26 the total of satellites produced to date. Of these,18 are currently in orbit. Preliminary Galileo services went live on December 15, 2016 in a preliminary step towards full operational mode. The constellation is to be expanded with the addition of further satellites. This incrementally increases the capabilities and global availability of the system.
More information on Galileo can be found on the ESA website at: http://www.esa.int/esasearch?q=Galileo&r=lokale_nachrichten_deutschland
and http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation

*) The Full Operational Capability phase of the Galileo program is managed and fully funded by the European Union. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. The views expressed in this Press Release can in no way be taken to reflect the opinion of the European Union and/or ESA. “Galileo” is a trademark subject to OHIM application number 002742237 by EU and ESA.

For further Information please contact:

Julia Riedl
Corporate Communications
Phone: +49 8153 4002 249
Fax: +49 8153 4002 99 249
E-Mail: pr@ohb.de

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