Author Topic: Galileo Deployment.  (Read 21747 times)

Offline baldusi

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Galileo Deployment.
« on: 11/02/2013 04:26 PM »
I've been looking into a consolidated Galileo launch sechedule. I've arrange this list.
I took this from the Arianespace manifest on this site. Apparently for 2014 they might be able to launch three Soyuz missions, but that depends on payload and rocket readiness. The first flight of 2014 appears on track since the payloads are waiting for the O3b launch. But the third flight seems very difficult, among other issues because of rocket availability. The Ariane 5 ES flights don't seem to have slots since Ariane 5 ECA has a very busy schedule. So it would seem to push most deployment into 2015 and 2016.
 

№ – Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)
01 - 2005-12-28 - GIOVE A - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-15) - Baikonur 31/6 - 05:19:08 (retired to graveyard orbit in June 2012)
02 - 2008-04-26 - GIOVE B - Test plane - Soyuz-FG/Fregat (ST-21) - Baikonur 31/6 - 22:16:02 (retired to graveyard orbit in July 2012)
03 - 2011-10-21 - Galileo-IOV PFM (Thijs)/Galileo-IOV FM2 (Natalia) - B plane  - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS0) - Kourou ELS - 10:30:26
04 - 2012-10-12 - Galileo-IOV FM3 (David)/Galileo-IOV FM4 (Sif) - C plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS03) -  Kourou ELS - 18:15:01
05 - 2014-08-22 - Galileo-FOC M01 FM01 (Doresa) / FM02 (Milena) - C Plane -  Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS09) - Kourou ELS (Launch Failure: Wrong Orbit)
06 - 2015-03-27 - Galileo-FOC M02 FM03 (Adam) / FM04 (Anastasia) - B Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS11) - Kourou ELS - 21:46:18.522
07 - 2015-09-11 - Galileo-FOC M03 FM05 (Alba) / FM06 (Oriana) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS12)- Kourou ELS - 02:08:12
08 - 2015-12-17 - Galileo-FOC M04 FM08 (Andriana) / FM09 (Liene) - C Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS13) -  Kourou ELS - 11:51:56
09 - 2016-05-24 - Galileo-FOC M05 FM10 (Danielè) / FM11 (Alizée) - A Plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS15) -  Kourou ELS - 08:48:43
10 - 2016-11-17 -  Galileo-FOC M06 FM07 (Antonianna)/FM12 (Lisa)/FM13 (Kimberley)/FM14 (Tijmen) - C Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA234) - Kourou ELA-3 - 13:06:55

Planned launches
№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

11 - 2017-Midyear - Galileo-FOC M07 FM15 (Nicole)/FM16 (Zofia)/FM17 (Alexandre)/FM18 (Irina) - ?? Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA2??) - Kourou ELA-3
12 - 2018-Spring - Galileo-FOC M08 FM19 (Tara)/FM20 (Samuel)/FM21 (Anna)/FM22 (Ellen) - ?? Plane - Ariane 5 ES (VA2??) - Kourou ELA-3

Current constellation information can be consulted here:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information

And for orbital parameters:
http://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/orbital-and-technical-parameters

Launch Threads:
Historical:
GIOVE-A
GIOVE-B
Galileo-IOV M01
Galileo-IOV M02
Galileo-FOC M01
Galileo-FOC M02
Galileo-FOC M03
Galileo-FOC M04
Galileo-FOC M05
Galileo-FOC M06

Future
Galileo-FOC M07
Galileo-FOC M08
« Last Edit: 11/18/2016 12:44 PM by baldusi »

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #1 on: 12/02/2013 07:46 PM »

Planned launches

№ - Date - Satellite(s) - Orbital Plane - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

05 - middle 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM01 (Doresa)/Galileo-FOC FM02 (Milena) - Third plane - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
06 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM03 (Adam)/Galileo-FOC FM04 (Anastasia) - First plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS
07 - 2014 - Galileo-FOC FM05 (Alba)/Galileo-FOC FM06 (Oriana) - Second plane? - Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT (VS??) -  Kourou ELS


According to an article here: http://www.insidegnss.com/node/3787, the mission plan in 2014 is correct.

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #2 on: 01/02/2014 10:20 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Launchers/Deploying_multiple_satellites_with_Sylda_and_Vespa

Quote
a Galileo dispenser is being developed for Ariane 5 ES. This dispenser will be able to carry and release four Galileo satellites in pairs into orbits at some 22 300 km altitude.

Image credit: ESA

Offline Langley

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #3 on: 01/11/2014 02:09 PM »
Plane and slot designations of Galileo satellites launched thus far as well as designations of active satellites in the other global navigation satellite systems can be found here:
http://gpsworld.com/the-almanac/

Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #4 on: 04/14/2014 09:10 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Electric_thrusters_may_steer_Galileo_in_future

Electric thrusters may steer Galileo in future

Quote

“But for Galileo Second Generation, the satellites could potentially incorporate electric propulsion – allowing them to target themselves directly instead of relying on the upper stage.”

This would offer several advantages. Freeing up mass by doing without the upper stage means more satellites could be carried by individual rocket: up to three by Soyuz, while Ariane 5s carrying commercial telecom satellites could piggyback a quartet as secondary passengers. The lightweight Vega launchers might loft individual satellites.

At the same time, the mass of each satellite could still increase – up to 1500 kg or more from the current 700 kg. Enlarging the satellite would enable an expanded navigation payload to support a greatly extended range of Galileo services.


Offline bolun

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #5 on: 08/22/2014 08:50 AM »
Arianespace serves the Galileo constellation and Europe's ambitions in space with the signature of three new launch services using Ariane 5 ES
 
Kourou, August 20, 2014

Today saw Arianespace and the European Space Agency (ESA), acting on behalf of the European Commission, convene at the Guiana Space Center, European spaceport, to sign a contract for three launch services with Ariane 5 ES in order to step up the deployment of the European navigation system Galileo, the European Union’s flagship program.

The contract for Arianespace’s three Ariane 5 launches to orbit a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites was signed at the Spaceport by Chairman and CEO Stéphane Israël (seated, at left) and Didier Faivre, ESA Director of the Galileo Program and Navigation-related Activities. Joining them were ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain, and Daniel Calleja Crespo, Director General for Enterprise and Industry, European Commission.

With this new launch contract and thanks to the performance of Ariane 5 ES, a total of 12 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites will be launched using three dedicated Ariane 5 ES launch-vehicles, each carrying four satellites. The Ariane 5 ES launches will take place from 2015 onwards.

http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-20-2014.asp

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #6 on: 08/22/2014 05:25 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this. If I had to bet, I guess they could do one ES towards the end of 2015, and one each on 2016 and 2017. That would leave just two more Galileo Soyuz missions (probably 2016).
But Ariane 5 schedule is really tight for 2015. But one you start to analyze the payload readiness limitations, they might have the ES stage at CSG and launch whenever the commercial payloads get a dealy (like the Optus case). The nice thing about Galileo is that they can launch basically any day, a great difference with the ISS complicated VV scheduling.

Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #7 on: 08/23/2014 06:49 PM »
A launch yesterday on Soyuz looks to have delivered two Galileo sats to the wrong orbit:-

Quote
"Observations taken after the separation of the satellites from the Soyuz VS09 (rocket) for the Galileo Mission show a gap between the orbit achieved and that which was planned," said launch service provider Arianespace, in a statement.

"They have been placed on a lower orbit than expected. Teams are studying the impact this could have on the satellites," it added.

Arianespace declined to comment on whether their trajectories could be corrected, the AFP news agency reports.

cheers, Martin

Offline Scylla

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #8 on: 08/24/2014 01:34 PM »
Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees
« Last Edit: 08/24/2014 01:42 PM by Scylla »
I reject your reality and substitute my own--Doctor Who

Offline MP99

Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #9 on: 08/24/2014 02:35 PM »


Press Release

Galileo satellites experience orbital injection anomaly on Soyuz launch: Initial report
Kourou, August 23, 2014
http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2014/8-23-2014.asp

Quote
The targeted orbit was circular, inclined at 55 degrees with a semi major axis of 29,900 kilometers. The satellites are now in an elliptical orbit, with excentricity of 0.23, a semi major axis of 26,200 km and inclined at 49.8 degrees

ISTM possible that these sats may still be able to form part of the constellation, but will only contribute for users in lower latitudes.

Given the altitude, I'd assume that users some way above 49.8 degrees would still be able to get a signal, but contribution to accuracy is reduced for lower inclinations above the horizon.

Cheers, Martin

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #10 on: 09/01/2014 10:05 AM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #11 on: 09/01/2014 01:06 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #12 on: 09/01/2014 01:38 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #13 on: 09/01/2014 02:22 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #14 on: 09/01/2014 02:32 PM »
The article talks abut 6 to 8 birds per year. And I seriously doubt they can do an ES mission on 2015 with the sort of schedule pressure that they have on Ariane 5. Unless they have their "institutional" slot from the ATV moved to this.

I thought ATV-5 was the last, so there wouldn't be an ATV mission slot in 2015?
I should have said that they have kept their "institutional" slot now that the ATV project ended. In other words, may be they decided to keep one ES launch per year and switched payloads to Galileo.


Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?


Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #15 on: 09/01/2014 04:40 PM »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.

Offline floss

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #16 on: 09/14/2014 07:54 PM »
Will somebody please tell me what is the bottlenecks to increased flight rate ?
Do you mean within Galileo deployment or for Ariane 5 in general?
Gallileo deployment only a general increase will not get funding without a major political decision.
I don't have inside information, but they have had a lot of issues this year. Ariane-5 was seriously delayed because of the Optus-10 issues, and it already brought some delay from payload issues on 2013. So there's a lot of backlog. On the other hand, ESA pays a hefty subsidy and I imagine that they can reserve their slot for the ES.
Normally Ariane-5 have a 24 month lead time. And the contract for the three ES was signed just last month, but they had done a lot of integration work previously, and they had already signed a framework agreement that included Soyuz and Ariane-5. Thus, I'd guess that this was just rubber stamping what they were working on previously. As I said before, I don't have any insight, but I would hazard a guess that ES won't be a schedule issue (save delays of the previous mission).
Regarding Soyuz/Fregat, they are currently in stand down. It will take at least a couple of months before the combo is cleared for flight. If the thruster failure was a physical one, they might have to send the current Fregat back and get a new one, which might add some time. I would expect between 3 and 6 month delays on the Soyuz/Fregat schedule.
On the other hand, while current orbit of FOC M1 is outside of the Galileo allowed specification, it's perfectly good for satellite validation. Thus, the payload issues should be worked out and the only delay should be for the Soyuz segment. I don't expect an additional ES because the Soyuz is much cheaper.
I also expect that ESA will make an additional 6 satellite buy to replenish the fleet. But that's pure speculation on my part.


Thank you so much.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #17 on: 09/22/2014 06:44 PM »
The current status of various Galileo Foc satellites.

Offline beidou

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #18 on: 10/24/2014 05:53 PM »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

Offline Jester

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Re: Galileo Deployment.
« Reply #19 on: 10/25/2014 08:45 AM »
Quote
One voice close to the action says, “The problems of Galileo are not within the power of the Commissioner. At present, out of six satellites in orbit, only one is truly functional. Next launch, of two with Soyuz, could be in February, followed by an Arianne 5 launch in September-October [2015]. So, we’ve lost two full years — 2013 and 2014.”
http://www.insidegnss.com/node/4254

And that voice is very VERY wrong.

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