Author Topic: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012  (Read 9642 times)

Offline AnalogMan

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Upcoming parachute drop test:

Team conducts final preparations for airdrop test
Orion Monthly Accomplishments, June 2012

The parachute team continues preparation activities for the next major airdrop test on July 18 at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona. The test will be conducted using the parachute test vehicle (PTV) representing the Orion Spacecraft capsule and will examine the effects of one main parachute skipping their first reefing stage. Recent accomplishments included installation and final checkout of carriage platform separation system pyrotechnics and avionics, installation of the PTV programmer parachute and final checkout of PTV avionics. Pictured are the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) test build-up team in Arizona.

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/667374main_orion_june_2012.pdf

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #1 on: 07/17/2012 08:59 PM »
@NASA_Orion
The Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV) is loaded onto a C-17 plane in advance of Wednesday's drop test

Offline Alpha Control

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #2 on: 07/17/2012 10:07 PM »
Thanks for the photos. Will be exciting to see!
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Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #3 on: 07/18/2012 02:32 PM »
One minute ago:

@NASA_Orion
5 minutes to drop. The C17 ramp is open and the Parachute Test Vehicle is ready to deploy

Online Chris Bergin

Orion Spacecraft ‏@NASA_Orion
The parachute test vehicle has been released from the C17 (just now)

Online Chris Bergin

Orion Spacecraft ‏@NASA_Orion
CPAS just completed the EDU-A-CDT-3-5 (PTV-2) airdrop test. All visuals indicate a nominal parachute test.

Offline lbiderman

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #6 on: 07/18/2012 06:11 PM »
Great pic!
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Offline catdlr

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #7 on: 07/18/2012 09:07 PM »
Orion Parachute Test, July 18

Published on Jul 18, 2012 by ReelNASA
NASA completed another successful test Wednesday of the Orion crew vehicle's parachutes high above the Arizona desert in preparation for the spacecraft's orbital flight test in 2014. Orion will carry astronauts deeper into space than ever before, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and ensure a safe re-entry and landing.

A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona. This test was the second to use an Orion craft that mimics the full size and shape of the spacecraft.

Orion's drogue chutes were deployed between 15,000 feet and 20,000 feet, followed by the pilot parachutes, which deployed the main landing parachutes. Orion descended about 25 feet per second, well below its maximum designed touchdown speed, when it landed on the desert floor.

"Across the country, NASA and industry are moving forward on the most advanced spacecraft ever designed, conducting drop and splashdown tests, preparing ground systems, designing software and computers and paving the way for the future of exploration," said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "Today's parachute test in Yuma is an important reminder of the progress being made on Orion and its ultimate mission -- enabling NASA to meet the goal of sending humans to an asteroid and Mars."

The main objective of the latest drop test was to determine how the entire system would respond if one of the three main parachutes inflated too quickly. This occurs when what is known as a reefing stage, which helps the parachutes open gradually, is skipped, due to a premature firing of the reefing line cutter. Orion's two reefing stages help limit the initial amount of drag and force on the parachute system.

« Last Edit: 07/18/2012 09:08 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline phred

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #8 on: 07/18/2012 09:10 PM »
Man, is the real Orion going to rock around under the drogues that way?

Online jacqmans

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #9 on: 07/18/2012 09:14 PM »
RELEASE: 12-239

NASA COMPLETES ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL ORION PARACHUTE TEST

HOUSTON -- NASA completed another successful test Wednesday of the
Orion crew vehicle's parachutes high above the Arizona desert in
preparation for the spacecraft's orbital flight test in 2014. Orion
will carry astronauts deeper into space than ever before, provide
emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and
ensure a safe re-entry and landing.

A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of
25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern
Arizona. This test was the second to use an Orion craft that mimics
the full size and shape of the spacecraft.

Orion's drogue chutes were deployed between 15,000 feet and 20,000
feet, followed by the pilot parachutes, which deployed the main
landing parachutes. Orion descended about 25 feet per second, well
below its maximum designed touchdown speed, when it landed on the
desert floor.

"Across the country, NASA and industry are moving forward on the most
advanced spacecraft ever designed, conducting drop and splashdown
tests, preparing ground systems, designing software and computers and
paving the way for the future of exploration," said William
Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and
Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
"Today's parachute test in Yuma is an important reminder of the
progress being made on Orion and its ultimate mission -- enabling
NASA to meet the goal of sending humans to an asteroid and Mars."

Orion parachutes have so-called reefing lines, which when cut by a
pyrotechnic device, allow the parachute to open gradually, managing
the initial amount of drag and force on the parachute. The main
objective of the latest drop test was to determine how the entire
system would respond if one of the reefing lines was cut prematurely,
causing the three main parachutes to inflate too quickly.

Since 2007, the Orion program has conducted a vigorous parachute air
and ground test program and provided the chutes for NASA's successful
pad abort test in 2010. All of the tests build an understanding of
the chutes' technical performance for eventual human-rated
certification.

In 2014, an uncrewed Orion spacecraft will launch from Cape Canaveral
Air Force Station in Florida on Exploration Flight Test-1. The
spacecraft will travel 3,600 miles above Earth's surface. This is 15
times farther than the International Space Station's orbit and
farther than any spacecraft designed to carry humans has gone in more
than 40 years. The main flight objective is to understand Orion's
heat shield performance at speeds generated during a return from deep
space.

In 2017, Orion will be launched by NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), a
heavy-lift rocket that will provide an entirely new capability for
human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Designed to be flexible for
launching spacecraft for crew and cargo missions, SLS will enable new
missions of exploration and expand human presence across the solar
system.

For more information about Orion and for video and images of
Wednesday's test, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion


Offline Downix

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #10 on: 07/18/2012 10:22 PM »
Man, is the real Orion going to rock around under the drogues that way?
It was a test of a potential point of failure, one of the 'cutes opening before the others, not a nominal test by any means. Orion did incredibly well considering that they were intentionally setting it up to fail.
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Offline Lars_J

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #11 on: 07/18/2012 10:29 PM »
Man, is the real Orion going to rock around under the drogues that way?
It was a test of a potential point of failure, one of the 'cutes opening before the others, not a nominal test by any means. Orion did incredibly well considering that they were intentionally setting it up to fail.

I think he referring to the wobble under the drogues *before* the main chutes opened. (It was the main chutes that were intentionally sabotaged, not the drogues)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #12 on: 07/18/2012 11:07 PM »
Video that includes some additional before and after test footage.


NASA Completes Successful Orion Parachute Test

Published on Jul 18, 2012 by ReelNASA
A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona on July 18, 2012. This test was the second to use an Orion craft that mimics the full size and shape of the spacecraft.


« Last Edit: 07/18/2012 11:07 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Go4TLI

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #13 on: 07/19/2012 01:28 AM »
Man, is the real Orion going to rock around under the drogues that way?
It was a test of a potential point of failure, one of the 'cutes opening before the others, not a nominal test by any means. Orion did incredibly well considering that they were intentionally setting it up to fail.

I think he referring to the wobble under the drogues *before* the main chutes opened. (It was the main chutes that were intentionally sabotaged, not the drogues)

The drogue chutes have to dampen out the motion from Orion being pulled out of a C-17 and transitioning from nearly all horizontal motion to vertical. 

Completely normal. 

Offline Orbital Debris

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #14 on: 07/19/2012 01:58 PM »
Does anyone know what the nominal vertical speed (fps) for Orion is? 

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #15 on: 08/29/2012 09:39 AM »
August 28, 2012
http://www.facebook.com/NASAOrion

"The Orion team has just completed an air drop test of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) using the Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PCDTV 4). All visuals indicate a nominal parachute test. Recovery operations at the drop zone will begin shortly to return the test hardware to the hanger in Yuma which will complete the day’s activities."

------

My notes: The drop was from a C-130 aircraft and was designed to test behaviour under the condition of one flagging main parachute.  "Flagging" is fluttering and whipping of the canopy fabric during inflation, or as the result of failure to fully inflate.  The next test is scheduled for November 6, 2012 with the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV).

Online jacqmans

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #16 on: 08/29/2012 04:32 PM »
RELEASE: 12-299

NASA COMPLETES MAXIMUM PARACHUTE TEST FOR ORION SPACECRAFT

HOUSTON -- NASA Tuesday successfully completed another parachute test
of its Orion spacecraft high above the skies of the U.S. Yuma Army
Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona. The test examined the maximum
pressure Orion's parachutes might face when returning from
exploration missions.

Orion will be the most advanced spacecraft ever designed and carry
astronauts farther into space than ever before. It will provide
emergency abort capability, sustain astronauts during space travel
and provide safe re-entry from deep space.

During the test, a C-130 airplane dropped a dart-shaped test vehicle
with a simulated Orion parachute compartment from an altitude of
25,000 feet. Orion's drogue chutes were deployed at approximately
20,000 feet, followed by small pilot chutes, which then deployed the
three main parachutes. Each of the main parachutes is 116 feet wide
and weighs more than 300 pounds.

"Each one of these tests helps us verify the parachute system for
Orion is safe, efficient and robust," said Chris Johnson, a NASA
project manager for Orion's parachute assembly system. "Today's test
demonstrated the parachutes can deploy at the maximum velocity
expected when returning from deep space."

This is the latest in a series of parachute drop tests, with each one
designed to test a different condition or behavior of the parachutes.
Besides the dart-shaped test vehicle used to simulate the speeds at
which Orion will descend, NASA also uses a test vehicle that more
closely resembles the actual Orion spacecraft.

Orion will fly its first test flight, Exploration Flight Test 1, in
2014. During the test, the spacecraft will travel more than 3,600
miles into space -- 15 times farther from Earth than the
International Space Station -- and reach speeds of more than 20,000
mph before returning to Earth. This unmanned test flight will launch
from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. It is designed to
test several Orion systems, including the heat shield and parachutes
at speeds generated during a return from deep space.

In 2017, Orion will be launched by NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), a
heavy-lift rocket that will provide an entirely new capability for
human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Designed to be flexible for
launching spacecraft for crew and cargo missions, SLS will enable new
missions of exploration and expand human presence across the solar
system.

For more images of the test and more information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion


Offline catdlr

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #17 on: 09/05/2012 07:54 PM »
Orion Parachute Test, Aug. 28, 2012

Published on Sep 5, 2012 by ReelNASA

A dart-shaped test vehicle that is used to simulate Orion's parachute compartment descends above the skies of the U.S. Yuma Army Proving Ground in Arizona. Engineers were testing the maximum pressure Orion's chutes might face when returning from exploration missions.

« Last Edit: 09/05/2012 07:54 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Parachute Test Vehicle airdrop - July 18, 2012
« Reply #18 on: 10/12/2012 10:48 PM »
November 7, 2012 Orion parachute test:

Parachute team prepares for next air drop test
Orion Monthly Accomplishments, September 2012

Initial build activities have been completed on the next parachute drop test vehicle, called PTV-3, which is scheduled for an air drop test on Nov. 7 in Yuma, AZ. The next major set of buildup activities will begin the week of Oct. 8 with installation of pilot parachutes and pyros, followed by vehicle integration and stacking and test hardware avionics checkout. The upcoming drop test will perform objectives of a single drogue parachute deployment, followed by three main parachutes deployment. It will also include the PTV under one programmer prior to drogue deployment. The testing in Yuma helps to validate the parachutes design and demonstrates reliability of a safe landing for a crew returning to Earth.

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/696223main_Orion_SeptMAR.pdf

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