Author Topic: NASA - Juno - Updates  (Read 123066 times)

Offline TakeOff

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #540 on: 07/12/2017 12:24 PM »
What would it take to get a visual feeling of the altitude differences of the clouds of Jupiter? Jupiter always looks like a perfect marble because of its size and the distance of its spacecrafts. Could an in spiraling Juno image cloud tops a bit like we see cloud layers from an airplane, or is that unattainable for any spacecraft?

Offline Req

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #541 on: 07/12/2017 01:58 PM »
What would it take to get a visual feeling of the altitude differences of the clouds of Jupiter? Jupiter always looks like a perfect marble because of its size and the distance of its spacecrafts. Could an in spiraling Juno image cloud tops a bit like we see cloud layers from an airplane, or is that unattainable for any spacecraft?

Junocam has already taken some pictures where higher and lower cloud decks are apparent and casting shadows, along with some other interesting looking depressions and channel-like features.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #542 on: 07/12/2017 03:33 PM »
Quote
William Harwood‏ @cbs_spacenews 2m2 minutes ago

Juno: The first unprocessed images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot are now posted: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing/

https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/885159246886834176

Offline eeergo

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #543 on: 07/12/2017 04:20 PM »

Quote
William Harwood‏ @cbs_spacenews 2m2 minutes ago


Juno: The first unprocessed images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot are now posted: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing/


https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/885159246886834176


Other two (of the Red Spot) uploaded to the JunoCam raw images website:


https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing?source=junocam


Also, first online processing contributions are starting to pop up:


https://twitter.com/JPMajor/status/885163408114544640
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=8313
-DaviD-

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #544 on: 07/12/2017 05:12 PM »
If it can't propel itself to a flyby of any of the Galilean moons then what it's the danger of it eventually ending up crashing into Europa and contaminating it?
NSF experts, correct if I'm wrong here...

My understanding is long-term (years, decades, centuries?) perturbations of inert Juno's orbit:
near perijove--by Jupiter's oblateness--not a perfect sphere, equatorial radius significantly larger than polar radius; and by the four Galilean satellites;
near apojove--by the Sun.

Juno can correct for perturbations with the attitude control thrusters for the duration of the mission.  Once Juno is turned off, the perturbations continue with no way to correct them.

The danger is not as great as it was for Galileo--its eccentric equatorial orbits allowed close approaches to all four Galilean satellites for gravitational assists.

The orbits of the outer, irregular (natural) satellites are constantly changing due to solar and other-planetary perturbations.
« Last Edit: 07/12/2017 05:23 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #545 on: 07/12/2017 05:50 PM »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #546 on: 07/13/2017 12:34 PM »
More info posted at: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news/juno-spots-great-red-spot

Quote
This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Kevin Gill using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles (9,866 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
« Last Edit: 07/13/2017 12:41 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Star One

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NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #547 on: 07/13/2017 04:41 PM »
There's more here on this article.

https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=38093
« Last Edit: 07/13/2017 05:46 PM by Star One »

Offline eeergo

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #548 on: 07/13/2017 05:16 PM »
Plenty of other spectacular ones (not only of the GRS) popping up on UMSF and the Image Processing official Juno site, as for example these ones.
-DaviD-

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #549 on: 07/17/2017 07:14 PM »
Jupiter images thrill, inspire public participation

Quote
Processing images from the camera aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft orbiting Jupiter has turned into a cottage industry of sorts, as rank amateurs, accomplished artists and experienced researchers turn relatively drab “raw” images into shots ranging from whimsical to spectacular and everything in between.

The question is, how accurately do they reflect reality, and is there any way for the casual observer to judge the result?

Quote
“Once it’s in their hands, we have no control, nor do we want to exert any, over what they do with the data,” said Candy Hansen, a senior scientist at the Planetary Science Institute and the JunoCam instrument lead. “So we have gotten everything from careful scientific-type processing to incredibly whimsical works of art. So it’s a little bit, for you, a buyer-beware situation.”

Even so, she said, “we’re all in, in the sense that I don’t have a team of scientists and image processors waiting in the wings in case the public doesn’t show up. We don’t have a budget, we don’t have staff or anything like that. So we are entirely, 100 percent, relying on the public. And some of them have done fabulous work.”

Quote
But how realistic are the public’s interpretations of JunoCam images? With other NASA spacecraft, the viewer can have confidence the photos were processed and reviewed by scientifically competent team members and that the images reflect some sort of scientific reality.

With public processing, as Hansen said, it’s more a case of buyer beware, and the relatively bland raw images lend themselves to Photoshop-type manipulation. To Hansen, the line between a scientifically accurate image and one that takes liberties with the data is “the minute you depart from true color.”

“The minute you start making the blue a little bluer and the red a little redder, now you’ve enhanced the color. And when you really go to the sort of wild ends of the color palette, then I would call it exaggerated. If you’re just plain making up things, then it’s false color.

So should viewers wanting to learn more about Jupiter prefer realistic lighting and color to enhanced or exaggerated images?

“Let me argue against that,” she said. “Our human eye-brain combination is better at seeing details that are there when you exaggerate it a bit, when you enhance it a bit. The details, you can see (them) if you know what you’re looking for in the true color images. But it’s so subtle, it’s really, like, washed out. I would say we learn a lot by looking at enhanced color images because it pops more to the eye-brain combo.”

https://spaceflightnow.com/2017/07/15/jupiter-images-thrill-inspire-public-participation/

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #550 on: 09/09/2017 07:43 PM »
Jupiter’s aurora presents a powerful mystery

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Jupiter has the most powerful aurora in the solar system, so the team was not surprised that electric potentials play a role in their generation. What’s puzzling the researchers, Mauk said, is that despite the magnitudes of these potentials at Jupiter, they are observed only sometimes and are not the source of the most intense auroras, as they are at Earth.

“At Jupiter, the brightest auroras are caused by some kind of turbulent acceleration process that we do not understand very well,” said Mauk, who leads the investigation team for the APL-built Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI). “There are hints in our latest data indicating that as the power density of the auroral generation becomes stronger and stronger, the process becomes unstable and a new acceleration process takes over. But we’ll have to keep looking at the data.”

https://astronomynow.com/2017/09/09/jupiters-aurora-presents-a-powerful-mystery/

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #551 on: 09/10/2017 09:35 PM »
Juno Scientists Prepare for Seventh Science Pass of Jupiter

Seventh science flyby/eighth perijove on September 1.

There is imagery available on the SWRI Juno web site: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/
« Last Edit: 09/10/2017 09:38 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #552 on: 09/13/2017 03:04 PM »
Quote
09.08.17
Juno’s Eighth Close Approach to Jupiter

This series of enhanced-color images shows Jupiter up close and personal, as NASA’s Juno spacecraft performed its eighth flyby of the gas giant planet. The images were obtained by JunoCam.

From left to right, the sequence of images taken on Sept. 1, 2017 from 3:03 p.m. to 3:11 p.m. PDT (6:03 p.m. to 6:11 p.m. EDT). At the times the images were taken, the spacecraft ranged from 7,545 to 14,234 miles (12,143 to 22,908 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude range of -28.5406 to -44.4912 degrees.

Points of Interest include "Dalmatian Zone/Eye of Odin," "Dark Eye/STB Ghost East End,"           "Coolest Place on Jupiter," and "Renslow/Hurricane Rachel." The final image in the series on the right shows Jupiter’s south pole coming into view.

JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at: www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam

https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news/junos-eighth-close-approach-to-jupiter?linkId=42177919

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #553 on: 11/02/2017 11:01 PM »
Juno Aces Eighth Science Pass of Jupiter, Names New Project Manager

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Data returned Tuesday, Oct. 31, indicate that NASA's Juno spacecraft successfully completed its eighth science flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops on Tuesday, Oct. 24. The confirmation was delayed by several days due to solar conjunction at Jupiter, which affected communications during the days prior to and after the flyby.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6992
Tony De La Rosa

Tags: Jupiter Juno JunoCam JUMPER