Author Topic: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 30 2019  (Read 159920 times)

Offline Hungry4info3

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #260 on: 12/01/2017 01:46 AM »
I remember it vividly. We got a snapshot every second or two, then the full video was uploaded back to Earth later.
Edit: Found the live broadcast.
« Last Edit: 12/01/2017 01:55 AM by Hungry4info3 »

Online sanman

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #261 on: 12/01/2017 02:34 AM »
Meh, given ISRO's track record, live coverage of the landing would be quite a departure from past practice. They'll probably post it quickly to Twitter, after it's happened.

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #262 on: 12/01/2017 04:28 AM »
Thanks for that, Hungry!  I appreciate it.  I never did see that broadcast.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #263 on: 12/01/2017 04:48 AM »
I remember it vividly. We got a snapshot every second or two, then the full video was uploaded back to Earth later.
Edit: Found the live broadcast.

I was in Thailand and watched it live on China TV.
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Offline plutogno

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #264 on: 12/01/2017 05:34 AM »
I remember they were streamed live

Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #265 on: 12/03/2017 05:31 AM »
India's Chandrayaan-2 mission preparing for March 2018 launch

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The launch of the next Moon mission could be just four months away. India plans to return to the Moon in a big way with the ambitious Chandrayaan-2, which includes an orbiter, lander, and a small rover. If it all succeeds, it will be India's first soft landing on another world, and only the second such landing since the end of the Apollo and Luna era. For India, landing success would be "a stepping stone for future exploration missions to other planets," according to Indian Space Research Organisation Satellite Centre (ISAC) director M. Annadurai.

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Chandrayaan-2 is planned to launch in March from ISRO's Sriharikota launch center aboard a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark 2 (GSLV Mk 2) rocket, making it ISRO's first deep-space launch on its newer, heavier launch vehicle. The combined mass of the three component spacecraft is 3250 kilograms, dramatically larger than the approximately 1300-kilogram mass of both Chandrayaan-1 and Mars Orbiter Mission, both of which launched on smaller Polar Satellite Launch Vehicles (PSLVs).

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The GSLV will place Chandrayaan-2 into an elliptical Earth parking orbit, enlarging it over days or weeks with periapsis burns to raise the orbit apogee. Eventually, the apogee will be high enough that a burn can send the spacecraft on to a lunar transfer trajectory. A lunar orbit insertion burn will place Chandrayaan-2 into an elliptical orbit and the spacecraft will begin braking at periapsis to reduce its orbit to a 100-kilometer circle.

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Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #266 on: 12/09/2017 07:57 PM »
K. Sivan, VSSC Director now confirms the Chandrayaan-2 mission launch in March, 2018,

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Sivan said, "After the Cartosat mission, the subsequent launch will be of Gsat-6A that will be lifted off by a GSLV Mk II rocket". "The launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I, which will replace the first navigation satellite IRNSS-1A, whose three atomic clocks (meant to provide precise locational data) had stopped working last year, is planned in February or March," he said, adding, "Next in line will be the Chandrayaan-2 mission, scheduled for launch in March."

Source : Isro will resume sat launches only from first week of 2018

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Offline worldtimedate

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #267 on: 01/13/2018 10:19 PM »
Chandrayaan-2 set for bungee jump test in Mahendragiri hills of Tamil Nadu

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Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are set to conduct a breathtaking stunt at Mahendragiri hills in Tamil Nadu. A bungee jump is being planned for Chandrayaan-2 craft as part of soft landing tests using a 100-metre tall crane (as tall as a 10-storeyed building) specially built for the purpose.

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Chandrayaan-2 is India’s most ambitious project as yet consisting of an orbiter, lander and a small rover. If it succeeds, it will be India’s first soft-landing on the Moon, and only the second such landing since the end of the Apollo and Luna missions.

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He said the craft, weighing about half-a-tonne, will be lowered from 100 metres and ignited in a lower gravity condition like that of the Moon.

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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #268 on: 01/14/2018 06:45 PM »
Chandrayaan-2 set for bungee jump test in Mahendragiri hills of Tamil Nadu

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Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are set to conduct a breathtaking stunt at Mahendragiri hills in Tamil Nadu. A bungee jump is being planned for Chandrayaan-2 craft as part of soft landing tests using a 100-metre tall crane (as tall as a 10-storeyed building) specially built for the purpose.

Isn't it a little late to be preparing to test soft landing?
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Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #269 on: 01/15/2018 05:29 AM »
Presumably not a test to figure out how to do it, but a test to check the final flight harware behaves as it should (like shake and bake).  One would hope so anyway!

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #270 on: 01/21/2018 05:31 PM »
Has anyone (outside ISRO and/or free to comment) computed and shared monthly lunar launch windows for Chandrayaan-2?

Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?
« Last Edit: 01/21/2018 05:40 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #271 on: 01/22/2018 04:42 AM »
Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?

Presumably, as it takes a certain of amount of time to reach the Moon, regardless of route chosen and that ISRO would like to land early in the Lunar day, this would mean the window would open for a few days each month.
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Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #272 on: 01/30/2018 04:40 PM »
'Enhanced' GSLV MkII to launch Chandrayaan-II in April, says new ISRO Chief
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Among the innovations and value additions being developed is the augmentation of the GSLV Mark II launch vehicle. Dr. Sivan said its lifting capability would soon be enhanced from 2.2 tonnes to 3.3 tonnes. The capability then would go up by 1.5 times and would reflect in its per-kilo cost, which could make it quite competitive to future commercial users in the launchers market.

The first launch of the enhanced GSLV, after necessary tests and confirmations, will be the 3.2-tonne Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft, scheduled to be launched in April.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #273 on: 01/31/2018 06:21 AM »
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #274 on: 01/31/2018 10:43 AM »
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds

Offline Kosmos2001

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #275 on: 01/31/2018 12:03 PM »
Does this version have a new name designation or is it just a plain GSLV Mk.II?

Offline K210

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #276 on: 01/31/2018 12:26 PM »
Does this version have a new name designation or is it just a plain GSLV Mk.II?

It will have the same name. It is just a natural evolution of the GSLV MK-2 not a complete new rocket.

Offline vineethgk

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #277 on: 01/31/2018 03:25 PM »
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds
The last one about S-200 is perhaps unlikely as it would be a major change that will have an impact on the flight characteristics of the vehicle. Moreover, S-200 has a greater diameter than S-139 (3.2m vs 2.8m). What we have heard so far from ISRO sources are inert mass reduction, increased propellant load and increased thrust in CUS, and the thrust upgrade for Vikas engines.

However, the Chandrayaan-II flight may not necessarily require all of these upgrades despite its 3.2 tonne mass as the targeted parking orbit is lower than GTO (around 180x19500 km or so).

Offline Kosmos2001

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #278 on: 01/31/2018 07:15 PM »
It will have the same name. It is just a natural evolution of the GSLV MK-2 not a complete new rocket.

Well, according to:

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds

The last one about S-200 is perhaps unlikely as it would be a major change that will have an impact on the flight characteristics of the vehicle. Moreover, S-200 has a greater diameter than S-139 (3.2m vs 2.8m). What we have heard so far from ISRO sources are inert mass reduction, increased propellant load and increased thrust in CUS, and the thrust upgrade for Vikas engines.

In my opinion, these are substantially enough modifications to change the name of the launcher a little bit. There are different variants of the GSLV already: Mk.I, Mk.I+, Mk.II and Mk.II+. Each one of those uses an S139 instead of a S200.

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
« Reply #279 on: 02/01/2018 04:05 AM »
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/india-plans-tricky-and-unprecedented-landing-near-moon-s-south-pole

An article about Chandrayaan 2 with a note about its landing site.  See this site:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=6862&st=0&gopid=238499&#entry238499

for a map of the location and some other comments.