Author Topic: Science Experiments in the ISS  (Read 177002 times)

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #300 on: 11/20/2014 12:30 PM »
Researching the Physics of Cooling Liquid Metals Adds Levity to Space Station

[...] The traditional process of casting alloys includes heating, shaping and then rapidly cooling them to create a specific form. Rapid cooling hardens the alloys into a solid structure while also forming their microstructure. Solid alloys form mixed structures composed of crystals that make up their microstructure, which impacts the characteristics of strength, flexibility and resistance to fatigue.

EML processes one sample at a time. Each sample is suspended in weightlessness and supported by magnetic repulsion, the force that pushes like ends of magnets apart. The sample is heated to liquefaction. No containers are used to hold the metals during experiments in the EML so measurements of the heated metals can be taken in purest form. In contrast, ground studies of alloys must use containers to hold the heated liquid forms. [...]

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/eml/index.html#.VGz9LN4eMg9
« Last Edit: 11/20/2014 12:31 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline Space Pete

Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #301 on: 12/17/2014 07:31 PM »
Arrived in my inbox.

2014 CASIS Annual Report: A Year of Milestones for the ISS National Lab Community
ww2.iss-casis.org/e/51802/Annual-Report-2014/297q6/14869647
« Last Edit: 12/17/2014 07:32 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline bolun

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #302 on: 07/05/2016 08:01 PM »
Expose-R2 samples

Retrieving ESA’s Expose-R2 experiment from Soyuz TMA-19M capsule that returned ESA astronaut Tim Peake, cosomonaut commander Yuri Malenchenko and NASA astronaut Tim Kopra to Earth on 18 June 2016 after 186 days in space.

Hitching a ride in the Soyuz capsule were 46 species of small organisms and more than 150 organic compounds. Their voyage was even more intense than the astronaut trio’s – these samples spent 18 months in space, bolted to the outside of the International Space Station.

Expose-R2 is a miniature photochemistry laboratory that exposes samples to the harsh environment of space. Subjected to the full blast of the Sun’s energy as well as vacuum, radiation and temperature swings, they are helping researchers investigating how chemicals and microbiological life react to unprotected spaceflight – on a comet, for example. Previous Expose experiments have already shown that ‘water bears’ and a species of lichen can survive a trip into space.

Related article: Exposed to space and back on Earth

Image credit: ESA–A. Shavchenko

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/07/Expose-R2_samples

Offline catdlr

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #303 on: 07/07/2016 11:12 PM »
Monthly ISS Research Video Update for July 2016

NASA Johnson

Published on Jul 7, 2016
See the highlights of recent research conducted on the International Space Station during July.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE0LbWntBv4?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #304 on: 08/04/2016 02:12 PM »
I think this is the best place to post this, but please move this post if it's misplaced.

Yesterday a video was posted about the two gloveboxes Nasa wants to deploy on the ISS:

MSG (Micro-gravity Science Glovebox)  has been in orbit since UF2 (STS-111, 2002) and is now located in LAB S2.
If I'm not mistaken at the 2015 ISS R&D conference it was reported the MSG will be modified so the work volume is better accessible. If my interpretation is correct the front window will get a hinged door, so larger experiment equipment can be placed inside MSG.
At the same conference it was reported a second glovebox will be braught to the ISS, it was still under investigation if this would be a second MSG or the LSG.
LSG (Live Science Glovebox) was designed for the CAM (Centrifuze Accomodation Module). The CAM was build by JAXA, but ended up at a parkinglot because of the ISS program adjustment after the Challenger desaster.
In the video it is stated the LSG will be send to the ISS during 2018, it will be located in the JEM-PM (Kibo). It will not be a ISPR (Rack facility), but a facility stowed inside a ZSG and it will use a adjacent EXPRESS-rack.
(I speculate there are two options:
- the ZSG at JEM F6 (behind the JEM Airlock), and it will use EX-4 [JEM F5)
- the ZSG at JEM A6 (beside MSPR-1 JAXA multipurpose rack for live science, JEM A5), and it will use EX-4.

Currently EX-4 houses all Nanoracks facilities. At the ISS R&D 2015 conference it was reported that two or three Basic Express Racks (BER) will be send to the ISS. They only provide power, data and cooling to the payloads. So they are perfectly suited for Nanoracks labs, Tangolabs and other new locker facilities. EX-4 can be used for more demanding live science equipment.

Offline bolun

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #305 on: 09/16/2016 02:33 PM »
Matiss

The Matiss experiment will test the anti-bacterial properties of materials in space. France’s space agency CNES has selected five advanced materials that should stop bacteria from settling and growing on the surface.

Bacteria are a big problem in space as they tend to build up in the constantly-recycled atmosphere of the International Space Station. Matiss aims to find better materials to build a space station or spacecraft with, especially important for longer missions farther from Earth. Researchers will also monitor how bacteria form biofilms that protect them from cleaning agents and help them adhere to surfaces.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/09/Matiss

Image credit: CNES

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #306 on: 10/14/2016 07:26 AM »
Checking out OA-5's payload (http://spaceflight101.com/cygnus-oa5/cargo-manifest/) I came across the "Cool Flames" experiment it's bringing up. It's a follow-on to a previous combustion experiment that yielded completely unexpected results on two-stage burning of pure fuels (visible - invisible). More details about the experiment to be flown can be found here:


http://spaceflight101.com/cygnus-oa5/cargo-manifest/


And I can't resist to post this video showing the phenomenon :)


-DaviD-

Offline catdlr

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #307 on: 11/02/2016 03:36 AM »
Monthly ISS Research Video Update for October 2016

NASA Johnson

Published on Nov 1, 2016
See the highlights of recent research conducted on the International Space Station during October.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGE81m_c1gA?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline bolun

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #308 on: 12/12/2016 08:55 PM »
http://www.asi.it/en/news/ams-faces-a-new-challenge

Quote
A team of researchers known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Collaboration has found evidence of a possible unknown source of positrons making their way through the universe to Earth. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the team offers a report on cosmic ray strikes that have been reported by the AMS aboard the International Space Station and why they believe the data suggests that some of the recorded strikes could not be attributed to primary cosmic rays colliding with gas atoms in space.


Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #309 on: 12/19/2016 07:08 PM »
When will the AMS team publish next?

(They published in Physical Review Letters on April 3, 2013, and again on September 8, 2014.  After those, there were presentations at CERN on April 15-17, 2015.)
Physical Review Letters, Vol. 117, Iss. 23, 2 December 2016

"Precision Measurement of the Boron to Carbon Flux Ratio in Cosmic Rays from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station"

M. Aguilar et al. (AMS Collaboration)

Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 231102 – Published 28 November 2016

Abstract 
Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the boron to carbon flux ratio (B/C) is important in understanding the propagation of cosmic rays. The precise measurement of the B/C ratio from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV, based on 2.3 million boron and 8.3 million carbon nuclei collected by AMS during the first 5 years of operation, is presented. The detailed variation with rigidity of the B/C spectral index is reported for the first time. The B/C ratio does not show any significant structures in contrast to many cosmic ray models that require such structures at high rigidities. Remarkably, above 65 GV, the B/C ratio is well described by a single power law Rdelta  with index delta = -0.333 +/-0.014 (fit) +/-0.005 (syst), in good agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence which predicts delta = -1/3 asymptotically.
***

Or, in other words, see Physics http://physics.aps.org/articles/v9/137
Focus: More Hints of Exotic Cosmic-Ray Origin

November 28, 2016
Physics 9, 137

New Space Station data support a straightforward model of cosmic-ray propagation through the Galaxy but also add to previous signs of undiscovered cosmic-ray sources such as dark matter.
« Last Edit: 12/19/2016 07:12 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #310 on: 02/15/2017 09:22 AM »
SOLAR shut down today after 9 years of successful operation. Webcast here: https://livestream.com/ESA/solar
-DaviD-

Offline catdlr

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #311 on: 02/16/2017 01:30 AM »
SAGE III on ISS: Building on a Storied Legacy

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Feb 15, 2017
The SAGE III instrument is all set for launch to the International Space Station Saturday, Feb. 18, at 10:01 a.m. EST aboard SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-10. From its new home on orbit, SAGE will monitor the Earth's ozone levels and aerosols. SAGE III is the latest in a series of missions that started back in the 1970s with Deke Slayton using a handheld instrument. From these humble beginnings, scientists and engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center have built a long-term record of important Earth science data.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nu5TL8ZP0IU?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #312 on: 07/07/2017 07:53 AM »
Most likely this is already posted some were else. But I think it's nice to also post it here.
Last februari the MSG (Microgravity Science Glovebox) was upgraded. The fixed front panel was replaced by a removable one. This allows much beter acces to the inside of the glovebox.
Also LSG (Live Science Glovebox) is planned to launch in 2018.
Sources: bradford-space ; ..2 and Nasa

The modified MSG was already visible in this Space to Ground video from March 3th.
« Last Edit: 07/07/2017 08:11 AM by Rik ISS-fan »

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