Author Topic: Science Experiments in the ISS  (Read 182453 times)

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #20 on: 03/16/2008 10:24 PM »
And also a nice roundup of the experiments Endeavour is delivering (I already wrote about this, but this is an 'official' summary)

---------------------------------------------------

The Space Shuttle Endeavour has launched on the STS-123/1J/A mission. This mission brings 6 experiments and two new Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) facilities to ISS.

Experiments Delivered to ISS

CWRW (Reverse Genetic Approach to Exploring Genes Responsible for Cell Wall Dynamics in Supporting Tissues of Arabidopsis Under Microgravity Conditions and Role of Microtubule-Membrane-Cell Wall Continuum in Gravity Resistance in Plants) consists of two experiments sponsored by JAXA. Both of the investigations use Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) to determine effect of microgravity on different aspects of the structure of the plants. The first experiment, Cell Wall, hopes to determine the molecular mechanism that is regulated by gravity within the cell wall. The second experiment, Resist Wall, will examine the structural connections between microtubules, plasma membrane, and cell wall in order to determine the mechanism of gravity resistance.

LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System) is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances on board the space station. Phase I of this investigation, which tested the technology, was completed during Expedition 15. Phase II, providing for the detection of molds and yeast, is scheduled to begin during Expedition 16.

CSI-02 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert 02) is an educational suite of experiments designed to interest students in science, technology, engineering and math. STS-123/1J/A will be delivering a replacement habitat for the plant growth experiment. This new habitat (PDHab) contains seeds in a gel medium and will be linked to classroom activities as part of the Adventure of the Agronaut.

MISSE 6A and 6B (Materials International Space Station Experiment - 6A and 6B) is the newest installment of the suite of external material experiments. Tested are a variety of materials ranging from polymers to paints to candidate material that will used for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) in the harsh environment of space. The samples will be evaluated for their reaction to atomic oxygen erosion, direct sunlight, radiation, and extremes of heat and cold.

SHERE (Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment) is fluid physics experiment that studies the effect of preshear (rotation) on the stress and strain response of a polymeric liquid (a fluid consisting of many molecular chains) being stretched in microgravity.

BCAT-4-Poly (Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4- Polydispersion) is one of two experiments in the BCAT-4 experiment suite. BCAT-4-Poly uses polymer and polydispersed (range of particle size) colloid particles suspended in a liquid to examine how crystal nucleation and growth occurs in microgravity, and gain insight into factors that limit particle ordering and crystal growth.

Facilities

Saibo (Saibo Experiment Rack) is a JAXA multipurpose payload rack system for biological experiments that transports, stores and supports the subrack facilities Clean Bench (CB) and Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). Saibo provides structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water and other items needed to operate biological science experiments on board the ISS.

Ryutai (Ryutai Experiment Rack) is a JAXA multipurpose payload rack system for fluid physics experiments containing the sub-rack facilities Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF); Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF); Protein Crystallization Research Facility (PCRF) and the Image Processing Unit (IPU). Ryutai provides structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water and other items needed to operate science experiments in microgravity on board the ISS.

-------------------------------------------
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #21 on: 03/19/2008 10:53 PM »

There's an interesting Russian-German experiment (PK-3+) being prepared in the Russian Section, noted in this week's Status Reports:

FE-1 Yuri Malenchenko continued preparations for operating the Russian/German TEKh-20 Plasma Crystal-3 Plus (PK-3+) experiment payload.    [After unstowing and setting up the hardware yesterday in the Service Module (SM), leak checking of the electronics box and evacuation of the vacuum work chamber (ZB) in the SM Work Compartment (RO) with the turbopump, Malenchenko today conducted more hardware testing and calibration, uploaded new software from a USB stick, checked out the software installation and verified the readiness of the experiment.  After starting the turbo pump right after wake-up and conducting additional leak checking on the ZB during the “day”, the FE-1 deactivated the turbopump this morning at ~4:55am EDT.  The resulting log file was then downloaded to laptop for downlink via BSR-TM.  The experiment is performed on plasma, i.e., fine particles charged and excited by HF (high frequency) radio power inside the evacuated work chamber.  Main objective is to obtain a homogeneous plasma dust cloud at various pressures and particle quantities with or without superimposition of an LF (low frequency) harmonic electrical field.  The experiment is conducted in automated mode.  PK-3+ has more advanced hardware and software than the previously used Russian PKE-Nefedov payload.]

Also, FSL continues to give problems and it appears reconfiguring the LAN cable has been unsuccessful. I suppose this is a fluid situation, but no further action is expected till next week, and no new hardware will be brought up before 124/1J... I guess GeoFlow will have to wait :(

Columbus FSL Update:   Ground teams have attempted another FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) troubleshooting by swapping to the redundant Bus (MIL Bus B) and activating the FSL ISPR (International Standard Payload Rack).   However, voltage and amperage checks during the RPDA (Remote Power Distribution Assembly) activation were off-nominal.   Any further troubleshooting activities are on hold until next week, after the 1J/A joint mission.  A new connector for FSL will be flown on Flight 1J (not on Soyuz 16S).

-DaviD-

Offline wlan

  • Member
  • Posts: 6
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #23 on: 03/30/2008 03:52 PM »

Nice addition there, I hadn't spotted that one :)

Today I bring another summary of this week's ISS science from today's Status Report:

-----------------------------

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 23)          

             

ALTCRISS  (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module. Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module. 

             

ANITA:   Completed.

             

BCAT-3  (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

             

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

             

CCISS  (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

             

CFE  (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

             

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA  Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    Two sides of first Silicate Garden complete with students analyzing data in their classrooms currently, and two Petri Dish runs complete but with no results.  The Petri Dish installed during 1JA joint ops contains two small tomato plants as seen in the downlinked images with a possible third new one. This Petri Dish will remain in place until 1J when it will be returned for analysis of plant material.

             

CGBA-2  (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

             

CSLM-2  (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

             

EarthKAM  (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

             

ELITE-S2  (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.

             

EPO  (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

             

ETD  (Eye Tracking Device):   Last session (4th) is currently planned just before Soyuz docked Ops.

             

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):   The EuTEF platform power feeders have been successfully de-activated/re-activated in conjunction with the EVA-3 and EVA-5 on 3/18 and 3/23, respectively.  On 3/24, a graceful shutdown was performed after off-nominal and incoherent telemetry readings.  EuTEF is nominal since then. - DEBIE-2: the instrument showed regular link errors. Currently powered off; - DOSTEL: On-going science acquisition; - EuTEMP: Currently inactive as planned; - EVC: after a successful commissioning, we encountered some difficulty to get nominal images acquisition. Under investigation if the problem comes from EVC itself or from the Columbus High Rate Multiplexer; Currently powered off; - EXPOSE: On-going science acquisition; - FIPEX: FIPEX showed Link Errors and was further troubleshooted this week; tests are on-going and basic science measurements are collected; - MEDET: On-going science acquisition; - PLEGPAY: The first long-duration (100 hrs) experiment has been started on 3/26; Currently powered on; - TRIBOLAB: in Stand-by mode, awaiting to start science acquisition after ATV docking on 4/3; Currently powered on.

             

Fluid  Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL  Facility is awaiting further troubleshooting after 1J/A departure.

             

GEOFLOW:   On 3/25, the FSL VMU (Video Management Unit) Optical Fibre has been tested and is fully functional.  The FSL commissioning will continue in the next coming weeks.  FSL LAN and MIL bus repair activities have been postponed until after 1J/A mission.  Start of GEOFLOW is pending further FSL troubleshooting/commissioning activities.

             

IMMUNO  (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term  Stay at ISS):    Blood and urine samples of first session have been downloaded on STS-123 (1J/A).  Second session is currently planned during Soyuz docked Ops.

             

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from  Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In  progress.

             

Integrated  Immune:  “Peggy, thank you for unstowing Garrett’s saliva kit and having it ready for him to begin his collections.  Garrett, we appreciate your efforts during your early increment Integrated Immune session.”

             

KUBIK-FM1/  KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Completed.

             

LOCAD-PTS  (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

             

MISSE  (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

             

MTR-2  (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive  dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

             

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

             

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

             

NOA-2  (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):     Planned.

             

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:   Planned.

             

PMDIS  (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

             

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

             

SLEEP  (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    “Peggy, we have placed on your task list next week the next Sleep download activity.  During this activity you will be changing the battery in your Actiwatch as well as downloading and initializing 1J/A FE-2 and your Actiwatches.  You will also change the battery and initialize an Actiwatch for the South-Korean SFP (KARI Space Flight Participant).  Thanks for your participation.”

             

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    Anomaly on platform Sun pointing mode under further investigation: no science acquisition possible so far.  However, calibration runs of SOLSPEC spectral lamps have been performed on 3/26 and 3/27.  On 3/27, SOLAR went unexpectedly in stand-by mode, but has been fully recovered. The calibration run on 3/27 will have to be repeated.

             

SPHERES  (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In  progress. 

             

Swab  (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   Complete.

             

TRAC  (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

             

ULTRASOUND:    “Peggy, thank you for moving and  checking out the Ultrasound – we were VERY excited to see if functioning  nominally!”

             

WAICO  #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different  g-levels):    The 4 ECs (Experiment Containers) from Rotor A (0-g condition) transfer from BIOLAB TCU#1 (Temperature Control Unit 1) to MERLIN (Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator II) cooler unit has been successfully performed on 3/24.  The MERLIN temperature was monitored on a daily basis and was very stable.  These 4 ECs have been downloaded on STS-123 (1J/A) and currently shipped to Germany.  The 4 ECs of Rotor B are yet to be retrieved by the crew from the blocked Rotor B.  BIOLAB anomalies encountered during WAICO-Run#1 imply major impact on science return.

             

CEO  (Crew Earth Observation):  Ongoing.

             

CEO photo targets (for discretionary picture  taking) uplinked for today were Spider Impact Crater, W   Australia (this 13-km-wide crater is old [>570 million years].  A comprehensive search of the CEO database shows no handheld images), Hyderabad,   India (looking immediately left for this important city of 6.7 million.  Visual cue is the dark line of the river that runs through the city.  Trying to shoot the diffuse urban boundary), Somalia Coast (CEO observers are documenting longer term changes of vegetation in this semi desert.  Shooting a swath following the coast.  Vegetation seems to green and die off in concert with multi-year El Niños), and Kwanza Basin, Angola (a mapping swath under track was requested to document new economic development as oil wealth streams into Angola.  Looking for linear features such as railroads, highways, and power lines).

             

CEO  photography can be studied at this “Gateway” website:
                   http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov  (as of 3/1/08, this database  contained 757,605 views of the Earth from space, with 314,000 from the ISS  alone).

--------------------------------------------------

Worth noting is EuTEF is coming to terms finally after the problems it encountered, and is starting to actively acquire science as it was designed to, even though not all the experiments are yet functioning nominally. Also, FSL appears to be promisingly advancing, once the crew can get some time to install the LAN. SOLAR is also advancing, but less determinedly, as there are serious issues with sun-pointing yet. Finally, there's a note concerning WAICO, which although having successfully been brought down to Earth, probably won't give much science return because of BioLab's problems.

And I have a question: what exactly do they mean when they list an experiment as "reserve"? 

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
Science update briefing for Exp 16 - 17
« Reply #24 on: 04/05/2008 04:31 PM »

I finally got some time to watch the Exp16-to-Exp17 press briefings, and specifically I caught some interesting science updates. I took some notes of the more interesting facts:

  •  Some 5 new racks and 2 external facilities up and running in the space station.
  • The Salmonella results of a previous Shuttle flight (I forgot which one, but they found their virulence was higher after being in space), made some scientists accelerate the preparation for a new experiment, which was flown in this last Shuttle mission, as a direct follow-on.
  • Lots of experiments going on (as can be seen in this thread), only a few listed on the briefing.
  • Collaboration with Russia in Braslet and Ultrasound, to study ways to regulate fluid flow in the body.
  • Another collaboration, now with Canada: cardio and cerebrovascular fitness to control and understand better the orthostatic intolerance: a tendence to faint after returning to gravity.
  • MISSE 6 is a collaboration with Europe (using the exposed facilities), especially interesting results for Constellation. Also some fundamental atomic oxygen scattering experiments.
  • Two physics experiments:
    • Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures Experiment, to study how metal alloys coarse when heated, the observations can only be made in space. Interesting for turbine jets and structures using alloys in general.
    • In-SPACE 2 (Investigating the structure of paramagnetic aggregates from colloidal emulsions), studies magnetorheological fluids (change their behaviour when subjected to magnetic fields, like iron fluids suspended in water or glycerin), observed with cameras in the MGS, which by the way is a very demanded facility, and is continuosly being used. They found an unexpected result with low frequency magnetic fields, and thanks to being in a long duration flight, they could adapt the experiment to the results and investigate further into the phenomenon, allocating more time. 42 runs were performed. Long duration spaceflight experiments are much more flexible and scientifically interesting than those performed during a time constrained mission, like the Shuttle.
  • Educational experiments: like Newton laws demonstrations by Dan.
  • More sophisticated educational experiments, like a NUTRITION overview by Peggy. NUTRITION log very nicely filling up, studies methabolism and hormonal changes in space, uses centrifuge in Destiny's HRF and samples come back in Shuttle or Soyuz.
  • Continuing the science experiments in Expedition 17, some new are coming (not specified) and coming up the activation of the Japanese racks.
-DaviD-

Offline anik

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7358
  • Liked: 340
  • Likes Given: 284
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #25 on: 04/05/2008 04:45 PM »
34 Russian experiments will be performed during Expedition 17. Two of them (Vsplesk and MATI-75) are new experiments.

http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/iss17/res.html

15 South Korean experiments will be carried out during Yi So-yeon flight.

http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/kap.html

Offline Kel

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1250
  • Minneapolis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #26 on: 04/05/2008 08:50 PM »
Thanks for posting all of the science that is being done - are results or data of what they are finding posted anywhere? I know the Salmonella experiment from STS-115 was written up and published independently (sorry, forgot where), but I haven't heard about what they are discovering with most of the experiments.

Offline rvastro

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 29
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #27 on: 04/05/2008 09:08 PM »
In reading this thread, maybe someone should send it to a certian Nobel prize winning physicist; who in so many words said that there is no "real" significant science being done on ISS.

Offline Lawntonlookirs

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1419
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #28 on: 04/06/2008 01:49 PM »
Sounds like some of the experiments are getting up and running.  With all of the activity on the ISS, it is a wounder that they have time on the ISS to get them started.  Thanks for sharing the results of some of them as a lot of the data would probably not be known by the average person.
Everyman is my superior in that I may learn from him.  Albert Einstein

Offline Analyst

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3337
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #29 on: 04/06/2008 03:41 PM »
Quote
rvastro - 5/4/2008  11:08 PM

In reading this thread, maybe someone should send it to a certian Nobel prize winning physicist; who in so many words said that there is no "real" significant science being done on ISS.

Pure quantity is no good metric.

Science results in relation to input recources (budget) compared with alternative use of this recources for other science programs (on earth or in space) would be. Human spaceflight would lose with margin compared to unmanned spaceflight and compared to resarch done on earth.

Analyst

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #30 on: 04/06/2008 07:24 PM »

Quote
Kel - 5/4/2008  9:50 PM  Thanks for posting all of the science that is being done - are results or data of what they are finding posted anywhere? I know the Salmonella experiment from STS-115 was written up and published independently (sorry, forgot where), but I haven't heard about what they are discovering with most of the experiments.

I have found this list of the publications concerning experiments on the ISS:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/Publications.html

I suppose to access most of these publications you need to be subscribed or buy the paper version. Some of them are results published in conferences.

Apart from this, we have another Weekly update released, as well as some info concerning the newly delivered Cell Wall / Resist Wall Japanese experiment, which apparently is not working correctly. Not sure if this has to do with the EMCS in BioLab (remember WAICO also had problems) or with the experiment itself:

---------------------------------------

FE-2 Reisman worked on the EMCS (European Modular Cultivation System) to check out the various connections associated with the facility’s water flow system.  The Japanese CW/RW (Cell Wall/Resist Wall) experiment is not working as planned, and troubleshooting will hopefully find the root cause of this problem and get the plants watered and growing.    [CW/RW  operates in the EMCS facility in eight special ECs (Experiment Containers) which Garrett recently (3/30) installed on the centrifuges of the facility.  The EMCS rack contains two rotating centrifuges that can support a wide range of small plant & animal experiments under partial gravity conditions.   On Rotor A, the new ECs for CW/RW are EC92 in position A1, EC95 at A2, EC94 at A3, EC96 at A4, on Rotor B - EC97 in position B1, EC99 at B2, EC98 at B3, and EC100 at B4.  The removed ECs were stowed.]

---------------------------------------

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 24)          

             

ALTCRISS  (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the DC1/PIRS module.  Card replacement performed on 3/31. Photos were taken by the crew of potential ALTCRISS FGB location for Inc17.  

             

ANITA:   Completed.

             

BCAT-3  (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

             

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

             

CCISS  (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

             

CFE  (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

             

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA  Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In  progress.

             

CGBA-2  (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

             

CSLM-2  (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

             

EarthKAM  (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

             

ELITE-S2  (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.

             

EPO  (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

             

ETD  (Eye Tracking Device):   Last  session (4th) is currently planned just before Soyuz docked Ops.

             

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):   In progress.

             

Fluid  Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL  Facility is awaiting further troubleshooting after 1J/A departure.

             

GEOFLOW:   Planned.

             

IMMUNO  (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term  Stay at ISS):       Second session is currently planned for 4/12 through 4/15.

             

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from  Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In  progress.

             

Integrated  Immune:  “Peggy, thank you for unstowing Garrett’s saliva kit and having it ready for him to begin his collections.  Garrett, we appreciate your efforts during your early increment Integrated Immune session.”

             

KUBIK-FM1/  KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Completed.

             

LOCAD-PTS  (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

             

MISSE  (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

             

MTR-2  (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive  dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

             

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

             

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

             

NOA-2  (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):     Planned.

             

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    “Garrett, thank you for your attention to detail in completing your FD15 Nutrition/Repository session within timeline constraints!  We appreciate your efforts and participation.”

             

PMDIS  (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

             

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

             

SAMPLE:   Last crew sampling  session is currently planned for 4/7.

             

SLEEP  (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    “Peggy, thanks for downloading 1 J/A FE2 and your Actiwatches, as well as initializing the KARI SFP Actiwatch.  You also completed your last targeted week of sleep logging.  Your only remaining scheduled activity is downloading all three Actiwatches and doffing your and KARI SFP Actiwatches.  Thanks for all your additional sleep logging.  The PI greatly appreciates it.” “Garrett, you have competed your first two Sleep activities (Actiwatch Don and 1st download), and are in-process of completing your first week of sleep logging.  Thanks for completing these activities.  Any additional sleep logging is above and beyond, and the PI will greatly appreciate it.”

             

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):   Planned.

             

SPHERES  (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In  progress.  

             

Swab  (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   Complete.

             

TRAC  (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

             

ULTRASOUND:    “Peggy, thank you for  moving and checking out the Ultrasound – we were VERY excited to see if  functioning nominally!”

             

WAICO  #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different  g-levels):    Planned.

             

CEO  (Crew Earth Observation):    Through 4/1, the ground has received a total of 17,049 ISS CEO images for review and cataloging.  Late this week imagery received included sessions with camera times corresponding to the following daily target requests:  Lake Eyre, Australia; Patagonian Glaciers; Somalia Coast; Florida Coastal Everglades; Central Arizona-Phoenix; and Madrean Sky Islands, North America.  We will be providing feedback on these acquisitions as we work through them in the coming week.  This weekend your striking, oblique view of the rugged escarpments, ravines, and peaks of the Semien Mountains of northern Ethiopia will be published on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory site.  Your perspective and illumination provides an excellent contextual view of this World Heritage Site.”

             

No CEO  photo targets uplinked for today.

             

CEO  photography can be studied at this “Gateway” website:
                   http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov  (as of 3/1/08, this database  contained 757,605 views of the Earth from space, with 314,000 from the ISS  alone).

----------------------------------------------

To sum up, more WAICO runs are planned, and experiments in general appear to be overcoming their former problems. A new location for ALTCRISS (radiation monitoring) in Zarya is under consideration.

Another post to follow, this one is growing too big  :)
 

 

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #31 on: 04/06/2008 07:35 PM »

Next topic is a summary found in the main ISS Science page (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/index.html ) is the summary of the experiments returned on the Shuttle, both performed during the mission or brought back:

-------------------------------


 STS123 1J/A Sortie Science (Science Brought and Returned on the Shuttle)
 
 National Lab Pathfinder - Vaccine - 1A (NLP-Vaccine-1A) is a commercial payload serving as a pathfinder for the use of the International Space Station (ISS) as a National Laboratory after ISS assembly is complete. The experiment tests changes caused by spaceflight in Salmonella enterica, a disease-causing organism. The returned samples will be studied for potential use in the development of vaccines against infections on Earth and in microgravity.
 
 Microbial Drug Resistance and Virulence (MDRV) is a microbiological experiment designed to evaluate microbial drug resistance and the mechanisms of virulence (infection potential) in bacterial cultures. This study is a direct result from a previous short-duration experiment, Microbe (Effect of Spaceflight on Microbial Gene Expression and Virulence) that flew on STS-115/12A in September 2006, and demonstrated increased virulence in Salmonella bacteria (a leading cause of human gastroenteritis).
 
 As part of the Department of Defense Space Test Program, a new payload in the Shuttle's Cargo Bay, RIGEX (Rigidizable Inflatable Get-Away-Special Experiment), tested and collected data on rigidized structures. Three tubes, initially soft structures are heated then cooled, forming structurally rigid tubes.
 
 ISS Commander Peggy Whitson and Mission Specialist Takao Doi conducted a session of the JAXA-EPO (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency - Education Payload Observation) where Doi was photographed unstowing and stowing payload samples from a Cargo Transfer Bag (CTB). JAXA-EPO aims to provide educational activities that will enlighten the general public about microgravity research and human space flight.
 
 In support of future exploration missions, some of the Shuttle crew members participated in human studies research. These investigations include:
 
 Integrated Immune-SDBI (Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crew Member Immune Function - Short Duration Biological Investigation) uses blood and saliva samples from the Shuttle crewmembers to assess the clinical risks resulting from the adverse effects of space flight on the human immune system and will validate a flight-compatible immune monitoring strategy.
 
 Midodrine-SDBI (Test of Midodrine as a Countermeasure Against Post-Flight Orthostatic Hypotension) tests the performance of medication that helps transition the human body in and out of spaceflight (prevent space motion sickness and counteract low blood pressure and dizziness upon return to Earth).
 
 Sleep-Short (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight - Short) examines the effects of spaceflight on the sleep-wake cycles of the astronauts during space shuttle missions. Participating crewmembers will wear an Actiwatch monitor that will be track the amount of light exposure and sleep patterns experienced.
 
 Science Samples Returned to Earth
 
 The Shuttle crew is also bringing home key samples from 5 experiments that were operated onboard ISS. Of these experiments, 2 are sponsored by NASA, 2 are sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) and 1 sponsored by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).
 
 Nutrition (Nutrition Status Assessment) is the most comprehensive in-flight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight.
 
 SWAB (Surface, Water and Air Biocharacterization) uses advanced molecular techniques to comprehensively evaluate microbes on board the Space Station, including pathogens (organisms that may cause disease). The data tracks changes in the microbial community as spacecraft visit and new modules are added to the Space Station.
 
 SWAB (Surface, Water and Air Biocharacterization) investigation examines changes in stress and immune responses, during and after long duration missions on the ISS. Immuno is a cooperative investigation with the ESA.
 
 WAICO (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels) uses Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) to study circumnutation (bowing or bending of the root tips in different directions) and gravitropism (growth towards or away from gravity) in microgravity. This investigation is sponsored by ESA and was started by Eyharts when he arrived on the ISS.
 
 JAXA-3DPC (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency-3D Photon Crystals) examines photonic crystals grown in microgravity using particles in electrolytic solutions that will be fixed using light in a process referred to as photocuring.

-------------------------------------------

And some interesting images of Garret and Yuri "weighing" themselves in Zvezda (not strictly science, but it's an eye-catching procedure!)

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-16/inflight/ndxpage31.html

 

Finally, a big thanks to all who have contributed so far, either with new science additions or with comments, to this thread. For the shy ones who may be reading it, think about jumping in with whatever you find interesting or any question, we'll surely learn something while trying to find the answer!

-DaviD-

Offline missinglink

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 102
  • Liked: 14
  • Likes Given: 80
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #32 on: 04/07/2008 06:46 AM »
Quote
For the shy ones who may be reading it, think about jumping in with whatever you find interesting or any question, we'll surely learn something while trying to find the answer!

Thank you very much, you saved me a lot of time that I would have had to spend scouring the Internet for this information!

The questions I would ask are:

(1) How do the scientists involved in the various projects feel about the (apparently) many things going wrong aboard Columbus? Is the proportion of problems/failures more or less expected, or are they disappointed beyond expectation?

(2) Is it too soon for an interim cost/benefit accounting of science aboard the ISS? Are we still primarily in the assembly phase, before emphasis shifts to science work?


Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #33 on: 04/08/2008 03:33 PM »
Lots of news this week! First, some updates by today's Status Report:

It would appear Garret has repaired EMCS that was impacting the Japanese CW/RW experiment:

"After activating the MSG (Microgravity Science Glovebox) facility, the FE-2 continued troubleshooting the EMCS (European Modular Cultivation System) and succeeded in clearing up the problem by determining that the EMCS main door was obstructed by an EMCS laptop cable.  Garrett also straightened out a crimped water line.  EMCS was activated, and hydration of the Japanese CW/RW (Cell Wall/Resist Wall) experiment began.   [CW/RW operates in the EMCS facility in eight special ECs (Experiment Containers) which Garrett recently (3/30) installed on the centrifuges of the facility.  The EMCS rack contains two rotating centrifuges that can support a wide range of small plant & animal experiments under partial gravity conditions.   On Rotor A, the new ECs for CW/RW are EC92 in position A1, EC95 at A2, EC94 at A3, EC96 at A4, on Rotor B - EC97 in position B1, EC99 at B2, EC98 at B3, and EC100 at B4.]"

Also, an update concerning Columbus' systems and scientific facilities:

"Columbus Update:   A replacement delta-P sensor for redundancy in the COL water loops will be manifested soon.  Troubleshooting of the COL condensate water separator blockage is in work with NASA.  An open loop command was sent to the SOLAR payload which is a major step in recovering the payload; the system can now operate on a fixed position to track the sun.  BLB (Biolab) troubleshooting will require removal & replacement of the locking pin; the pin is requested to be manifested on Flight 1J.  ESA is completing procedures for the FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) laser switch checkout; planners will work on when to schedule the activity."
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #34 on: 04/08/2008 04:21 PM »

And, as today's BIG update, the science overview (both follow-ons, as has been posted before, and continuing experiments) for the Increment 17 timeframe, both Russian and American. I don't know where the Japanese and European are, if you find them please link to them here!

All this info is inside the Expedition 17 Press Kit , which can be downloaded clicking on the linked words. I'll just list the experiments and comment the ones which I find more interesting... feel free to add anything relevant!

  • US Experiments:
    • Human Sciences:
      • Elaboratore Immagini Televisivi - Space 2 (ELITE-2) with the Italian Space Agency.
      • Space Flight Induced Reactivation of Latent Epstein Barr Virus.
      • Integrated Immune.
      • Journals.
      • Midrodrine-Long.
      • NUTRITION.
      • Repository.
      • Stability, to study how stable drugs and medicines stay in space.
    • Material Sciences and Spacecraft Engineering:
      • LOCAD-PTS, to monitor chemicals onboard in an efficient way.
      • MAMS & SAMS II, to monitor accelerations and vibrations.
      • MISSE 6 A & B.
    • Biology and Physics Experiments:
      • Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2. Commented a few posts ago.
      • Optimization of Root Zone Substrates.
      • Shear History Extensional Rheology Expermiment (SHERE), study of the strain and stress response of a polymer fluid, applicable to adhesives for space, fabrication of spacecraft parts and various Earth-based processes.
    • Educational:
      • CEO
      • CEO/IPY (that is, Earth Observation for the Polar Year)
      • Earth-KAM.
    • Shuttle-scheduled experiments:
      • Vaccine-1B: carries an ill organism (wonder what that is) and monitors how it develops in space. Oriented as pathfinder for use of ISS as National US Lab.
      • Integrated Immune-SDBI.
      • Sleep-Short.
    • RESERVE (now I know what Reserve means: that they're only performed or run if time is available, but they're there just in case):
      • ANITA.
      • BCAT-3/4: more colloidal studies, only possible to perform in zero-G, as some processes are masked by gravity-driven phenomena.
      • EPO.
      • Sleep-Long.
      • SPHERES.
  •  Russian Experiments:
    • Commercial:
      • GTS-2: concerning Global Time Systems.
    • Biomedical:
      • Kardio-ODNT: cardiovascular experiments in zero-G.
      • Profilaktika: preventing locomotor system problems in space.
      • Sonokard: noice alterations study.
      • Pilot: psichologic study aimed at proffesional skills.
      • Vsaimodeystvie: group activity control.
      • Dykhanie: respiration and biomechanics.
      • Pneumokard: cardiovascular and respiratory systems study.
      • BIMS: Statistical study of biomedical parameters stored in onboard computers.
      • Biorisk: Currently outside Pirs, studies survivability of microorganisms in space.
      • Aquarium: closed ecological environment (à-la-Biospheres?) development study in space. Sounds interesting.
      • Rasteniya: Growth and development of higher plants.
      • Plazmida: Study of bacteria plasmids.
      • Prognoz: Radiation dosage.
      • Matrieshka-R: Radiation study with antropomorphic "phantoms".
    • Biotech:
      • Glycoproteid: study of glycoproteins in virus.
      • Mimetik-K: Something concerning antibodies... strange translation!
      • KAF: Protein crystallization.
      • Vaktsina: AIDS vaccine investigation. Wouldn't it be nice they discovered it in space? :)
      • Interleukin-K: concerning interleukins, no idea what they are.
      • Laktolen, ARIL and OChB: Medicines study.
      • Biotrack: Radiation by charged particles effects in cells.
      • Conjugation: Study of reproduction by conjugation.
      • Biodegradatsiya: study to obtain biomass and bioactive substances without human input. Interesting for long-duration spaceflight, like Mars expeditions!
      • Astrovaktsina: Cultivation of E-Coli bacteria.
      • Zhenshen-2: increase in biological effects of ginseng (Chinese experiment?)
      • Antigen: study of viral hepatitis.
    • Technology and Materials:
      • Kristallizator
    • Geophysics:
      • Uragan.
      • Vsplesk. To be installed during next Russian EVA, to monitor solar seismic events.
      • Relaksatsiya: plasma interaction with jet plumes in the upper mesosphere.
    • Ecology and Earth monitoring:
      • Diatomea: study of biollogically active waters in the oceans.
    • Technical Studies:
      • Vektor-T: study to predict ISS movements.
-DaviD-

Offline edfishel

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 150
  • Liked: 19
  • Likes Given: 66
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #35 on: 04/08/2008 04:56 PM »
DaviD --

Thank you! These summaries are terrific and I wonder if you have invented a new blog for the future in cooperation with our blog grandmaster Chris.  It's fun just to follow the work...the trouble-shooting..the successes...as they push the frontier of knowledge.

Ed

Offline Kel

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1250
  • Minneapolis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #36 on: 04/08/2008 05:40 PM »
Quote
eeergo - 8/4/2008  11:21 AM
Mimetik-K: Something concerning antibodies... strange translation!

I haven't worked as a Medical Technologist for more than a decade so I'm a little out of the loop, but here's a rough guess:

Anti-idiotypic antibodies have antigenic properties, which are useful for diagnostics as well as developing vaccines (see http://www.devicelink.com/ivdt/archive/97/03/005.html) . Adjuvant-active glycoproteins have been used as a form of immunotherapy in some types of cancers (with varying degree of success). Mimetic refers to something that imitates.

Probaby trying to develop:
a) more effective diagnostic technique for identifying disease at an earlier stage.
b) more effective immunotherapy for treating certain types of cancer tumor cells or infectious diseases.
c) a vaccine to prevent certain diseases (ie cancer, infectious disease, etc) from developing in the first place.

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #37 on: 04/08/2008 07:44 PM »
Thanks for the comments Ed, and for your insights Kel!

However, I'm afraid my work is light years away from Chris', he knows how to dive into information and collate the best of it every day for us to enjoy and wonder! But agreed it's real fun to follow these inspiring achievements and little problems in orbit, in a way that would be impossible with a ground-based laboratory. I learn a lot summarizing, too, altough sometimes I dedicate more time than I should to it... I can't help it, it's much more interesting than numerical integration and groups theory ;)
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #38 on: 04/13/2008 01:02 PM »

New and interesting updates about scientific experiments aboard ISS: according to yesterday's report, Cell Wall/Resist Wall (talked about in previous posts) is not performing entirely as expected, although it's not clear if this is due to the hardware in BioLab or to the experiment itself:

Garrett continued his support of the Japanese CW/RW (Cell Wall/Resist Wall) experiment in the MSG EMCS (Microgravity Science Glovebox/European Modular Cultivation System), swapping the ECs (Experiment Containers) on rotor A in order to save as much science as possible for CW/RW - which has been having problems with the hydration.    [CW/RW operates in the EMCS facility in eight special ECs (Experiment Containers) which Garrett recently (3/30) installed on the centrifuges of the facility.  The EMCS rack contains two rotating centrifuges, Rotor A & Rotor B, that can support a wide range of small plant & animal experiments under partial gravity conditions.]

Also, there's some info about So-Yeon Yi's experiments:

 So-Yeon  Yi’s busy schedule today included work on -

             
  • KAP02/Identification of fruit fly genes responsive to gravity and responsible  for aging (monitoring, video recording,  later stowing),
  • KAP04/SFP medical monitoring (taking four measurements of ocular pressure  during the day);
  • KAP06/Study of the possibility of using traditional Korean food in onboard food rations (testing during crew Breakfast & Dinner),
  • KAP07/Growth of Zeolite crystals, super crystals, and crystal layers in  microgravity (equipment transfer, assembly,  setup in SM, activating oven with samples A,B,C, several temperature checks),
  • KAP08/Synthesis of metal-organic porous materials in microgravity (hardware transfer, assembly and setup, installation of first sample, oven  activation, and temperature check),
  • KAP09/High-resolution telescope (ELT) and study of micro-electro-mechanical  system (MEMS) for next generation telescopes (mounting equipment at SM window 9, activation, video recording, filling out questionnaire, deactivation, gear removal from window),
  • KAP13/Measurements using the South-Korean developed SMMS (Small Mass  Measurement System, later termination & cleanup),
  • KAP15/Recording scenes of daily life &  activities of the SFP, using Samsung Gx-10 and Samsung NV11 cameras.

The Russian science program appears to be getting experiments that require more crew input:

Major science activities in the Russian segment (RS) by Kononenko, with Volkov taking photo/video imagery, today focused on the biotechnological experiments BIOEMULSION and PLAZMIDA.     [BIOEMULSION (BTKh-14):  setting up incubator in Bioreactor, activation of mixing mode for culturing.  PLAZMIDA (BIO-8):  Removing Recomb-K hardware from KRIOGEM-3 at +37degC, activating mobilization and setting up in KRIOGEM-3M thermostat at +4degC, supported by ground specialist tagup. ]

             

Kononenko transferred a new kit for the “Matryoshka-R” (RBO-3-2) radiation payload suite from Soyuz TMA-12 to the ISS for installation in the RS.    [The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Three detectors now in use are positioned in spherical “Phantom” containers in the DC1, four in the stbd crew cabin, under the work table, and behind a panel (#327).]

And, in the next post I will copy and comment the Weekly Science Update (very interesting this week!) because this present post is growing too long! 

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 424
  • Likes Given: 342
RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #39 on: 04/13/2008 01:12 PM »

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 25)          

             

ALTCRISS  (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Completed.  Instrument was relocated to FGB for Inc17 measurements (as Russian experiment) and ALTCRISS was re-activated on 4/8.

             

ANITA:   Completed.

             

BCAT-3  (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

             

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

             

CCISS  (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

             

CFE  (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

             

CW/CR (Cell Wall/Resist Wall) in EMCS  (European Modular Cultivation System) :    The CW/RW Experiment Containers located in EMCS EC position A1, A2, B1 and B2 could not be hydrated due to EMCS Water Supply Subsystem problems.  Troubleshooting is ongoing.

             

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA  Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In  progress.

             

CGBA-2  (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

             

CSLM-2  (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

             

EarthKAM  (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

             

ELITE-S2  (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.

             

EPO  (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

             

ETD  (Eye Tracking Device):   Last  session (4th) was successfully performed on 4/6.

             

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):    EuTEF  platform is nominal.  DEBIE-2:  Link error still under investigation;  DOSTEL:  On-going science acquisition;  EuTEMP:  Currently inactive as planned;  EVC:  so far further troubleshooting could not be performed due to too low EVC  temperature;  EXPOSE: On-going  science acquisition;  FIPEX: 6-day measurements period with sensors RAM1, RAM4 and ZENITH8 started on 4/8.  On 4/10, the sensors turned off suddenly.  Under further investigation;  MEDET: On-going science acquisition;  PLEGPAY: on 4/10, experiment 1 run was  nominally performed;  TRIBOLAB: on 4/10 the instrument was commanded in Thermal Stabilisation mode in preparation of the first experiment run.  On  4/11, the first TRIBOLAB Pin On Disk (POD1) has been started and will run until Soyuz undock.

             

Fluid  Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL  Facility awaits further troubleshooting after 1J/A departure.

             

GEOFLOW:   Deferred.  Start of GEOFLOW is pending further FSL troubleshooting/commissioning activities but is not expected in Inc16 anymore.

             

IMMUNO  (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term  Stay at ISS):       Second session has currently started, to run  from 4/12 through 4/15.

             

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from  Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In  progress.

             

Integrated  Immune:  “Peggy, thank you for unstowing Garrett’s saliva kit and having it ready for him to begin his collections.  Garrett, we appreciate your efforts during your early increment Integrated Immune session.”

             

KUBIK-FM1/  KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Completed.

             

LOCAD-PTS  (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

             

MISSE  (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

             

MTR-2  (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive  dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

             

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

             

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

             

NOA-2  (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):     Planned.

             

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    “Peggy, the Nutrition/Repository PI teams want to say thank you for your fantastic support throughout all five sessions and for the addition of the extra tube during this last activity!”

             

PMDIS  (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

             

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

             

SAMPLE:   Last crew sampling session for Inc16 FE-1 Malenchenko was successfully performed on 4/7.  Samples were inserted in MELFI Dewar 4.

             

SLEEP  (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    “Peggy, thanks for downloading 1 J/A FE2 and your Actiwatches, as well as initializing the KARI SFP Actiwatch.  You also completed your last targeted week of sleep logging.  Your only remaining scheduled activity is downloading all three Actiwatches and doffing your and KARI SFP Actiwatches.  Thanks for all your additional sleep logging.  The PI greatly appreciates it.” “Garrett, you have competed your first two Sleep activities (Actiwatch Don and 1st download), and are in-process of completing your first week of sleep logging.  Thanks for completing these activities.  Any additional sleep logging is above and beyond, and the PI will greatly appreciate it.”

             

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    On 4/4, SOLAR was commanded to SIMUL-PM (Pointing Mode (SIMUL-PM) using Station Ancillary data to find the Sun to allow science data acquisition.  Sun tracking precision has been estimated to be sufficient to perform science measurements.  Problems with ancillary data were observed on 4/9.  The anomaly is under investigation.  SOVIM: Science data acquisition  on-going nominally since 4/4;  SOLSPEC: To allow for sun tracking precision assessment, sun observations were performed on 4/5 after start of SIMUL-PM mode.  Commissioning of instrument has been successfully completed on 4/8 and 4/9.  SOLSPEC measurements are planned on 4/14-15 in order to cross-compare with Sun instrument on NASA Sounding Rocket launched on 4/14 (12:58pm EDT);  SOLACES: Commissioning completion planned for 4/11.  SOLACES measurements are planned on 4/13-14 in order to cross-compare with Sun instrument on NASA Sounding Rocket on 4/17 (12:58pm).

             

SPHERES  (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In  progress. 

             

Swab  (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   Complete.

             

TRAC  (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

             

ULTRASOUND:    “Peggy, thank you for  moving and checking out the Ultrasound – we were VERY excited to see if  functioning nominally!”

             

WAICO  #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different  g-levels):    Planned.

             

CEO  (Crew Earth Observation):    Through 4/8 the ground has received a total of 17,604 ISS CEO images for review and cataloging.  Late this week imagery received included sessions with camera times corresponding to the following daily target requests:  Teide Volcano, Canary Islands; Volcan Colima, Mexico; Afar Rift Zone, Ethiopia; Calcutta India; and East Haruj Megafans, Libya.   The ground specialists will provide feedback on these acquisitions as they work through them in the coming week.   “Feedback on last week’s acquisitions includes:  Lake Eyre, Australia – excellent coverage, best in many months, suggests moist conditions are returning;  Somalia Coast – excellent mapping pass – dry conditions persist as expected – all requirement for this target have been met;  Central Arizona-Phoenix – well-focused imagery of much of this target was acquired, but more nadir-looking views will be requested in the future; and the Madrean Sky Islands, northern Mexico – we will continue to work with you to help recognize and acquire imagery of these features.  Your recent image of the bizarre landscape of the western Saudi Arabian lava field know as the Harrat Khaybar will be published on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory site this weekend.  Your photo highlights the spectacular landforms, diverse mineralogy, and climate of this volcanic region.  Good eye!  Thanks for your good imagery response to our target requests.  Any additional feedback you find time to provide on this activity would be most welcome!”

             

CEO photo targets uplinked for today were Eastern Tien Shan Mts., China (regional contextual images of the eastern half of the range were requested.  These will assist in gaining more detailed views of permanent ice caps on this range that are being studied for the effects of climate change), South Tibesti Megafans (an extensive network of dry, non-functioning stream channels occupies a large area south of the Tibesti Mts [probably dating from the last wet period in the Sahara Desert ~10, 000 years ago].  These channel networks appear to be good analogs for river-like lines on Mars.  Overlapping images right of track on the nearer of two megafans were requested), Sky Islands, northern Mexico/SW USA (the crew was to shoot a mapping swath right of track.   “Sky Islands” are the higher elevations of mountains in Mexico’s Sierra Madre ranges and the US Southwest which are cool and moist enough for dense forests to flourish.  The forested peaks appear as green “islands” in the deserts, mainly of northern Mexico, but also in the US Southwest.  The sky islands boast some of the richest biodiversity anywhere in North America.  To start this round of change documentation the ground requested broad views looking right of track), and Sevilleta Wildlife Area, New Mexico (the Sevilleta LTER [Long Term Ecological Research] Project is located about 80 kilometers south of Albuquerque, New Mexico.  The crew was to shoot a mapping swath just right of track, immediately after the Sky Islands target.  The Refuge is of great interest because it falls at the geographic intersection of several major biotic zones:  Chihuahuan Desert grassland and shrubland to the south, Great Plains grassland to the north, Piñon-Juniper woodland on the neighboring mountains, Colorado Plateau shrub-steppe to the west, and riverbank vegetation along the middle Rio Grande Valley).

             

CEO photography can be studied at this  “Gateway” website:
                   http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov  (as of 3/1/08, this database contained 757,605 views of the Earth from  space, with 314,000 from the ISS alone).

--------------------------------------

Basically, they note the problem with CW/RW, there are still some glitches affecting the experiments in EuTEF, but some others are coming online, like Tribolab (Spanish experiment I learned the other day!) GEOFLOW continues to wait until some time can be allocated to FSL troubleshooting (I hope they get time before 1J...)

Apparently, SOLAR's experiment also comprises a ground segment, with sounding rocket launches, I suppose to monitor magnetospheric and space weather activity. Still some glitches with its systems, but the solar tracking precision is considered "sufficient to perform science measurements" Lots of photos for CEO also have been taken this week. 

-DaviD-

Tags: