Author Topic: Science Experiments in the ISS  (Read 177003 times)

Offline eeergo

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Science Experiments in the ISS
« on: 02/26/2008 09:15 PM »

There was some talk in the recent poll to expand the forum about creating a dedicated science section for ISS. I don't think we have too many inside sources working in ISS science to justify a new forum (although there are some science guys here who I feel honoured to share posts with), but I'd like to start a dedicated thread to be updated by whoever finds something and wants to share it. Maybe I'm wrong and there are tons of scientists looming here just waiting to talk about their experiments :) If so, please write as much as you can!

Anyway, here's the news that made me create this: an article about IMMUNO's role to monitor the crew's general health before, during, and after flight.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/integrated_immune.html

[...] While previous studies conducted immediately after landing show dramatic changes in crew members' immune systems, the Integrated Immune experiment, or by its long name: the Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crew Member Immune Function experiment is the only study to comprehensively monitor the human immune system before, during and after spaceflight. Dr. Clarence Sams at the Johnson Space Center in Houston is the principal investigator for the study that will determine the clinical risks due to the adverse effects of spaceflight on immunity and confirm an immune-monitoring strategy. [...]

I will also post some general links, as a general one-stop section for ISS science (there are many more outside-NASA links, of course, I'm only linking the most obvious ones)

General ISS Science: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/index.html
Weekly (with some delay) Science update: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/Summary.html
Publications: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/Publications.html
List of all experiments performed by all expeditions (you can also search alphabetically and chronologically): http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/Expedition.html

Any comments and additions greatly appreciated, as I won't be always able to contribute periodically! And, of course, any insider comment will be invaluable!

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #1 on: 02/26/2008 09:31 PM »
<p>I forgot an important resource for knowing what's happening daily on the ISS: the Status Reports (http://spaceoperations.nasa.gov/iss_reports/archive_reports.htm), which also list, each Saturday, a summary of the status of all scientific activities onboard, and some notes from ground investigators or unexpected events. The last one was:</p><p>---------------------------------------------------</p><p><strong>Weekly Science Update</strong> (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 18)           </p><p>ALTCRISS (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module.  Memory card exchange has been successfully performed on 2/15. </p><p>ANITA:   Completed.</p><p>BCAT-3 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   The ground is presently working to schedule an activity to get the orientation of the stowed sample module rotated.  This is to reduce the possibility of a bubble migrating through some of the samples when they are being stowed and equilibrating for six months.  The stowage procedure is being updated to reflect this desire for future operations. </p><p>CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.</p><p>CCISS (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.</p><p>CFE (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.</p><p>CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In progress.</p><p>CGBA-2 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.</p><p>CSLM-2 (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress. </p><p>EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.</p><p>ELITE-S2 (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.</p><p>EPO (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.</p><p>ETD (Eye Tracking Device):   Third session successfully performed on 2/14.</p><p>EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):  EuTEF has been successfully installed on COL External Platform during EVA-3 on 2/15 (FD9).  During Week#18, 9 out of 9 instruments have been progressively checked out from ground with success.  Two instruments (PLEGPAY and EXPOSE-E) have already been fully commissioned.  At EuTEF platform level, troubleshooting is underway on some software issues with the DHPU MMU (Data Handling & Power Unit Mass Memory Unit), so that scripts can be loaded to operate the EuTEF platform in an automated way.  The full commissioning of the remaining instruments will continue during Week #19 and the science program will begin during Week #20. </p><p>GEOFLOW:  Hardware launched on 1E. The FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) facility commissioning continues for a couple of days by Leo Eyharts, and it is currently planned to start the GEOFLOW science program during Week #20.</p><p>IMMUNO (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term Stay at ISS):    In progress.</p><p>InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2):    Completed 30 runs since the start of InSPACE-2.  Three runs were completed on 2/19 which were performed nominally.  These runs explored the low frequency response of the fluid.  A progression to much larger structures with increasing field strength was observed.  The final structures at the end of the last run exhibited large field distortion effects when it pulsed.</p><p>Integrated Immune:   Peggy’s and Leo’s participation in the STS-122 (1E) Integrated Immune session is appreciated! </p><p>KUBIK-FM1/ KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:   Troubleshooting of the centrifuge/incubator was performed successfully on 2/15 and 2/16.  The test demonstrated that the temperature can be set between +37degC and +6degC, and the KUBIK-FM3 is fully functional.  Telemetry has been downlinked and is under analysis by the KUBIK Payload Developer (PD). </p><p>LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete. </p><p>MISSE (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.</p><p>MTR-2 (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.</p><p>MULTIGEN-1:    MULTIGEN-1 samples have been downloaded on STS-122 (1E) and will now be analyzed on the ground.. </p><p>MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete. </p><p>NOA-2 (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):    Planned.</p><p>NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    In progress..  </p><p>PMDIS (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.</p><p>SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing. </p><p>SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    The ground appreciates Peggy’s completion of the download/initialization activity off the task list.   Her remaining scheduled activities include monthly downloads, two more weeks of sleep logging, and doffing the Actiwatch.  Also appreciated is the additional sleep logging.  “Peggy, you continue to go above and beyond and the PI greatly appreciates it.” </p><p>SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    SOLAR has been successfully installed on COL External Platform during EVA-3 on 2/15 (FD9). Some software glitches have been repeatedly encountered with the Sun Pointing Device platform, and are currently under investigation.  Some anomalies have also been encountered with a sub-system of the SOVIM instrument, which had to be power cycled.  The SOLAR instruments are currently outgassing (nominal activity), before the science program is started. </p><p>SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In progress.  </p><p>Swab (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   In progress.</p><p>TRAC (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.</p><p>ULTRASOUND:   In progress.</p><p>WAICO #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels):   WAICO#1 hardware launched on 1E.  WAICO#1 items (ATCS with chemicals, Cultivation Box Bowls with Agar) transferred to MELFI on 2/10 (FD4). Two transfer activities of 2 x 4 WAICO-#1 Seeds containers to MELFI have been performed on 2/11 to start Arabidopsis seeds vernalization phase.  The BIOLAB commissioning is nearing completion.  The transfer of cold stowed items from MELFI to BIOLAB was completed yesterday (2/22), and WAICO#1 experiment is currently planned to start on 02/26. </p><p>CEO (Crew Earth Observation):  Ongoing.</p><p>CEO photo targets uplinked for today were <strong>Dhaka</strong><strong>, Bangladesh</strong> (the population of greater Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, is 11 million, making it the 11th largest city on Earth.  Images of the margins of the city are requested.  The city can be hard to identify: the crew was to start looking right as ISS passed over the very wide Brahmaputra River on the India-Bangladesh border.  Then they were to look on a branch river nearer track than the Brahmaputra), <strong>Ganges River Delta</strong> (fast change of river course location and island shape typify this major world delta.  Requested was a mapping swath of overlapping images aimed right of track.  An extreme example of fast change was the sudden appearance offshore of New Moore Island [3.5 km long] in 1970.  The island appeared immediately after the storm surge and floods generated by Cyclone Bhola in November 1970.  This cyclone, although only a category 3 storm, was the most destructive on record.  It caused the movement of vast amounts of sediment.  The island continues to grow), and <strong>East Haruj Megafans, Libya</strong> (ISS passed over the center of this remote Saharan target.  A mapping swath taken near nadir was requested.  The almost featureless desert landforms of these “desert flats” have been recently recognized as vast spreads of river sediment [megafans].  The sediment has been transported hundreds of km from the Tibesti Mts. far to the south.  Now-dry river courses can be traced from the mountains.  These rivers undoubtedly flowed during wet climate phases in the past.)</p><p>CEO photography can be viewed and studied at the websites:
<a title="http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/" href="http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/">http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov [/url] (about 700,000 NASA digital photographs of Earth are downloaded by the public each month from this “Gateway” site);
<a title="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/" href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/">http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/ [/url]
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Study/AstronautPhotography </p><p>--------------------------------------------</p>
« Last Edit: 07/02/2008 09:41 PM by Chris Bergin »
-DaviD-

Offline marshallsplace

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #2 on: 02/27/2008 08:00 PM »
Thanks eeergo for setting up this thread. The NASA links are indeed interesting but must be only the start.

I am waiting (or haven't found) ESA Columbus science pages (I know it's early days but a "watch this space" idea would be a good idea for all interested parties).  Same goes for JAXA.

It would be great if this site attracts relevant scientists to contribute directly........  :)

Offline Jim

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #3 on: 02/27/2008 09:35 PM »
The link eeergo posted covers all experiment on the ISS

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #4 on: 02/29/2008 05:47 PM »
News about the first experiment starting in Columbus: WAICO (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis at Different G-levels, not sure in what language!) It's a plant growth experiment like many performed in the past, or just now, I think it's mostly a trial run experiment with marginal results, to check all the systems are performing well and have the first hands-on experience. Anyway, it's studying gravitotropism, or the way plants grow depending on the gravity they're enduring. Samples are coming down in STS-123.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM7HZJ26DF_index_0.html

More info about it in the NASA ISS science page:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/WAICO.html
-DaviD-

Offline Jeff Bingham

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #5 on: 03/01/2008 01:50 PM »
This is a great idea for a thread. I do want to offer a couple of reminders to folks, though, to try to maintain perspective, because I have heard all too many folks say things like "the space station has been up for seven years and we haven't seen much in the way of science."

Sort of like living in a partly-finished house with no kitchen yet, and complaining that all you get is a bar-b-que and occasional picnics.

The space station's full laboratory and scientific capabilities are still not THERE. The US lab is only partially filled with the level of research facilities it is capable of supporting, the Columbus lab just arrived, and is still getting checked out with only very preliminary experimentation available, and the Kibo won't get there until next month. Equally significant is the fact that there will not be a six-person crew until around this time next year, and over the past seven years the primary allocation of crew time has been for assembly and maintenance duties, with relatively little time for research in very limited research facilities. The station won't be fully assembled and "complete" for two more years, so judgments about its scientific utility should be kept in perspective.

The other thing to remember is that NASA's research plans and use for the ISS are rather narrow in the VSE context, and focused on long-duration human spaceflight issues, apart from the 15% of their research that Congress requires them to conduct in "non-exploration" fields of science. But the capabilities of even the US Segment of ISS far exceed the need NASA now has, so the Congress has established a National Laboratory mechanism to enable that "surplus" capability to be used by non-NASA entities.  NASA has already signed on Memorandum of Understanding with the National Institutes of Health regarding uses of the National Laboratory and  similar MOUs are under negotiation with other US governmental agencies such as USDA, NSF, Department of Energy, NIST, etc., as well as a number of private sector research organizations. All that is targeted on utilization of station for research in the post-2010 period.

In the meantime, research activity will be limited and somewhat narrow in scope, though there are already some pretty impressive and interesting scientific results generated so far, as this thread and links will hopefully illustrate.  Just wanted to throw this in to help keep this kind of discussion in perspective.
Offering only my own views and experience as a long-time "Space Cadet."

Offline anik

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #6 on: 03/01/2008 02:30 PM »
Science Research On ISS Russian Segment
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/iss-researches.html

Human Life Research
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/medic.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Geophysical Research
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/geophis.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Earth Resources Sensing
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/priroda.html
Read more about these experiments on the left

Space Biotechnology
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/space-bio.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Technical Research
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/techn.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Integrated Analysis And Program Formation
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/analiz.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Contract Activities
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/works.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Study Of Cosmic Rays
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/ray.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Educational And Humanitarian Projects
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/education.shtml
Read more about these experiments on the left

Space Technology And Material Science
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/materiology.html
Read more about these experiments on the left

Problems Of Space Power Systems
http://www.energia.ru/eng/iss/researches/techn-11.shtml

Offline edfishel

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #7 on: 03/01/2008 08:52 PM »
This is great. Thank you!
Ed

Offline eeergo

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #8 on: 03/02/2008 01:08 PM »

Another weekly science update in the today's Status Report. This week has been specially active with the InSPACE-2 experiment (to study the behaviour of magnetic fluids in microgravity), the Matrioshka experiment (with models of human torsos to study radiation levels) and the start of WAICO. The first experiment in the Fluid Science Laboratory in Columbus (GEOFLOW) is scheduled to start this coming weed. Also note SOLAR appears to be having its share of problems...

----------------------------------------------------

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 19)          

ALTCRISS (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module. Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module.  The latest memory card exchange occurred yesterday (2/29).

ANITA:   Completed.

BCAT-3 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

CCISS (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

CFE (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In progress.

CGBA-2 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

CSLM-2 (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

ELITE-S2 (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.

EPO (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

ETD (Eye Tracking Device):   In progress.

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):   On 02/26, the EuTEF MMU (Mass Memory Unit) troubleshooting procedure has been successfully performed and DHPU (Data Handling & Power Unit) full functionality has been recovered.  To date, 8 out of 9 instruments have been checked out from ground, mostly successfully but with some anomalies under assessment.  On 2/27, EuTEF platform had to be powered down (“graceful shutdown”) after some erroneous TM (telemetry) was encountered.  After power cycling, situation is back to nominal.  The EuTEF science program via scripts will begin soon.

Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL Facility commissioning continues this week and next week, with the following look-ahead activities for Week 20: - Last mechanical configuration;- First Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) Rack activation and software upgrade;- Optical check-out activities;- GEOFLOW Experiment Container (EC) insertion into FSL; - GEOFLOW check-out activities; - First GEOFLOW science runs.

IMMUNO (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term Stay at ISS):    In progress.

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In progress.

Integrated Immune:  In progress.

KUBIK-FM1/ KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Following troubleshooting activities performed during Week 17, telemetry has been downlinked and analysed by KUBIK PD (Payload Developer).  All is nominal.

LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

MISSE (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

MTR-2 (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

NOA-2 (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):    Planned.

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    “Leo, thank you for your attention to detail in completing the FD15 Nutr/Rep session.  The information conveyed via crew notes was very helpful.” 

PMDIS (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    In progress.

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    Some software glitches have been repeatedly encountered with the Sun Pointing Device platform, and are currently under investigation. Temperature and power monitoring is ongoing and reported as nominal. Some anomalies have also been encountered with a sub-system (DIARAD) of the SOVIM instrument, which had to be powered off until further assessment. The SOLAR instruments are currently outgassing, and some calibrations of the SOLSPEC instrument lamps and some Command Schedules for SOL-ACES are performed before the science program is started.

SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In progress. 

Swab (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   In progress.

TRAC (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

ULTRASOUND:   In progress.

WAICO #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels):    “Thanks Leo for your great work in setting up this first BIOLAB experiment!  WAICO is now running autonomously in the Incubator.  We encountered a silent Caution yesterday late night during the activation of the experiment, triggered by slightly too high O2 concentration in the LSM (Life Support Module).  We have now recovered the temperature, centrifuge, illumination and humidity controls; we expect no major science impacts so far. The nominal growth period is 14 days, and we will continue to monitor the plants on a daily basis.”

CEO (Crew Earth Observation):  Through 2/26 the ground has received a total of 15,305 frames of ISS/CEO imagery for review and cataloging.  “After the break for STS-122 support, we are currently working through requested sessions for:  South Tibesti Megafans; East Venezuela Land Use; Lake Nasser, Toshka Lakes, Egypt; Pilcomayo River Dynamics, Argentina; and the Ganges River Delta.  We hope to provide feedback in the coming weeks.  We have received only 137 new images since the recent crew change and look forward to more.  Your recent, incredibly detailed view of Perth-Amboy, New Jersey will be published on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory Website this weekend.”

CEO photo targets uplinked for today were Lahore, Pakistan (weather was predicted to be clear for this nadir pass over the city of Lahore.  Lahore is the second largest city in Pakistan, and is located on the banks of the River Ravi.  Overlapping nadir mapping frames, taken along-track, were requested to capture a rural-urban-rural transect as ISS crossed the city from NW to SE), Florida Coastal Everglades, FL (this LTER [Long Term Ecological Research] site monitors the Everglades, Florida's "river of grass".  Extensive human alteration of the surface hydrology of the region has produced numerous impacts on the Everglades' flora and fauna.  ISS had a nadir pass along the southwestern coast of Florida; overlapping mapping frames of the coastal wetlands were requested), Central-Arizona Phoenix, AZ (ISS orbit track passed over the southwestern portion of the Phoenix metropolitan area - currently the focus of development in this important southwestern urban center.  Study of the ecological changes that accompany urbanization in an arid climate is the focus of the Central Arizona-Phoenix LTER site. High resolution nadir frames acquired along track are useful for monitoring land use/land cover change resulting from urban development), and Madrean Sky Islands, N. America (the Madrean sky islands are enclaves of Madrean pine-oak woodlands, found at higher elevations in a complex of small mountain ranges in southern Arizona and New Mexico and northern Mexico.  The sky islands are surrounded at lower elevations by the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts.  Overlapping nadir mapping frames of the mountain summits and ridgelines, taken along track, were requested).

---------------------------------------------------

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #9 on: 03/04/2008 04:14 PM »

As is always the case with new Shuttle missions, STS-123 brings a whole lot of new science (and even more so considering it's bringing a new laboratory section) I'll write down some general information about the science parts of this upcoming mission. To know more details, check the Press Kit (in the Payload Overview and Experiments sections)

  • The first Japanese experiment to be performed after this flight (there's been some research before in Zvezda and I think in Destiny too) is plant growth: CELL WALL and RESIST WALL, in Columbus' EMCS. Its purpose is to verify the development of rigid walls and resistance to gravity in Arabipdosis. Another first-run experiment which won't bring breakthoughs as it's been done before in some variant. Samples coming back in 124.
  • Also a more relaxed experiment: development of clothing for astronauts :)
  • The well known DTO experiment for tile repair with ablator material STA-54.
  • Another DTO, now to characterize better the higher CO2 concentration areas in the Shuttle.
  • Landing with crosswinds if possible and desirable (DTO 805)
  • They will continue the on-going research with IMMUNO, both performing new runs and bringing back samples.
  • Tests with the Midodrine and Promethazine drugs for dizziness in space or when coming back.
  • More MAUI observations from Hawaii of the Shuttle's exhaust.
  • Sleep experiments in the Shuttle crew (complemented with those performed by the ISS crew)
  • The RIGEX payload (inflatable and rigidizable tubes)
  • Samples coming down:
    - IMMUNO (as I said before)
    - NUTRITION
    - WAICO (which started only a few days ago, those little plants won't get too much growing...)
    -SWAB.
  • New experiments delivered:
    - The CELL and RESIST WALL experiment mentioned before.
    - BCAT-4 (colloidal crystals arrangements in microgravity)
    - LOCAD-PTS.
    - Midodrine as mentioned before.
    - MISSE-6A and 6B, for materials exposure. They will be stored in the nadir Columbus PEF.
  • And two new science racks in the JEM PS:
    - Saibo (biology and life sciences rack)
    - Ryutai (physics experiments sub-racks supporter)

Lots of science coming up :)

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #10 on: 03/04/2008 08:17 PM »
Anomalies in FSL in Columbus noted in today's ISS Status Reports:

"FSL Anomalies:  After Leo Eyharts successfully completed yesterday’s FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) activities in the Columbus moduke and Col-CC/Oberpfaffenhofen established TCS (Thermal Control System) flow to the rack, it was observed that the mass flow rate into the rack was 6 kg/hrs less than the nominal flow rate.  Additionally, when Col-CC powered up the rack auxiliary power, no power draw was evident.  When ground controllers re-attempted commanding the FSL rack to ON, a short current draw was observed which then returned to zero.  FSL was powered off last night, and ground teams went to work determining a forward plan."
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #11 on: 03/06/2008 10:55 PM »
Another update in Columbus' status in today's report... looks like there's problems in all the activated (or undergoing activation) racks and experiments, except the BioLab. But they seem to be glitches rather than serious problems:

COL Status:   (1) FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) troubleshooting by Eyharts and Col-CC (Columbus Control Center/Oberpfaffenhofen) has identified the cause of the facility’s startup failure to be a cable harness disconnected from a connector.  While Eyharts may be asked to try recrimping the connector to allow its plugging in, ground specialists are already at work to construct a replacement harness in time to be launched on 1J/A next week.  (2) GEOFLOW cannot be started without the FSL being powered up first.  (3) On 3/10 (Monday), the high-priority BIOLAB/WAICO  greenhouse plant growth experiment is coming to an end of its two-week period.  (4) Both external payloads, EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility) & SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory), are running but have developed problems that are being worked.  (5)  Last night, Col-CC lost all communications with COL, remaining totally without comm until ~8:00am CET (Central European Time) this morning when the not-yet-understood problem was corrected.

-DaviD-

Offline Patriot1776

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #12 on: 03/07/2008 01:40 AM »
Please keep this thread updated.  I have little to no knowledge about the science experiments going on on the ISS.  Thank you for starting this thread!!

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #13 on: 03/09/2008 05:06 PM »

Another weekly update on the experiments has been released today (http://spaceoperations.nasa.gov/iss_reports/archive_reports.htm select March 8)

----------------------------------------------

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 20)          

ALTCRISS (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module. Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module.  The latest memory card exchange occurred on 2/29.

ANITA:   Completed.

BCAT-3 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

CCISS (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

CFE (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In progress.

CGBA-2 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

CSLM-2 (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

ELITE-S2 (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Planned.

EPO (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

ETD (Eye Tracking Device):   In progress.

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):   On 3/3 EuTEF was successfully rebooted and DHPU troubleshooting was successfully.  Look-ahead plan for EUTEF science program week from 3/5 to 3/11: DOSTEL Mode 1 continuous, EXPOSE ON, DEBIE-2 ON, TRIBOLAB Stand-By mode, FIPEX activation of sensors, MEDET re-activation for continuous measurements, PLEGPAY experiment 2 run.

Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL Facility commissioning is on hold pending restoration  of a LAN (Local Area Network) cable connection.

GEOFLOW:   GEOFLOW start is pending FSL LAN cable troubleshooting.  “Thanks Leo for the help with the video images of FSL!”

IMMUNO (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term Stay at ISS):    In progress.

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In progress.

Integrated Immune:  In progress.

KUBIK-FM1/ KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Completed.

LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

MISSE (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

MTR-2 (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

NOA-2 (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):    Planned.

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    In progress. 

PMDIS (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    “Peggy, we have added the next download activity to be on your task list next week.  The Actiwatch will stop taking data on 3/19 if not re-initialized.  Thanks for your extra sleep logging.”

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    On 3/4, the facility lost TM/TC control for the instruments at around 8:30am EST.  Following power cycling of Feeder 1, control of the instruments’ TM and TC was restored.  On 3/5, during the transition to Pointing Mode, the SOLAR platform unexpectedly went into standby mode.  Control of the platform was later restored, but SOVIM science acquisition activation was postponed.  On 3/6, a second attempt to bring SOLAR platform back into pointing mode was also unsuccessful.  Further troubleshooting is in work.

SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In progress. 

Swab (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   In progress.

TRAC (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

ULTRASOUND:   In progress.

WAICO #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels):    After the start of the WAICO run on 2/28, all ECs (Experiment Containers) have been centrifuged at 1-g for 3 days to force the orientation of the plants to a preferential growth direction. On 3/2 after WAICO run start, all 8 ECs were tilted to their 45° position, and Rotor A was stopped to provide 0-g conditions for 4 EC’s.  Daily video dump is performed to assess the development pattern of the plant roots.  Plant growth is nominal. The ECs show significant condensation.  To achieve clearance of the EC windows by the end of the run, in order to allow for good high-resolution photos, relative humidity was decreased to 60% on 3/4 and daily BLB (BIOLAB) LSS Flushing is being performed.  The end of the run is currently estimated for 3/10-11 based on plant growth.  Since the BLB caution due to excessive O2 concentration at the start of WAICO run, gas composition and pressure controls are not available, but there is no immediate science impact.  O2 sensors were switched back on 3/3 and show nominal values.

CEO (Crew Earth Observation):  Through 3/6 the ground has received a total of 15,902 frames of ISS/CEO imagery for review and cataloging.  “A cursory scan of imagery received this morning indicates you have acquired imagery of some of our impact sites in both North America and Africa, promising imagery of Khartoum, Sudan, and dramatic views of what appears to be Tropical Cyclone Jockwe near Mozambique.  There are probably more that we could not immediately recognize. Thanks for responding to our requests; we will provide more feedback on your imagery next week.  Your recent striking image of a gigantic cumulonimbus cloud (possibly a super cell) over western equatorial Africa will be published in NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory website this weekend. Your high oblique view with the long lens makes an excellent visual of the 3-dimensional aspect of weather systems and their structure in our atmosphere. Nice job!”

CEO photo targets uplinked for today were Hyderabad, India (the frequently turbid atmosphere over India often makes it difficult to spot city targets.  ISS had a nadir pass near midday as it approached from the NW.  Using the long lens settings to map the urban edges of this sprawling city of nearly 7 million people), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (as ISS approached this target from the NW at midday, the crew was to look for the Ethiopian capital city to be just left of track.  Using the long lens settings for a detailed mapping of urban edges, especially near the forest and agricultural areas), and Tropical Cyclone Jokwe (DYNAMIC EVENT:  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast track has Jokwe making a glancing landfall on the northeastern coast of Mozambique in the early afternoon as a Category 2 storm.  This course placed the storm just left of ISS track.  As the station approached the system from the NW, the crew was to try for broad, short lens views of the extent of the storm, and when near nadir, try for long lens views of details of the cloud structure.  Prompt downlink of DYNAMIC EVENT imagery increases its value to the media and disaster responders).

CEO photography can be studied at this “Gateway” website:
http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov  (as of 3/1/08, this database contained 757,605 views of the Earth from space, with 314,000 from the ISS alone).

------------------------------------------------

In a nutshell: the problems with EuTEF have been overcome and now it's in nominal start-up operations, FSL is waiting for network connectivity issues to be solved, and thus GEOFLOW is too; SOLAR is still giving problems with Sun-pointing and telemetry, and WAICO is proceeding well and its samples are getting ready to come back down to Earth. The rest of the experiments are proceeding nominally.

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #14 on: 03/11/2008 06:22 AM »
Article about the "Microbial Drug Resistance Virulence" experiment to be carried out during STS-123, a direct follow-on of a similar experiment whose results were published at the end of last year, showing that Salmonella has greater virulence after being in space, as other types of bacteria before:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-03/asu-mt031008.php

"In the new experimental wrinkle, the team will test a hypothesis that may lead to decreasing or preventing the risk for infectious diseases to astronauts. The experiment will determine if the modulation of different ion (mineral) concentrations may be used as a novel way to counteract or block the spaceflight-associated increase in the disease-causing potential that was seen in Salmonella. "
-DaviD-

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #15 on: 03/11/2008 04:19 PM »
Another update: the experiments in Columbus are starting to come into action. Now it's the turn of a EuTEF payload, the EVC (Earth Viewing Camera) experiment to monitor Earth and be used with educational purposes.

http://www.physorg.com/news124457453.html
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #16 on: 03/14/2008 01:30 PM »
While other regular experiments in both the RS (Granada Crystallization, Lada greenhouse pea plants...) and the USOS keep going on, though adapted and with less time allocated due to all the movement with STS-123, Columbus is having a tough time. Per yesterday's status report:

"Columbus Update:   BLBGB (BIOLAB Glovebox) remains inoperable; one of its two rotors is jammed, rendering four ECs (Experiment Containers) on the other centrifuge inaccessible.  The remaining four ECs (of 8 total) are recovered and secured in the TCU (Thermal Control Unit) for return.  FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory) is not working, pending restoration with a new bus connector.  SOLAR is working but degraded due to a technical problem.  EuTEF: six of 9 experiments are running; three are in troubleshooting process."

WAICO samples have been successfully extracted (though I read the other day, I don't remember where, that they were far younger than expected when the experiment was concieved...), the centrifuge got stuck after that.
-DaviD-

Offline catfry

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #17 on: 03/14/2008 02:25 PM »
Yeah, it seems like there has been quite a number of constant niggling problems and failures in Columbus during this activation and commisioning period. Good thing it is a manned environment where whatevers wrong can be investigated an rectified!

Offline Lawntonlookirs

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #18 on: 03/14/2008 04:42 PM »
Quote
51D Mascot - 1/3/2008  9:50 AM

This is a great idea for a thread. I do want to offer a couple of reminders to folks, though, to try to maintain perspective, because I have heard all too many folks say things like "the space station has been up for seven years and we haven't seen much in the way of science."

Sort of like living in a partly-finished house with no kitchen yet, and complaining that all you get is a bar-b-que and occasional picnics.

The space station's full laboratory and scientific capabilities are still not THERE. The US lab is only partially filled with the level of research facilities it is capable of supporting, the Columbus lab just arrived, and is still getting checked out with only very preliminary experimentation available, and the Kibo won't get there until next month. Equally significant is the fact that there will not be a six-person crew until around this time next year, and over the past seven years the primary allocation of crew time has been for assembly and maintenance duties, with relatively little time for research in very limited research facilities. The station won't be fully assembled and "complete" for two more years, so judgments about its scientific utility should be kept in perspective.

The other thing to remember is that NASA's research plans and use for the ISS are rather narrow in the VSE context, and focused on long-duration human spaceflight issues, apart from the 15% of their research that Congress requires them to conduct in "non-exploration" fields of science. But the capabilities of even the US Segment of ISS far exceed the need NASA now has, so the Congress has established a National Laboratory mechanism to enable that "surplus" capability to be used by non-NASA entities.  NASA has already signed on Memorandum of Understanding with the National Institutes of Health regarding uses of the National Laboratory and  similar MOUs are under negotiation with other US governmental agencies such as USDA, NSF, Department of Energy, NIST, etc., as well as a number of private sector research organizations. All that is targeted on utilization of station for research in the post-2010 period.

In the meantime, research activity will be limited and somewhat narrow in scope, though there are already some pretty impressive and interesting scientific results generated so far, as this thread and links will hopefully illustrate.  Just wanted to throw this in to help keep this kind of discussion in perspective.

Just a repeat of what has bee said earlier.  With all of the activity going on completing the ISS, and arival of the shuttle and upcoming arival of the ATV, I don't know how they have time to unload all of the cargo and still keep up with the other activities. :o
Everyman is my superior in that I may learn from him.  Albert Einstein

Offline eeergo

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RE: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #19 on: 03/16/2008 10:22 PM »

Interesting update in today's status report concerning one not-too-talked-about JAXA experiment with photonic crystals, returning aboard the Shuttle:

"In the Service Module (SM), FE-1 Malenchenko deinstalled the JAXA-3DPC (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency-3D Photon Crystals) crystal growth experiment and transferred it to the Shuttle for return to Earth.    [The experiment had been running since 1/22 and was turned off by Yuri on 1/31.  Its purpose was to grow photonic crystals in microgravity using particles in electrolytic solutions that will be fixed using ultraviolet light in a process referred to as photocuring, after self-organization and ordering of colloid nanoparticles in an electrolyte solution with subsequent fixation in an elastic gel matrix.]"

And another weekly science update:

----------------------------------------

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Sixteen -- Week 21)          

ALTCRISS (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS):    Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module. Radiation measurements continue to be performed in the PIRS module.  Next memory card exchange took place at 3/14.

ANITA:   Completed.

BCAT-3 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3):   Reserve.

CARDIOCOG-2:   Completed.

CCISS (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS):    Reserve.

CFE (Capillary Flow Experiment):    Reserve.

CSI-2/CGBA (CGBA Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus):    In progress.

CGBA-2 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2):  Complete.

CSLM-2 (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2):   In progress.

EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students):    Complete.

ELITE-S2 (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2):    Data collected during the first in-flight session have been down-linked and are under analysis.  Engineering assessment provided good results: the system was calibrated within the expected 1 mm accuracy.  Scientific analysis is going on.  Data collected during second in-flight session are still to be downlinked. The scientific protocols were fully executed in both sessions

EPO (Educational Payload Operations):    Reserve.

ETD (Eye Tracking Device):   In progress.

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):   DEBIE-2 showed regular link errors and was switched off on 3/9.  DOSTEL: On-going science acquisition.  EuTEMP: Currently inactive as planned.  EVC: first EVC pictures were received on 3/6.  Further commissioning was performed on 3/14 with a first successful picture acquisition run.  During a second sequence with different parameters, however, again no HRD (high rate data) could be received.  Under further investigation.  EXPOSE: On-going science acquisition.  FIPEX: Sensor units RAM3, RAM4 and ZENITH8 were switched on.  However, FIPEX showed link errors and was switched off again.  MEDET: Successful MEDET commanding from User Home Base on 3/10.  On-going science acquisition.  PLEGPAY: Further commissioning to be planned.  TRIBOLAB: In Stand-by mode.

Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL):  The FSL Facility commissioning is on hold pending restoration  of a LAN (Local Area Network) cable connection.

GEOFLOW:   Troubleshooting on FSL LAN cable repair was successfully performed.  However, damage on the MIL-STANDARD bus connector was observed (two pins are missing).  Start of GEOFLOW is pending further FSL troubleshooting.  FSL FCE (Facility Core Element) locking was performed for 1J/A docking.

IMMUNO (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term Stay at ISS):    In progress.

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2):    In progress.

Integrated Immune:  In progress.

KUBIK-FM1/ KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators:    Completed.

LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):   Complete.

MISSE (Materials ISS Experiment):  Ongoing.

MTR-2 (Russian radiation measurements):   Passive dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

MULTIGEN-1:    Completed.

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox):    Complete.

NOA-2 (Nitric Oxide Analyzer):    Planned.

NUTRITION/REPOSITORY:    “Leo, thanks for your attention to detail in completing the FD30 Nutr/Rep session! The barcode information conveyed via crew notes was very helpful.”

PMDIS (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space):    Complete.

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems):   Ongoing.

SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight):    “Peggy, thanks for completing your Actiwatch download.  We have downlinked your data and sent it to the PI.  We have placed on your task list your last scheduled sleep logging session for next week.  Thanks for the extra sleep logging.”

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory):    Anomaly on platform pointing mode under further investigation.  No science acquisition possible so far.

SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite):    In progress. 

Swab (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft):   Thank you, Peggy, for completing the additional SWAB session off the Voluntary Science list.  The extra data collected will assist the PI in a comparison between the previous samples in the USL and those you recently collected from the new modules that they would not have originally been able to obtain. “

TRAC (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities):   Planned.

ULTRASOUND:   In progress.

WAICO #1 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels):    Further attempts made to reduce condensation in ECs (Experiment Containers) by continuous flushing and by flushing only 2 EC’s at a time (to increase the flow / pressure) did not reduce the condensation significantly.  The condensation presented a major challenge on high-resolution picture quality for the crew activity on 3/10.  To recover, an additional video session was proposed during the fixation because the fixation fluid clears the EC windows.  During the ground commanding after the photo activity, two BIOLAB (BLB) anomalies occurred which lead to a loss of centrifugation and temperature control for ~4:20 versus the 2 hours that was originally foreseen.  Fixation & washing was planned during the night from 3/11 to 3/12.  Multiple BLB anomalies occurred on both rotors.  Troubleshooting did not allow to perform any fixation on 3/12 or 3/13.  Rotor B was blocked and could not provide a 1-g stimulus since 3/11.  The 4 EC’s from Rotor A (0-g condition) were transferred to BLB TCU at +4degC to slow down the growth and will be downloaded on 1J/A.  4 EC’s of Rotor B have yet to be retrieved by the crew from the blocked Rotor B.  Anomalies during WAICO-Run#1 imply major impact on science return.

CEO (Crew Earth Observation):  Ongoing.

No CEO photo targets uplinked for today.

CEO photography can be studied at this “Gateway” website:
http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov  (as of 3/1/08, this database contained 757,605 views of the Earth from space, with 314,000 from the ISS alone).

-------------------------------------------

No joy with Columbus' experiments :( WAICO's going to get really affected science (not very useful presumably, although you never know...) and SOLAR is still inoperable. EuTEF is also having glitches on some of its experiments, and FSL is waiting for the LAN cable routing.

-DaviD-

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