Author Topic: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA  (Read 2018 times)

Offline catdlr

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Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« on: 07/19/2017 01:24 AM »
Space Shuttle First Flights: STS-1, STS-2, STS-3, STS-4:


Jeff Quitney
Published on Jul 17, 2017

"THE ORBITAL FLIGHT TESTS OF THE SPACE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
 
The first four test missions of the Space Transportation System (STS) - flights STS-1, 2, 3, and 4 - are covered. Also included are the events leading up to the launch of STS-1, President Reagan's speech after the landing of STS-4, and highlights of the Orbital Flight Test Program in general."

NASA film JSC-824

Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound.



STS-3 was NASA's third Space Shuttle mission and was the third mission for the Space Shuttle Columbia. It was the first shuttle launch with an unpainted external tank, and the only mission to land at the White Sands Space Harbor near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

Columbia was launched from Kennedy Space Center at 11:00 am EST, on 22 March 1982, the planned launch date.[1] The launch was delayed by one hour due to the failure of a heater on a nitrogen-gas ground support line. Prior to the launch, Columbia had spent only 70 days in the Orbiter Processing Facility—a record checkout time. The two-man crew consisted of Jack R. Lousma, commander, and Charles G. Fullerton, pilot.

The primary objectives of the flight were to continue testing the "Canadarm" Remote Manipulator System (RMS) and to carry out extensive thermal testing of Columbia by exposing its tail, nose, and top to the Sun for varying periods of time. The crew found that prolonged exposure to the Sun caused the cargo bay doors to warp slightly and not close. Rolling the orbiter to balance temperatures around the orbiter resolved the issue...

STS-3 was planned as a 7-day flight. The landing was moved to Northrop Strip (later renamed White Sands Space Harbor) at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. since the planned landing site at Edwards Air Force Base had flooded due to excessive rain...

Touchdown finally took place at 9:05 am MST, 30 March 1982, at Northrop Strip... The landing demonstrated that the shuttle could land in the desert, but sand damaged the orbiter...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-4

STS-4 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, using the Space Shuttle Columbia. The mission launched on 27 June 1982 and landed a week later on 4 July. STS-4 was the fourth shuttle mission overall and was also the fourth mission for the Columbia.

Backup crew

From STS-4 onwards, NASA halted the appointment and training of complete backup flight crews. Instead, individual flight crew members were assigned backups who could take their place within the prime crew. The decision on whether to appoint a reserve crew member was made on a per-flight basis by flight management teams at Johnson Space Center. Consequently, the last NASA flight to have a full-time backup crew was STS-3...

STS-4 launched from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on 27 June 1982 at 11:00 am EST, with Ken Mattingly as commander, and Henry Hartsfield as the pilot. This mission marked the first time the Space Shuttle launched precisely at its scheduled launch time. It was also the last research and development flight in the program, after which NASA considered the shuttle operational.

STS-4's cargo consisted of the first Getaway Special payloads, including nine scientific experiments provided by students from Utah State University, and a classified US Air Force payload of two missile launch-detection systems...

In the shuttle's mid-deck, a Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System and the Monodisperse Latex Reactor flew for the second time. The crew conducted a lightning survey with hand-held cameras and performed medical experiments...

Columbia landed on 4 July 1982 at 9:09 am PDT, on the 15,000 feet (4,600 m) concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, the first Shuttle landing on a concrete runway. President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy greeted the crew upon arrival.

The flight lasted 7 days, 1 hour, 9 minutes and 31 seconds, and covered a total distance of 4,700,000 kilometers (2,900,000 mi) in 112 complete orbits. The mission achieved all objectives except for the Air Force payload, but two SRBs were lost when their main parachutes failed, causing the empty casings to impact the ocean at high velocity and sink. Columbia returned to KSC on 15 July...

Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hk8f0uH8EIQ?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Hog

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Re: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« Reply #1 on: 07/22/2017 04:44 PM »
Excellent video. It appeared as though I was going to get a straight shot at the Body Flap of Columbia during SRB ignition during STS-1, but it was blocked by "smoke".  The views given for SRB ignition for STS-2,3,4 clearly show the body flap.
I have yet to see a SRB ignition video showing the 1-1/2' displacement of the body flap during STS-1 SRB ignition. To remedy the damage/potential body flap damage, improved acoustical energy management was used.  I am under the impression that this may be where the "water bags" on the MLP were used?

1st body flap shot for STS-1 is at 3:50.
At 7:41 there is a far away shot that cuts away JUST the body flap during SRB ignition of STS-1.
At 7:53 we are shown the SSME startup sequence coupled with SRB ignition, and it is assumed that it is STS-1, but if that's the body flap that I am seeing on the right side of the picture, it doesn't appear to move.

The STS-4 footage at 8:20 clearly shows body flap deflection upon SRB sep

In the video there is also a few snippets of what appears to be an OMS engine firing during a period where it normally would NOT.  Looks like one engine is being "pulsed"  leaving a "dash-dash-dash" appearance in the air.


« Last Edit: 07/22/2017 04:57 PM by Hog »
Paul

Online DaveS

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Re: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« Reply #2 on: 07/22/2017 05:04 PM »
Excellent video. It appeared as though I was going to get a straight shot at the Body Flap of Columbia during SRB ignition during STS-1, but it was blocked by "smoke".  The views given for SRB ignition for STS-2,3,4 clearly show the body flap.
I have yet to see a SRB ignition video showing the 1-1/2' displacement of the body flap during STS-1 SRB ignition. To remedy the damage/potential body flap damage, improved acoustical energy management was used.  I am under the impression that this may be where the "water bags" on the MLP were used?
That and the large pipes around the SRB exhaust holes on the MLP. These were known as the Ignition Overpressure (IOP) suppression system. The smoke trails are from the yaw jets. The yaw jets aren't shut down until until below Mach 1.
« Last Edit: 07/22/2017 05:05 PM by DaveS »
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Hog

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Re: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« Reply #3 on: 07/24/2017 09:59 AM »
Excellent video. It appeared as though I was going to get a straight shot at the Body Flap of Columbia during SRB ignition during STS-1, but it was blocked by "smoke".  The views given for SRB ignition for STS-2,3,4 clearly show the body flap.
I have yet to see a SRB ignition video showing the 1-1/2' displacement of the body flap during STS-1 SRB ignition. To remedy the damage/potential body flap damage, improved acoustical energy management was used.  I am under the impression that this may be where the "water bags" on the MLP were used?
That and the large pipes around the SRB exhaust holes on the MLP. These were known as the Ignition Overpressure (IOP) suppression system. The smoke trails are from the yaw jets. The yaw jets aren't shut down until until below Mach 1.
Thanks Dave, I thought RCS was done way before subsonic.

Paul

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Re: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« Reply #4 on: 07/24/2017 10:13 AM »
From what I've read, the rcs is phased out during descent in the order that the aerodynamic control become effective. Pitch and roll become effective through the flaperons and body flap at some mach, but until the aoa comes down to near 0 the rudder is blanketed and ineffective. So the yaw rcs is used until below mach 1.

Online DaveS

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Re: Opening New Frontiers" 1982 NASA
« Reply #5 on: 07/24/2017 10:17 AM »
From what I've read, the rcs is phased out during descent in the order that the aerodynamic control become effective. Pitch and roll become effective through the flaperons and body flap at some mach, but until the aoa comes down to near 0 the rudder is blanketed and ineffective. So the yaw rcs is used until below mach 1.
They're not flapperons, but rather elevons (combined elevators and ailerons).
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

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