Author Topic: Installing a centrifuge brought up in parts in existing ISS modules?  (Read 1832 times)

Offline clb22

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Looking at the original specs of the centrifuge, I wonder whether it is possible to bring a centrifuge up in parts and have it assembled somewhere within the ISS.

These are the CAM Centrifuge Rotor (CR) specs:

Quote
The CR is the largest (2.5m diameter) equipment for gravitational experiments. It provides a selectable, simulated gravity environment from 0.01g up to 2.00g (0.01g increments) for biological specimens on ISS. Small animals and plants could also be used in experiments with the CR, and significant advances for those gravitational experiments are expected.
   
Location   CAM
Mass   Less than 1875kg
Dimension   Rotating radius 1.25m
Operational Period   10 years on orbit
Habitat   
Max. mass:   87kg
Dimensions:   W19XH24.4XD24(inch) W48XH62XD61(cm)
Max number:   8
Mission Overview   CR provides Biological specimens with a simulated Gravitational environment by rotating habitats.
Rotor Functionality   
Artificial Gravity:   0.01-2.00g(0.01g increments)
Spin-up Acceleration:   5min.-1hour

I do not think it would be a problem to bring up a similar centrifuge rotor in parts and assemble it on orbit by the crew. However, where could it be located + what about the vibration environment, power requirements etc.? The only viable location I can think of is the back-side of the PMM.
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Online Svetoslav

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We already have several centrifuges on board - we have one in Columbus, one in Kibo, one in the Russian segment.

Offline clb22

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We already have several centrifuges on board - we have one in Columbus, one in Kibo, one in the Russian segment.

Those are not for extended variable gravity research as far as I know.
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Offline Jim

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Not viable. 
The ground installation involved removing the module end cap.  The rotor was attached to the endcone.  There isn't way of attaching the rotor support which would require welding.

Balancing would be an issue.
The current modules have stand offs and many interferences

Offline neilh

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We already have several centrifuges on board - we have one in Columbus, one in Kibo, one in the Russian segment.

How large are these centrifuges?
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Offline eeergo

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We already have several centrifuges on board - we have one in Columbus, one in Kibo, one in the Russian segment.

Those are not for extended variable gravity research as far as I know.

Yes, they are. Europe's are certified for 0-2Gs, and Japan's too. Not sure about there being a centrifuge in the RS, just the LADA greenhouse.
« Last Edit: 02/06/2010 07:13 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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We already have several centrifuges on board - we have one in Columbus, one in Kibo, one in the Russian segment.

How large are these centrifuges?

Not as big as CAM's, but adequate for plant growth:
Columbus' EMCS: http://www.spaceflight.esa.int/users/downloads/factsheets/fs045_10_emcs.pdf
JAXA's CBEF is similar in size.
-DaviD-

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