Author Topic: Shenzhou-ISS cooperation flight possible with new NASA direction?  (Read 6536 times)

Offline mmeijeri

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Hey, I like the Shuttle too! Not quite carnally, but still...
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Offline Danderman

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My two cents:

I would imagine that after the world changes, and Congress allows Chinese participation in ISS, the Chinese would want a module at ISS. So, where would it go?

Offline mmeijeri

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Since the Chinese are planning to build their own station, would it be reasonable to assume their module would have propulsion? If so, could such a module be used to augment / replace the current Russian propulsion module?
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Offline Danderman

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Since the Chinese are planning to build their own station, would it be reasonable to assume their module would have propulsion? If so, could such a module be used to augment / replace the current Russian propulsion module?

It would tough to replace the ISS Service Module, for reasons that have nothing to do with propulsion.

Offline wannamoonbase

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The ISS is getting more interesting by the week....

I'd hope so it can't get less interesting than it is currently.

China is a long way from being invited to the ISS.  Very low flight rate and they haven't proven they can dock on orbit yet.

Also, politically China has many short comings.  Human rights being the easiest of all items to relate.  Then there is currency manipulation and non stop theft of intellectual property.

Dispite all the hype on China they have many short comings and are not as powerful as suggested.  They may be there in 10 or 20 years.
Excited to be finally into the first Falcon Heavy flow, we are getting so close!

Online Phillip Clark

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Maybe with the shuttle being retired, there might be the option of NASA asking the Chinese to allow the flight of an astronaut aboard a Shenzhou to ISS?

After all, a few years ago NASA's total reliance on the Russians for ISS access would have been unthinkable.

It depends on how successful the proposed commercial US piloted spacecraft turn out to be.
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Offline Danderman

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Maybe with the shuttle being retired, there might be the option of NASA asking the Chinese to allow the flight of an astronaut aboard a Shenzhou to ISS?

After all, a few years ago NASA's total reliance on the Russians for ISS access would have been unthinkable.

It depends on how successful the proposed commercial US piloted spacecraft turn out to be.

This has been in the air since 2004. However, the problem is that the low flight rate means that the Chinese may not be able to schedule such a mission until the middle of the decade.

Offline Jim

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Come on now.  Without the shuttle there's no practical way of retrofitting solar panels. 

This reliance on EELVs for every need in space is silly.  Even if you were able to cram a solar panel unit onto an EELV then what?  How does the payload get to the ISS?  How does it maneuver into position?  What happens with the old panels?

EELVs are not a panacea and there's much more involved than payload volume and lift capability.

Incorrect.  And yes, they are a panacea.
All is needed is a small propulsion module.  The Mir paradigm would be followed.  Since no replacement hardware exists, while it is being redesigned, the propulsion module can be added.

Offline Jorge

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Maybe with the shuttle being retired, there might be the option of NASA asking the Chinese to allow the flight of an astronaut aboard a Shenzhou to ISS?

After all, a few years ago NASA's total reliance on the Russians for ISS access would have been unthinkable.

It was unthinkable because it was (and is) a bad thing.

I do not understand why we would want more of a bad thing.
JRF

Offline mmeijeri

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It was unthinkable because it was (and is) a bad thing.

What is a bad thing, mere use of foreign crew vehicles or reliance on them?
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Offline Jorge

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It was unthinkable because it was (and is) a bad thing.

What is a bad thing, mere use of foreign crew vehicles or reliance on them?

The latter.
JRF

Online Robotbeat

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It was unthinkable because it was (and is) a bad thing.

What is a bad thing, mere use of foreign crew vehicles or reliance on them?

The latter.

Totally agreed. Russia will use any lever they can for their own geopolitical gain (much like the US, except Russia has fewer levers and is generally better at pulling the levers they do have). I like cooperation with Russia, but reliance on them is not wise. I assure you, the feeling is mutual (hence all the talk from the Russians about separating their section of ISS if the US was going to splash the ISS). Russia wouldn't be caught in a situation where they had to rely on us, either.

EDIT: Same goes for China, whenever they start regularly going to LEO. (Although we are much more intertwined with China than Russia.)
« Last Edit: 02/08/2010 08:51 PM by Robotbeat »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

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