Author Topic: SPACE SHUTTLE ENTERPRISE APPROACH AND LANDING TESTS NASA DRYDEN 1977  (Read 1619 times)

Offline catdlr

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PeriscopeFilm
Published on Sep 21, 2017

This Rockwell International film shows some of the events of 1977 when, as part of approach and landing tests at Edwards Air Force Base, the Space Shuttle Enterprise made captive flights and then flew on its own for the first time. The title of the film A SPACESHIP LANDED ON EARTH became part of a larger advertising campaign for Rockwell affiliated with the test program.

Free-flights that are shown in the represented the end of the flight testing program. These saw Enterprise mated to the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft and carried to a launch altitude, before being jettisoned by the use of explosive bolts to glide to a landing on the runways at Edwards AFB. The intention of these flights was to test the flight characteristics of the orbiter itself, on a typical approach and landing profile from orbit.

There were a total of five free-flights between August and October. As shown in this film, the first three saw Enterprise remain fitted with its aerodynamic tail cone, intended to reduce drag and buffetting when mounted on the SCA during flight. The final two had the tail cone removed, with the orbiter in its full operational configuration, with dummy main engines and OMS pods. Enterprise used an air data probe mounted on its nose for these flights. These five flights were to be the only time Enterprise flew alone.

After flying missions on Columbia (STS-2) and Discovery (STS-51-I), Engle reported that the flight and handling characteristics of the operational orbiters were similar to those of Enterprise, except that he had to fly a steeper profile with the prototype, as it was much lighter than the operational spacecraft.

Space Shuttle Enterprise (Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-101) was the first orbiter of the Space Shuttle system. Rolled out on September 17, 1976, it was built for NASA as part of the Space Shuttle program to perform atmospheric test flights after being launched from a modified Boeing 747. It was constructed without engines or a functional heat shield, and was therefore not capable of spaceflight.

Enterprise was restored and placed on display in 2003 at the Smithsonian's new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Following the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet, Discovery replaced Enterprise at the Udvar-Hazy Center, and Enterprise was transferred to the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York City, where it has been on display since July 2012.

We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment!  See something interesting?  Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7iyEy--Huk?t=001

« Last Edit: 09/22/2017 02:43 AM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline MATTBLAK

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I LOVE the Periscope films stuff. But I admit there are times when I find the constantly visible timecodes annoying.
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Offline catdlr

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SPACE SHUTTLE ENTERPRISE APPROACH AND LANDING TESTS at NASA DRYDEN 59104

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ey6YwJSo8Y0?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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and another....

SPACE SHUTTLE ENTERPRISE LANDING TESTS & SHUTTLE PROGRAM OVERVIEW 59094

PeriscopeFilm
Published on Oct 17, 2017


This short 1979 film, Space Shuttle: America’s Space Transportation System, is produced by Rockwell International’s Space Division and promotes the future of the U.S. space transportation system using space shuttles. The film primarily uses still images, but it opens with actual footage of the space shuttle orbiter Enterprise making its landing in October 1977 (00:10). The film discusses how the space shuttles are reusable cargo carriers, which launch from either the Kennedy Space Center (00:52) or Vandenberg Air Force Base. The film gives an overview of launch, rocket detachment, and moving into orbit. Once in orbit, the cargo bay doors open and the shuttle can remove a satellite and set it into Earth’s orbit. Shuttle orbiters can also fix or recover satellites, providing major cost savings. The film concludes with an overview of how the shuttles re-enter Earth’s atmosphere, operating like a plane as they touch down on 15,000-foot runways. The quick turnaround on getting shuttles back into space allows NASA to make 60 shuttle flights each year with only 5 shuttles, another cost-effective feature of the program and the shuttles.
 
The Space Shuttle program was the United States government's manned launch vehicle program, administered by NASA from 1972 to 2011 and first flown in 1981. Its official name, Space Transportation System (STS), was taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.
The Space Shuttle—composed of an orbiter launched with two reusable solid rocket boosters and a disposable external fuel tank—carried up to eight astronauts and up to 50,000 lb (23,000 kg) of payload into low Earth orbit (LEO). When its mission was complete, the orbiter would re-enter the Earth's atmosphere and lands like a glider at either the Kennedy Space Center or Edwards Air Force Base.
The first experimental orbiter Enterprise was a high-altitude glider, launched from the back of a specially modified Boeing 747, only for initial atmospheric landing tests (ALT). Enterprise's first test flight was on February 18, 1977, only five years after the Shuttle program was formally initiated; leading to the launch of the first space-worthy shuttle Columbia on April 12, 1981, on STS-1. The Space Shuttle program finished with its last mission, STS-135 flown by Atlantis, in July 2011, retiring the final Shuttle in the fleet. The Space Shuttle program formally ended on August 31, 2011.

The first orbiter was originally planned to be named Constitution, but a massive write-in campaign from fans of the Star Trek television series convinced the White House to change the name to Enterprise. Amid great fanfare, Enterprise (designated OV-101) was rolled out on September 17, 1976, and later conducted a successful series of glide-approach and landing tests in 1977 that were the first real validation of the design.

We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment!  See something interesting?  Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VLEA34Sh2g?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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