Author Topic: General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics  (Read 19549 times)

Offline CameronD

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Re: General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics
« Reply #80 on: 11/08/2017 09:07 PM »
I don't know enough to say how much of that is actually usable due wall effects on the flow. The model in the photos looked pretty small for something that's fitting in an 8.2 foot wide tube, so presumably they want it to see a very smooth gas front undistorted by the tube it's flowing in. Keep in  mind M9 with M1 at 340m/s is less than 0.4 ms to pass a 1m long object so 100ms is > 250x longer than it should take to establish smooth flow, collect data and have the flow subside ]

Accurately instrumenting something much faster than 1ms (required response times in microseconds), whilst not impossible, isn't particularly trivial (ie. cheap) and brings a host of other issues/errors into play, like scan rate and the speed of signals in wires.  Perhaps they're also working at the limits of their instrumentation.
   
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Online john smith 19

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Re: General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics
« Reply #81 on: 11/08/2017 09:25 PM »
I don't know enough to say how much of that is actually usable due wall effects on the flow. The model in the photos looked pretty small for something that's fitting in an 8.2 foot wide tube, so presumably they want it to see a very smooth gas front undistorted by the tube it's flowing in. Keep in  mind M9 with M1 at 340m/s is less than 0.4 ms to pass a 1m long object so 100ms is > 250x longer than it should take to establish smooth flow, collect data and have the flow subside ]

Accurately instrumenting something much faster than 1ms (required response times in microseconds), whilst not impossible, isn't particularly trivial (ie. cheap) and brings a host of other issues/errors into play, like scan rate and the speed of signals in wires.  Perhaps they're also working at the limits of their instrumentation.
 
Depends on the sensors and their response times.

Consider that a "small disturbance high frequency response pressure sensor" is also called a microphone and such devices were "listening" to the sound of "reentry noise" up to 200 KHz on a reentry vehicle (in a wind tunnel, not actual flight) in the 70's.

Pressure sensitive paint and IR cameras have also raised the number of data points you can collect, along with high temperature IE Sapphire optical fibers.

I'd say the hardware is available but the challenge is scale effects. Mfg all the little holes on the surface so they don't corrupt the signal (painstaking and precise work), hence the attraction of "area" sensors that can read the whole surface.   
« Last Edit: 11/09/2017 10:42 PM by john smith 19 »
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Offline Star One

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General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics
« Reply #82 on: 11/12/2017 08:06 PM »
Navy's Ultimate Weapon: Sub-launched Hypersonic Missiles

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Benedict refused to provide any other details of the test, but a Pentagon spokesperson later gave additional information when contacted by U.S. Naval Institute News. “The Navy Strategic Systems Program (SSP), on behalf of the Department of Defense, conducted an Intermediate Range Conventional Prompt Strike Flight Experiment-1 (CPS FE-1) test on Oct. 30, 2017, from Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii,” said Cmdr. Patrick Evans, the Pentagon spokesperson. “The test collected data on hypersonic boost-glide technologies and test-range performance for long-range atmospheric flight. This data will be used by the Department of Defense to anchor ground testing, modeling, and simulation of hypersonic flight vehicle performance and is applicable to a range of possible Conventional Prompt Strike (CPS) concepts.”

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DOD has promised the Pacific and European combatant commands that certain hypersonic capabilities will be fielded within the timeframe of fiscal year 2018–22. If the Navy’s sea-based hypersonic missile capabilities are realized, they are likely to be deployed on the four Ohio-class guided-missile submarines, as well as the new Virginia-class attack submarines.

https://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2017/11/12/navys_ultimate_weapon_sub-launched_hypersonic_missiles_112621.html

Wonder if the British navy will be seeking a similar capability for our submarines.
« Last Edit: 11/12/2017 08:11 PM by Star One »

Online john smith 19

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Re: General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics
« Reply #83 on: 11/12/2017 10:23 PM »
Navy's Ultimate Weapon: Sub-launched Hypersonic Missiles

Quote
Benedict refused to provide any other details of the test, but a Pentagon spokesperson later gave additional information when contacted by U.S. Naval Institute News. “The Navy Strategic Systems Program (SSP), on behalf of the Department of Defense, conducted an Intermediate Range Conventional Prompt Strike Flight Experiment-1 (CPS FE-1) test on Oct. 30, 2017, from Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii,” said Cmdr. Patrick Evans, the Pentagon spokesperson. “The test collected data on hypersonic boost-glide technologies and test-range performance for long-range atmospheric flight. This data will be used by the Department of Defense to anchor ground testing, modeling, and simulation of hypersonic flight vehicle performance and is applicable to a range of possible Conventional Prompt Strike (CPS) concepts.”

Quote
DOD has promised the Pacific and European combatant commands that certain hypersonic capabilities will be fielded within the timeframe of fiscal year 2018–22. If the Navy’s sea-based hypersonic missile capabilities are realized, they are likely to be deployed on the four Ohio-class guided-missile submarines, as well as the new Virginia-class attack submarines.

https://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2017/11/12/navys_ultimate_weapon_sub-launched_hypersonic_missiles_112621.html

Wonder if the British navy will be seeking a similar capability for our submarines.
Note this is a test mission to get baseline data to design a (possible) future weapon system, which may get funded.

It's a long way from anything getting deployed in front line service.

As for the British Navy I think they will be sticking with "run silent, run deep."
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.

Offline Star One

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Re: General Hypersonic Flight Related Topics
« Reply #84 on: 11/14/2017 04:22 PM »
Lawmakers set 2022 target for DOD to field 'early operational' hypersonic strike capability

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Congress will soon vote on a defense policy bill that requires the U.S. military to plan for an "early operational" variant of a hypersonic strike weapon by 2022, setting a new statutory expectation for the Conventional Prompt Strike technology development effort.

The conference version of the House and Senate Armed Services committees' fiscal year 2018 defense authorization bill adopts the position advanced by the House requiring the defense secretary and Joint Chiefs chairman to "plan to reach an early operational capability for the conventional prompt strike weapon system by not later than September 30, 2022."

The Pentagon does not have a formal acquisition program of record for a hypersonic strike capability. The Defense Department is exploring potential boost-glide hypersonic technologies as part of a research and development effort overseen by the office of the secretary of defense, a project that has spent nearly $1 billion to date, with plans to allocate another $1.2 billion over the next five years.

In accordance with congressional guidance in the FY-16 National Defense Authorization Act, DOD plans a materiel development decision for a Conventional Prompt Strike capability in FY-20, the initial gateway to a formal acquisition effort.

The final FY-18 defense policy bill scrapped a House-proposed provisions to fence half the funding for the Conventional Prompt Strike program in the current fiscal year until the Pentagon provides lawmakers a report on the program, opting instead to set a 180-day deadline for the delivery of the report after the bill is enacted.

The report, which is to be prepared by the Joint Chiefs chairman in consultation with the heads of U.S. European, Pacific and Strategic commands, is to outline "the required level of resources that is consistent with the level of priority associated to the capability gap."

The required Pentagon appraisal is also to outline "the estimated period for the delivery of a medium-range early operational capability [and] the required level of resources necessary to field a medium-range conventional prompt strike weapon within the United States (including the territories and possessions of the United States) or a similar sea-based system."

In addition, the report is to address plans to ensure interoperability among any joint military hypersonic strike capabilities as well as plans -- including policy options -- "considered appropriate to address any potential risks of ambiguity from the launch or employment of such a capability."

The Joint Requirements Oversight Council, led by Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Paul Selva, last year assured the heads of U.S. European and Pacific commands, who are watching China and Russia routinely flight test high-speed weapons, that "certain" hypersonic strike capabilities would be fielded within the FY-17 to FY-22 future years defense plan.

Then-Defense Secretary Ash Carter, in written responses to Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL) following a March 4, 2016, hearing of the House Appropriations defense subcommittee, explained DOD had promised commanders in Europe and the Pacific an initial hypersonic strike capability between FY-18 and FY-22.

Aderholt had asked whether any combatant commanders had formally identified a need for a Conventional Prompt Global Strike capability, or the means to strike targets anywhere on earth in as little as an hour.

Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, EUCOM chief, and Adm. Harry Harris, PACOM head, according to Carter, both "submitted high-priority requirements for these capabilities" as part of the routine process combatant commanders use to influence Pentagon resource decisions, in this case the shape of the FY-18 budget and the accompanying five-year spending plan.

https://insidedefense.com/daily-news/lawmakers-set-2022-target-dod-field-early-operational-hypersonic-strike-capability

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