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1
Wasn't the RocketLab flight FAA certified? Yet it still flew.
Does the FAA have jurisdiction in New Zealand?  I suspect not...
You wouldn't think so, but that's how it worked since RocketLab is, in some legal senses, a US company.

EDIT: Here it is from the FAA themselves:
https://twitter.com/faanews/status/938080864063442945
Quote
#FAA has licensed @RocketLab for a Dec. 8 Electron rocket launch. The launch will occur in #NewZealand.  #FAASpace 🚀
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Exactly.

Based on these TRLs, a decade or two of 'risk reduction' is needed before reasonably ready to 'down-select' to this design.  And since it wasn't 'invented' by NASA, it is highly likely something more familiar (higher TRL, like SLS/Orion) would be selected.

Crazy to imagine that someone will start building this vehicle within a year or two (or second quarter of this year even).
What is the point you're trying to make? It's a little vague.

TRL's can be a part of making informed decisions about what approaches to use to pursue goals. TRL of landing a high aspect ratio large object from orbit. Zero. TRL of landing high aspect ratio object with wings from orbit, nine. So quite an obvious choice really.
Nope. You don't understand TRL.
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Wasn't the RocketLab flight FAA certified? Yet it still flew.
Does the FAA have jurisdiction in New Zealand?  I suspect not...
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SpaceX General Section / Re: SpaceX - now a satellite manufacturer?
« Last post by AncientU on Today at 11:11 PM »
...

We should be explicit on whether we're talking about the LEO or vLEO constellation.

I thought the LEO constellation was significantly higher than 200-300 km...  about twice that altitude IIRC.  And yes - 5-7 years.
The vLEO constellation will fly low and last fewer years, 2-3 IIRC.

That's two IIRCs in quick succession...  If I'm wrong, please jump in...

LEO around 1100-1300km, VLEO around 340km(page 2 of attachment), thrusting continuously to avoid orbital decay (in 3-4 weeks).
5-7 year service life (page 40)for both constellation sats. -- couldn't find an alternate lifetime for VLEO sats.

Edit: Transposed figures 430-->340(correct value)
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welp, they got 2 options, either they continue WDRing ( no range needed), or they rollback and let everybody rest.
Or continue WDRing until everything looks perfect and then rollback and let some people rest and others get back to removing the RSS.
6
Exactly.

Based on these TRLs, a decade or two of 'risk reduction' is needed before reasonably ready to 'down-select' to this design.  And since it wasn't 'invented' by NASA, it is highly likely something more familiar (higher TRL, like SLS/Orion) would be selected.

Crazy to imagine that someone will start building this vehicle within a year or two (or second quarter of this year even).
What is the point you're trying to make? It's a little vague.

TRL's can be a part of making informed decisions about what approaches to use to pursue goals. TRL of landing a high aspect ratio large object from orbit. Zero. TRL of landing high aspect ratio object with wings from orbit, nine. So quite an obvious choice really.
I would describe the BFS flat surface more as a fin than a wing. Or if you prefer, an aerodynamic center movement surface.
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On a secondary note, I predict more traffic on NASASpaceflight forums by us furloughed NASA workers. 😂

BTW, our cafeteria has fun names for various items, like a "rotary wing" and "fixed wing" and "CALYPSO." We also have one named "the Furlough." 😂
8
welp, they got 2 options, either they continue WDRing ( no range needed), or they rollback and let everybody rest.
9
Exactly.

Based on these TRLs, a decade or two of 'risk reduction' is needed before reasonably ready to 'down-select' to this design.  And since it wasn't 'invented' by NASA, it is highly likely something more familiar (higher TRL, like SLS/Orion) would be selected.

Crazy to imagine that someone will start building this vehicle within a year or two (or second quarter of this year even).
What is the point you're trying to make? It's a little vague.

TRL's can be a part of making informed decisions about what approaches to use to pursue goals. TRL of landing a high aspect ratio large object from orbit. Zero. TRL of landing high aspect ratio object with wings from orbit, nine. So quite an obvious choice really.
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The range and the Cape use civil servants which will not be working.

Before anybody asks, it would apply to FAA employees too for commercial ranges.
So would this apply to airports, too? Air travel hasn't stopped, so I fail to see why space travel would necessarily have to stop even for commercial ranges.

Wasn't the RocketLab flight FAA certified? Yet it still flew.
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