Author Topic: India Planning Mission to Venus  (Read 15052 times)

Offline Star One

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #20 on: 12/26/2015 10:54 PM »
Probably like the Mars project it has been in hand behind the scenes longer than realised?

Offline Ohsin

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #21 on: 12/28/2015 11:04 AM »
So far they were saying its either Venus or an Asteroid mission. Probably it means they will zero in on the mission specifics and decide to go with Venus next year...
"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline vyoma

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #22 on: 08/10/2016 05:25 PM »
Hat tip: Antariksh at r/isro.
« Last Edit: 08/13/2016 04:18 AM by vyoma »

Online sanman

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Offline ss1_3

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #24 on: 01/05/2017 03:12 AM »
Sorry to keep BUMP'ing up this thread. ;)

Nothing new, they just mentioned in the ISC plenary session that they are still considering feasibility of a Venus mission.

http://www.financialexpress.com/lifestyle/science/after-mars-isro-eyes-venus-and-jupiter/496762/

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“We are looking at other planets that we can explore. So, two of them are Jupiter and Venus. The mission analysis is on what type of satellite we are supposed to build and what type of rocket we need.

“Studies are going on and it may take few years from now to have a concrete plan,” M Nageswara Rao, Associate Director, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said at a plenary session on science technology at the Indian Science Congress here.


Now that the proposed Venus missions DAVINCI and VERITAS have not been shortlisted for the next NASA Discovery missions, it becomes ever important that new missions be planned by other space agencies. Both China & India have the capability to take up the lead here.

Offline vyoma

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #25 on: 02/12/2017 04:41 PM »
http://zeenews.india.com/space/after-record-setting-satellite-launch-isro-aims-for-venus-and-mars-may-partner-with-nasa_1976355.html

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Finance Minister Arun Jaitley gave the department of space a 23% increase in its budget. Under the space sciences section, the budget mentions provisions “for Mars Orbiter Mission II and Mission to Venus”.

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India’s maiden mission to Venus, the second planet of the solar system, is in all probability going to be a modest orbiter mission.

Watkins said a mission to Venus is very-very worthwhile as so little is understood about that planet and NASA would definitely be willing to partner in India’s maiden voyage to Venus.

Towards that, NASA and ISRO have already initiated talks this month on trying to jointly undertake studies on using electrical propulsion for powering this mission.

Online sanman

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Offline vineethgk

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #27 on: 04/19/2017 06:35 PM »
Signs of movement in ISRO's Venus exploration programme!

Announcement of Opportunity (AO) for Space Based Experiments to Study Venus
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In this context, proposals are solicited from interested scientists within India for novel space based experiments. This Announcement of Opportunity (AO) is addressed to all institutions in India. Those sending proposals may be currently involved in planetary exploration studies / the development of science instruments for space / willing to develop the experiments.  The Principal Investigator of the proposal should (i) provide necessary details of the instrument which can address the scientific problems and (ii) be capable of bringing together the instrument team and lead the team for developing a space qualified instrument.

The payload capability of the proposed satellite is likely to be 175 kg with 500W of power. However these values are to be tuned based on the final configuration. The proposed orbit is expected to be around 500 x 60,000 km around Venus.  This orbit is likely to be reduced gradually, over several months to a lower apoapsis.

With the success of MOM under their belt, they appear to be gunning for a proper science mission itself first time round. The advertised payload of 175kg might be based on a launch with GSLV Mk2. No mention of the mission timeline though.
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 06:37 PM by vineethgk »

Offline vineethgk

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #28 on: 04/20/2017 05:17 PM »
After Mars, ISRO turns eye on Venus - Invites study ideas for new mission
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It’s official. The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has invited scientists to suggest studies for a potential orbiter mission to Venus - somewhat similar to the one that landed in Mars in 2013.
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"The Announcement of Opportunity [AO] is just the beginning. The studies must be finalised, a project report would have to be presented and approved. A formal mission may not happen before 2020," a senior ISRO official told The Hindu.

A mission must be approved by ISRO's Advisory Committee on Space Sciences, then the Space Commission and later by the government.

Online sanman

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #29 on: 04/21/2017 07:41 AM »
Personally, I think that it would be worthwhile to have an additional extra mini-probe that would detach from the main orbiter spacecraft, to descend into the atmosphere of Venus. Various forum people have commented that aerocapture should be especially doable for Venus, given its conveniently thicker atmosphere relative to its gravitation. A detachable mini-probe that descends into Venus' atmosphere would be sort of counterpart or successor to the Moon Impact Probe on the Chandrayaan-1 mission.

Indian politicians and media alike were happy to crow that India had "put its flag on the Moon", courtesy of Chandrayaan-1's MIP which had been proposed by the late President Dr Abdul Kalam. Of course that was only true in the barest possible technical sense, given that the MIP instantly disintegrated on contact with the lunar landscape, along with any flag painted on its side.

But a carefully designed Venus atmospheric descent probe of suitably small size could perhaps make it down the surface intact, and perhaps survive just long enough to send up a color picture of what things look like on the surface of Venus. And it could have a little Indian flag painted/engraved on the side, for Indians to crow about.

My guess is that the main spacecraft is likely to be a small orbiter borrowing some of its technology from RISAT-1, India's Radar Imaging Satellite. However, I don't see why a maiden Venus mission has to purely be restricted to an orbiter mission, when GSLV-Mk2/Mk3 allow significantly more margin for the payload mass envelope of the spacecraft than was previously possible, and given the time margin available. As Abdul Kalam himself said when proposing MIP - if you're going to take the trouble to go all that way, then you might as well go to the surface too.

There should be an atmospheric descent probe - the public will love it, the media and politicians will love it - and yes, even the scientific community might get something out of it as well.

Offline hop

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #30 on: 04/22/2017 07:33 AM »
But a carefully designed Venus atmospheric descent probe of suitably small size could perhaps make it down the surface intact, and perhaps survive just long enough to send up a color picture of what things look like on the surface of Venus.
Anything that has any chance of surviving to the surface of Venus isn't going to be a cheap little add-on. The "small" Pioneer Venus probes were ~90 kg each.

Even if you drop the requirement of surviving to the surface, the minimum requirements of a successful entry probe are far beyond something like MIP.


Online sanman

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #31 on: 04/22/2017 11:08 AM »
Anything that has any chance of surviving to the surface of Venus isn't going to be a cheap little add-on. The "small" Pioneer Venus probes were ~90 kg each.

Even if you drop the requirement of surviving to the surface, the minimum requirements of a successful entry probe are far beyond something like MIP.

Gee, I was imagining some compact high-strength canister suspended beneath a ballute.
But I guess the power to cool electronics for long enough is the main problem.
How much time would a descent to the surface approximately take, anyway?

Well, maybe instead of going all the way down, you could have something that floats down to a decent altitude of tolerable temperature and pressure, to study the atmosphere. Maybe it could even be solar-powered. Various people have commented about how "Earth-like" the atmosphere of Venus is at ~50km up, so it might be an interesting environment to study - maybe even send pictures back from. I wonder what a sunrise would look like from Venus at that altitude?

The mass envelope they gave for the spacecraft was ~175kg, but I'm assuming that was with GSLV-Mk2's lift capability. I wonder what kind of mass envelope would be possible with GSLV-Mk3?
« Last Edit: 04/22/2017 11:14 AM by sanman »

Offline hop

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #32 on: 04/22/2017 09:33 PM »
Gee, I was imagining some compact high-strength canister suspended beneath a ballute.
The Pioneer Venus small probes didn't use a parachute at all.
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How much time would a descent to the surface approximately take, anyway?
Roughly an hour from entry to impact for Pioneer Venus. A good overview can be found in http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/2004ESASP.544...37B

Note the small probes had ~5 kg of payload, and their data return was < 100 bits per second.  Modern electronics and batteries might let you do it in a slightly smaller package, but it wouldn't fundamentally change the picture.

Another important thing to realize is that the presence of a probe has significant impacts on the overall mission design. The probe needs to be delivered on an entry trajectory, and if you want much data, the orbiter also needs to carry relay equipment and be in a position to relay.

This is all a bit OT since there is no indication ISRO is considering anything beyond an orbiter. The main point is that you can do something like MIP with ~cubesat effort, but the minimum requirements for an atmospheric entry probe are far higher.
« Last Edit: 04/23/2017 12:05 AM by hop »

Offline worldtimedate

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #33 on: 04/22/2017 11:41 PM »
Personally, I think that it would be worthwhile to have an additional extra mini-probe that would detach from the main orbiter spacecraft, to descend into the atmosphere of Venus. Various forum people have commented that aerocapture should be especially doable for Venus, given its conveniently thicker atmosphere relative to its gravitation. A detachable mini-probe that descends into Venus' atmosphere would be sort of counterpart or successor to the Moon Impact Probe on the Chandrayaan-1 mission.

However, I don't see why a maiden Venus mission has to purely be restricted to an orbiter mission, when GSLV-Mk2/Mk3 allow significantly more margin for the payload mass envelope of the spacecraft than was previously possible, and given the time margin available.

With due respect to PSLV's streak of unsullied success, for any interplanetary mission, PSLV should NOT be used anymore, because it would not be able to carry more payload. Henceforth, ISRO should consider using GSLV MK-II which is shaping up as a next workhorse for ISRO after three consecutive successful launches with indigenous cryogenic engine. Ultimately LVM3 that would have capability to launch heavier payload for interplanetary mission, should be the ultimate choice.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]

Offline vyoma

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #34 on: 04/25/2017 05:53 AM »
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/venus-mission-isro-invites-proposals-for-space-experiments/articleshow/58336243.cms

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According to Isro, the payload capability of the Venus-bound satellite is expected to be 175 kg with 500W of power. The orbit will be 500 X 60,000km around Venus, which will gradually reduce over several months.

The focus of the mission will be atmospheric and surface studies, Sun-Venus interaction, biology experiments and technology demonstration. An Isro official told TOI that though it is an approved mission, the date of the launch is yet to be firmed up. The Indian mission to Venus+ has been listed as part of the department of space's demand for grants.

Online sanman

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Re: India Planning Mission to Venus
« Reply #35 on: 04/25/2017 02:44 PM »
The orbit will be 500 X 60,000km around Venus, which will gradually reduce over several months.

Just regarding this - is there any such thing as "reverse Oberth maneuver"? I realize Oberth Effect is exploited when raising orbits, but is it also common to do it for shrinking orbits, like when sending spacecraft to other planets, etc?

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