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Testing noise becomes rather more of an issue.
A site that will put up with occasional booms and launches once every month or two may have a dramatically different view when you want to launch twice a day for a month.

Exactly. This issue probably mandate an off-shore launch/landing platform, as we saw in the P2P video, from the very beginning.

The Cape area use to see a shuttle launch every 1-2 months.

I fully admit I may be wrong, but given the land area and clearance required, and industry and work force infrastructure only Florida makes sense and it should be more affordable.

BFR testing may have some limited exceptions. 

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wonder if they'll put a crane at the top of the FSS once they lay the support structure down?
....

I thought SX is putting some sort crew access arm on top of the FSS.
4
One of the various articles on this subject mentioned 22 million in contracts over several years. That's peanuts in the aerospace world.
5
The green seems to be smaller conduits.  Perhaps they could be for data or low voltage/control wiring. 

The blue looks like large diameter conduits for electrical copper.
For a solar array, I believe the low voltage DC wires are larger, i.e. higher amperage. Also I imagine there would be more low voltage DC wires than high voltage AC wires.

They could be using micro-inverters, but with the potential for hurricanes and flooding, I'm guessing traditional inverters located on the concrete slabs.

Agreed, located on concrete slabs and inside an elevated waterproof building.

Dam I love and miss construction.
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In-Space Hardware Section / Re: Interesting Bigelow government contracts
« Last post by Lar on Today at 02:49 PM »
... if it's a thing worth doing...
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wonder if they'll put a crane at the top of the FSS once they lay the support structure down? It sure feels like they are very close to being able to lay it down... just one layer left.


Too bad they don't have a webcam up pointed at it.  It may stay in place until the other side of the RSS is stripped and has it's weight reduced.  They can lower pieces down by supporting them from the structure itself.  I've worked with steel workers doing demolition and it's amazing watching their creativity and innovation.

I think their pace is going to quicken.

We'll know soon.
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2 things I noticed:  First, the first stage flip after staging was extremely fast, making for an efficiently timed boostback burn.
Noticed that one too, and went back to find comparison. Side-by-side with NROL-76: http://youtubedoubler.com/mqCH

[edit for shorter URL]

Super quick turn and burn.  Seems SpaceX is getting the timing refined. 

It will be interesting to see how fast the FH side boosters can do the boost back burn since they peel off the side versus axial separation.
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wonder if they'll put a crane at the top of the FSS once they lay the support structure down? It sure feels like they are very close to being able to lay it down... just one layer left.
10

For a solar array, I believe the low voltage DC wires are larger, i.e. higher amperage. Also I imagine there would be more low voltage DC wires than high voltage AC wires.

They could be using micro-inverters, but with the potential for hurricanes and flooding, I'm guessing traditional inverters located on the concrete slabs.
It will probably be high voltage DC. I'm mostly wild guessing 6 arrays per rack, which would be 216 volts if they were in series. I wouldn't be surprised if they went to the 400 volt range for DC, since that would keep wiring size down and be the same range the Model S uses. (Not sure what the model 3 is) It looks like the CS6U can handle up to 1500 volts to ground.
 The details of how or if they're tying into the grid should be interesting. With a transfer switch just west of the STARGATE building they could possibly take over the whole grid east of there with public juice for backup or times you don't see the sun for a week.
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