Author Topic: Expedition 53 Thread  (Read 28593 times)

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #160 on: 11/24/2017 02:54 PM »
NASA Astronaut Randy "Komrade" Bresnik  Page Liked · 6 hrs ·
 
Happy Thanksgiving! – Our @Space_Station feast included a candlelit dinner, lobster and freshly harvested lettuce among other things…
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #161 on: 11/27/2017 01:57 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/21/2017
 

Sarcolab-3:  With USOS operator assistance, a Russian subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and restraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol.  The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s leg. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #13 Deploy: Following yesterday’s successful deployment of silos 1-(ASTERIA), 3-(EcAMSAT), and 5-(RBLE); today the last two silos #7 (TechEdSat) and #8 (OSIRIS-3U) were deployed. JAXA ground teams commanded the deployment of the NRCSD #13 deployers while the crew recorded HD video and took still photos of the satellite deployment.  Due to the configuration of single- and double-wide deployers, NRCSD #13 has a total five deployers (slots 1, 3, 5, 7, and 8).  There are no deployers for slots 2, 4, and 6. Deployers 1-(ASTERIA), 3-(EcAMSAT), and 5-(RBLE) each contain a single 6U CubeSat (CS1).  Deployers 7-(TechEdSat) and 8-(OSIRIS-3U) each contain one 3U CubeSat (CS1) and a spacer.

Advanced Nano Step Specimen Cell 1 Removal: After successfully completing the 35-day Advanced Nano Step experiment run last week, today the Specimen Cell was removed from the Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF) and stowed until its return on SpX-13. This experiment investigates the relationship between impurity incorporation mechanisms and the quality of obtained protein crystals should be clarified for the progress to an “advanced” stage of the space utilization for structure-based drug design. In this mission, we observe the protein crystal growth surfaces of glucose isomerase crystals in space in the presence of various impurities with the use of a Michelson interferometer. In addition, we also clarify the crystal surface morphology on the molecular step level by using the laser confocal microscope. We evaluate the crystal quality of the returned crystals.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew setup and configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained the Light Meter readings before downloading the data and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state LEDs with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Zero Boil-Off Tank Particle Injection: The crew injected Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) particles into the test section for an imaging test. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Bigelow Expandable Aerospace Module (BEAM) Outfitting:  This week, the crew is outfitting BEAM to make room for future stowage operations inside BEAM.  Earlier today the crew re ingressed BEAM and converted BEAM Distributed Impact Detection System (DIDS) and Wireless Temperature System (WTS) sensor systems from wireless to a wired configuration.  They then extended the IMV ducts, installed stowage nets and retrieved six radiation area monitors and stowed them in the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) resupply stowage rack.  Before egressing the BEAM the crew installed stowage enclosure bags that will be used in the future for generic ISS stowage.

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Exam:  Routine OCT Exams were scheduled today for ISS CDR, FE-6 and FE-1.  Due to the incorrect baseline files being onboard FE-1 OCT Exam will have to be rescheduled for a future date.   

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #162 on: 11/27/2017 01:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/22/2017
 

Sarcolab-3:  This morning with Russian operator assistance, a USOS subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and restraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol.  The operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s leg. Today’s activities conclude the 3-day ankle protocol that began on GMT 324. The crew will begin knee protocol operations later this afternoon, including setup and fit check in preparation for data collection operations tomorrow. The Sarcolab-3 data will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  The crew set up cameras in Node 3 to capture video from multiple views of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and MED-2 hardware, applied body markers, performed exercises and transferred the video for downlink.  The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

TangoLab-1 Transfer to Cygnus (OA-8):  The crew removed TangoLab-1 from EXPRESS Rack 4, and transferred the facility to Cygnus for a short demonstration of TangoLab-1 operations in Cygnus. This is being performed as a proof of the “extended lab” concept, wherein visiting vehicles can be used as an extension of the ISS laboratory volume while attached.  TangoLab-1 is a reconfigurable general research facility designed for microgravity research and development and pilot manufacturing aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-5 Transfer: Following 8 days of incubation, today the crew removed the STaARS BioScience-5 Nexus Lab from the STaARS-1 experiment facility and inserted it into a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER). STaARS BioScience-5 studies how Staphylococcus aureus loses its harmful properties and changes color in microgravity. Automated culturing equipment grows S. aureus before delivering cultures to an observation chamber for data collection at predetermined time points. To understand the growth rates and morphology of the bacterium for an extended growth period, a microscope and spectrophotometer are both used.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 118 FMS session where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

N1 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assembly (CPA) Modification:  Earlier today, the crew modified the N1 nadir Controller Panel Assembly (CPA) grounding straps with longer ones in an effort to allow the CPA to be folded out of the hatchway instead of having to be removed for each vehicle that docks to this port. 

Fundoscope Eye Exam:  FE-6 completed a routine fundoscope exam today.  Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crew health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment. 

Node 2 Overhead Port Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) Diffuser Cleaning: Today the crew cleaned the overhead port diffusers and inspected internal ducting for additional Foreign Object Debris (FOD) buildup. The crew has noted that the overhead diffusers look dusty, which is consistent with IMV flow measurements showing less airflow.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #163 on: 11/27/2017 01:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2017
 

Cygnus Cargo Operations:  The crew completed 12 hours and 45 minutes of Cygnus cargo operations today, at this time the crew has completed 84% of the cargo operations for this Cygnus mission.  Ground specialist estimate the crew will require approximately 8 hours to complete the remaining cargo operations. 

Sarcolab-3: After successfully completing three days of the ankle protocol, today a USOS and Russian subject completed the first day of the knee protocol for Sarcolab-3, by ingressing into the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installing the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and conducting the knee exercises. The final knee protocol activity will be completed next week. The Sarcolab-3 data will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Veg-03 Harvest and Stow: The crew performed the final harvest of the 4th Veg-03 experiment run from the Veggie plant growth facility. The plant samples, swabs, and plant pillows were inserted into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) after the plants were harvested and the swab samples were collected, The Veggie equipment was then cleaned and stowed. Veg-03 contains six plant grow out and harvests sessions. The 4th, 5th, and 6th sessions are the first of their kind because they contain a mixed harvest of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna, which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crewmembers to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility.

NanoRacks Vuze (One Strange Rock) Camera Mounted Operations: The crew deployed the NanoRack Vuze camera to record 3-Dementional 360-degree videos inside of the ISS. The mounted camera will capture a day in a life style footage as the crew goes about their nominal tasks throughout the ISS. National Geographic Channel–Virtual Reality Educational Video for Television Series–“One Strange Rock” (One Strange Rock Virtual Reality) is a 10-part series that transports a virtual reality camera to the ISS for recording of a National Geographic special on the Earth as a natural life-support system. Crew aboard the ISS record a series of virtual reality pieces for incorporation into a larger documentary about natural history and the solar system. Each episode features a different crewmember and addresses different topics using next generation virtual reality technology to raise awareness about the Earth system and the space program.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew captured images and footage of the Nile Delta at night. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Fundoscope Eye Exam:  ISS and FE-4 completed routine fundoscope exams today.  Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crewmembers eye health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

Online centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #164 on: 11/28/2017 02:09 PM »
Rigt now, Joe Acaba and Alexander Misurkin, working on SPHERES experiment in Destiny lab...
« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 03:37 PM by centaurinasa »

Online centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #165 on: 11/28/2017 04:05 PM »
A great view of Dextre ...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #166 on: 11/29/2017 06:12 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/27/2017
 

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Over the weekend, the crew captured images and video footage of the Australian Desert, Italy at night, Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, and Ireland to Moscow at night. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, displaying Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Operations: After successfully deploying all five of the NRCSD#13 silos last week, today the CubeSat deployer was removed from the Multipurpose Experiment Platform (MPEP).  The crew initiated the JEM A/L pressurization and performed a leak check before opening the JEMAL inner hatch and extending the slide table to the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Module (JPM) side to remove the deployer from the MPEP.  The MPEP was then be removed from the side table before the slide table was retracted from the JPM and the inner hatch was closed.

Sarcolab-3: Today a USOS subject, with Russian operator assistance, conducted the final knee protocol for Sarcolab-3, by ingressing into the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installing the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and conducting the knee exercises. Today’s activity concludes the Sarcolab-3 session that began last week on GMT 324. The Sarcolab-3 data will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Probiotics Operations: Today a crewmember initiated the third of four sampling phases for the JAXA Probiotic investigation by collecting fecal samples and immediately stowing the samples into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). This sampling phase includes fecal and saliva sample collections and a questionnaire. The saliva sample collection and questionnaire will be conducted on GMT 334. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of probiotics on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts under closed microgravity environment. This investigation studies the effects of beneficial bacteria (Probiotics) to improve crew members’ intestinal microbiota as well as their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Personal Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Monitor Installations: Using an iPad and readings from a Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) sample port, the crew performed a single point calibration of the Personal CO2 monitors. The Personal CO2 Monitor demonstrates a system capable of unobtrusively collecting and downlinking individual crewmembers’ CO2 exposure for weeks to months. This investigation evaluates wearability principles in microgravity and demonstrates Modular Wearable Architecture Base Board, allowing rapid certification of future wearable devices.

Zero Boil-Off Tank Particle Injection: The crew injected Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) particles into the test section for an imaging test. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Sabatier removal preparation:  In preparation for the upcoming removal, return, and refurbishment of the Sabatier hardware, the crew performed velocicalc (airflow) measurements inside OGS, and reviewed procedures both on their own and via a crew conference with specialists on the ground.  Sabatier is planned to be returned to the ground on SpaceX-13 in January.

Cygnus cargo ops and departure OBT:  Today the crew continued cargo operations and unberth/release on board training in preparation for the upcoming departure of OA-8.

Offline bolun

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #167 on: 11/29/2017 03:07 PM »
Record man

As the International Space Station circles Earth at an altitude of only 400 km, basic radio technology can be used to communicate with it – as long as it flies within sight of the receiver on the ground.

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station group organises regular contacts with astronauts in space and schoolchildren. Here, ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli was talking to   a school in Villasanta, Italy. Each overhead path allows enough time to answer around 18 questions from schoolchildren.

Paolo is on his third mission in space, called Vita, and has set records for amateur radio. During Vita he reclaimed his title of astronaut with the most school contacts, and also set a record for video over amateur radio – a new addition to the Station in 2014.

Paolo’s mission is coming to an end, with the landing date set for 14 December at 08:36 GMT (09:36 CET) together with Russian commander Sergei Ryazansky and NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik in their Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft.

If you have the equipment at home, you can try to contact an astronaut on the Station as it passes within range. Paolo’s call sign is IZ0JPA but all astronauts are trained on the equipment and have their own call sign. Hail them and you might get lucky as they pass by – if they have a minute to spare between working on experiments and maintaining the Space Station.

For more information and to apply for a school session to talk to an astronaut, go to the ARISS website here: http://www.ariss-eu.org/

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/11/Record_man

Image credit: ESA/NASA

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #168 on: 11/29/2017 03:09 PM »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/24388/
Planned reboost was done.
Google translation
Quote
In accordance with the program of the International Space Station (ISS) flight, the planned correction of the ISS orbit was conducted on November 29, 2017. To perform the maneuver at 18:50 Moscow time, the propulsion unit of the Progress-MS-06 cargo vehicle, docked to the International Space Station, was switched on. The operating time of the propulsion system was 183.6 seconds. As a result, the station received a speed increment of 0.36 m / s.
According to the data of the ballistic-navigation support service of the Flight Control Center (MCC), the calculated orbit parameters of the ISS after the maneuver were:

• The minimum height above the Earth's surface is 402.8 km,
• the maximum height above the Earth's surface is 422.7 km,
• the circulation period is 92.60 minutes,
• inclination of the orbit - 51.625 degrees.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #169 on: 11/30/2017 07:32 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/28/2017
 

Sabatier Removal for Return:  In preparation for returning Sabatier, today the crew completed the first of two days of activities by removing the Sabatier unit from the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) Rack.  They also completed some near term preventive maintenance activities by performing an H2 Sensor Removal and Replacement (R&R) and Avionics Air Assembly (AAA) cleaning.  During Sabatier removal, the crew removed the Compressor, Main Controller, and Motor Controller.  These components will remain on orbit and stowed inside the OGS Rack.  Tomorrow the crew is scheduled to return the OGS Rack Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) flow to the pre-Sabatier configuration and functionality.  The Sabatier unit will be returned on SpaceX-13 in January for investigation.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections:  A 52S crewmember conducted fecal sample collections for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  During today’s Rodent Habitat installation, the crew noticed a leak on the outside of the first two habitats. After inspecting and later temporarily stowing the first two habitats until the ground teams confirm the identity of the substance, the crew installed the third and fourth habitats.  The power and data cables were configured into the specified rack locations and ground teams were able to successfully conduct software checkouts on the third and fourth habitats.  A forward plan is in work to clean and install the first two habitats that will support the upcoming RR-6 investigation arriving on SpaceX-13. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions. Two groups of 20 mice will live aboard the ISS in the rodent habitat for durations of one and two months. The first group of treated and controlled mice will return to Earth live after approximately 30 days. The second group of animals will remain on the ISS for approximately 60 days. In both cases, animals are euthanized humanely, and tissue samples are harvested for subsequent study and comparison with Earth-based control groups.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics (ZR):   Today the crew set up the SPHERES work area, then activated and checked out the hardware and the EXPRESS laptop computer before running a unit test for the SPHERES ZR competition that is scheduled to be performed in January 2018.  The SPHERES Zero Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Sarcolab-3 De-configure and Stow:  After successfully completing the final Sarcolab-3 session that began on GMT 324 and ended yesterday, today the crew disconnected and stowed the Electromyography (EPM), Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) and Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES). The crew verified and downlinked the data before removing and stowing the MARES-EPM hard disk from EPM laptop. The Sarcolab-3 data will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

NanoRacks Platform-1 Hardware Upgrade:  The NanoRack Platform-1 locker was replaced with an upgraded unit.  The NanoRack Platform is a multipurpose research facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). NanoRack Platforms support NanoRacks Modules in the CubeSat form factor by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity. NanoRacks Platform-1 is one of three Platforms and is used for modules not needing power.

Cygnus cargo ops and departure OBT:  Today the crew continued cargo operations in preparation for the upcoming departure of OA-8.

Robotic Operations:  Yesterday and overnight, the Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) as required to stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2). They then walked the SSRMS off MBS PDGF4 onto Node 2 and started the data gathering required to characterize the SSRMS Latching End Effector A (LEE-A) Force-Moment Sensor (FMS). First they performed a Thermal Drift Filter Checkout and a Wrist Roll (WR) Compensation Checkout. Next they unstowed the SPDM from MBS PDGF2 and repeated the Thermal Drift Filter and WR Compensation Checkouts. The Robotic Ground Controllers then maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM as required to position SPDM Arm1 to grasp the MBS Starboard H-Fixture in order to be able to perform the SSRMS LEE-A FMS Fine Characterization. Two attempts were made to grasp this fixture but in both attempts Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM1) safed before achieving the “load secure” position. The operation was terminated and the SPDM was maneuvered to a park position. Further troubleshooting will be attempted this evening.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #170 on: 12/02/2017 08:28 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/29/2017
 

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  During the installation of four Rodent Habitats yesterday, the crew noticed a leak on the outside of the first two habitats. The crew successfully installed the third and fourth habitats, but were instructed to temporarily stow the first two habitats until ground teams could develop a forward plan.  Earlier today, the crew cleaned the contamination from the outside of the habitats and further inspected the inside of both habitats.  After confirming that no contamination was inside of the affected habitats, the habitats were deemed safe and successfully installed in the EXPRESS Rack by the crew.  All four habitats will be used to support the upcoming RR-6 investigation arriving on SpaceX-13.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Marrow, and Repository): A 51S crewmember conducted his return minus 15 day (R-15) breath and ambient air, blood, and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile, Marrow, and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
•Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a crewmember instrumented himself with Thermolab Double Sensors and mounted the Thermolab Unit to his belt, and began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: The crew set up and activated the JEM Camera Robot before assisting ground teams with the 5th flight checkout activity. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

Zero Boil-Off Tank Particle Injection: The crew injected Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) particles into the test section for an imaging test. Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew removed and replaced a CIR manifold #2 bottle and set the CIR valve timers on the front of the optics bench to limit the amount of fuel and oxygen in the CIR Combustion Chamber. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

NanoRacks Vuze (One Strange Rock) Camera Handheld Operations in the Cupola: The crew used the NanoRack Vuze camera to record 3-Dimensional 360-degree videos inside of the ISS.  The crew used the handheld camera in the Cupola to capture long corridor footage to give the viewer a 3D perspective of floating through the ISS. National Geographic Channel–Virtual Reality Educational Video for Television Series–“One Strange Rock” (One Strange Rock Virtual Reality) is a 10-part series that transports a virtual reality camera to the ISS for recording of a National Geographic special on the Earth as a natural life-support system. Crew aboard the ISS record a series of virtual reality pieces for incorporation into a larger documentary about natural history and the solar system. Each episode features a different crewmember and addresses different topics using next generation virtual reality technology to raise awareness about the Earth system and the space program.

Meteor Grating Configuration and Hard Drive Exchange: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive and changed diffraction gratings in the Meteor camera located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) payload volume. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers have been identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Sabatier Removal for Return:  Today, the crew returned the OGS Rack Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) flow to the pre-Sabatier configuration and functionality.  The Sabatier unit will be returned on SpaceX-13 in January for refurbishment.

Dragon Robotics On-Board Trainer (RoBOT): In preparation for SpX-13 berthing currently scheduled for December 10th, the crew completed Robotics training consisting of a simulated 30 meter approach, two Capture Point hold runs and 2-meter runs.

67P Reboost:  Today, ground controllers commanded a reboost of the ISS using engines on 67Progress.  This was a nominally planned reboost and configured the station’s orbit for SpaceX-13 arrival and the 51S/53S crew rotation.

Robotics operations:  Last night, ground controllers performed steps to check out the Force Moment Sensor (FMS) on Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).  Due to the previous night’s anomaly, the grasping task was not attempted, but all other tasks were completed successfully.

Cygnus cargo operations:  The crew has continued cargo operations to fill the OA-8 Cygnus capsule with disposal cargo.  A total of 72 hours 15 minutes have been spent on cargo operations so far this mission.  It is estimated that slightly over one hour of cargo operations remain.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #171 on: 12/02/2017 08:28 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/30/2017
 

Probiotics Operations: Today a crewmember conducted the second half of the third sampling phase for the JAXA Probiotic investigation that began on GMT 331 with fecal sample collections. Today’s activities included saliva sample collections and a questionnaire. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of probiotics on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts under closed microgravity environment This investigation studies the effects of beneficial bacteria (Probiotics) to improve crew members’ intestinal microbiota as well as their immune function on long-duration space missions.

TangoLab-1 Transfer from Cygnus (OA-8):  After completing the short demonstration of TangoLab-1 operations in Cygnus that began on GMT 326 last week, today the crew powered down and removed TangoLab-1 from Cygnus and returned the facility back to EXPRESS Rack 4. The facility will be powered back up in ER4 and returned to its nominal capability. TangoLab-1 is a reconfigurable general research facility designed for microgravity research and development and pilot manufacturing aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Plant Habitat Sound Level Meter (SLM) Measurements: The crew performed ten Plant Habitat acoustic measurement sets with varying Environmental Control System (ECS) fan speeds between each measurement set. The fan speeds were controlled via ground command. The data from the measurements will be used to assess the environmental factors when the Plant Habitat facility is used in the JEM. The Advanced Plant Habitat Facility (Plant Habitat) is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

NeuroMapping: Today two 52S crewmembers set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed their Flight Day 90 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile and Repository): A 51S crewmember conducted his return minus 15 Day (R-15) blood, and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew captured images and video footage of the Namib Desert, the Mediterranean at Night, Fishing Boats, along the Gulf of Thailand, and Southern Tip of India.   The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Dragon OBT:  In preparation for the upcoming arrival of SpaceX-13 Dragon, the crew performed training of the offset grapple case for Dragon capture.  The crew performed a series of onboard training (OBT) sessions to maintain proficiency prior to a vehicle arrival.

Cygnus cargo operations:  Disposal cargo loading operations continued on the OA-8 Cygnus vehicle.  Today, the crew removed TangoLab-1, and loaded disposal cargo on the vehicle.  Cargo loading will continue until hatch closure, which is planned for Tuesday, December 5th.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #172 on: 12/03/2017 02:22 PM »
Pizza in Space


It looks like the crew has moved the Galley tabel to the oposite side of Node 1. (Now it's mounted against the ZSR at Node1 S4)
I've also posted pictures from Nasa with M01 backs instaled inside BEAM for stowage. Nice simplistic solution.
« Last Edit: 12/03/2017 02:26 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #173 on: 12/05/2017 08:01 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/01/2017
 

Circadian Rhythms: A 52S crewmember removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36-hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Wednesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember conducted saliva sample collections for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were then placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: The crew performed the 5th JEM Camera Robot checkout activity using a sponge ball. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

NanoRacks-DreamUp Xtronaut Microbe (DreamXM) Operations: Today the crew completed the last day of NanoRacks DreamXM operations by taking the final set of photos to track the progression of the experiment. NanoRacks DreamXM was initiated two weeks ago on GMT 320, when the crew used cotton swabs to sample locations and inoculate several petri dishes.  Photos were taken of each Petri Dish as a baseline data point. Kits containing nearly identical materials were provided to students to perform a duplicate ground experiment. NanoRacks(DreamXM) teaches students the different microbial growths from a home-school setting and those in microgravity using near-identical flight kits flown and operated in the International Space Station (ISS). With access to an online portal, students swab away, paralleling the procedures of crewmembers and comparing results with online videos and datasets. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Zero Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Removal and Stow: After successfully completing a ten-week experiment run, today the crew removed the ZBOT hardware from the MSG work volume.  Rocket fuel, spacecraft heating and cooling systems, and sensitive scientific instruments rely on very cold cryogenic fluids. Heat from the environment around cryogenic tanks can cause their pressures to rise, which requires dumping or “boiling off” fluid to release the excess pressure, or actively cooling the tanks in some way. ZBOT uses an experimental fluid to test active heat removal and forced jet mixing as alternative means for controlling tank pressure for volatile fluids.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval:  Today a USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment, and handed them to a Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: The crew captured images and footage of Japan and the India-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Sabatier Return Preparation:  The crew installed the Sabatier Assembly into Flight Support Equipment (FSE), and then packed it in specially cut foam for return and refurbishment.  Sabatier is planned for return to the ground on SpaceX-13 in January.

Dragon Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT) Self Study:  In preparation for SpX-13 capture and berthing, the crew completed a self-study session on the ROBoT. They practiced malfunction responses, nominal rate approaches, and 2-meter approaches.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN)-1 Status – Early Thursday morning, MERLIN-1 lost heath and status and Ethernet communication. The MERLIN unit was in a continuous reboot cycle.  The MERLIN coolers stayed on during the duration of the anomaly. Later in the day, MERLIN-1 was recovered nominally following a power cycle.  MERLIN-1 is located in the NODE1 Galley Rack and is utilized for food refrigeration, not for science.

Permanent Multi-Purpose Module (PMM) General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) 7 Anomaly –

Yesterday the PMM Power Distribution Box (PDB) Remote Power Controller (RPC) 8 showed a steady increase in current from 0.23 amp to 0.39 amp. The crew reported the LHA was flickering with some noise. The RPC was preemptively commanded open. Historically, there have been similar signatures for GLAs in both MPLM and PMM; this signature indicates the imminent failure of the Light Housing Assembly (LHA). The LHA will be replaced with an on-orbit spare.

Online centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #174 on: 12/06/2017 01:04 AM »
"Checking the fit and function of our Sokol spacesuits in our Soyuz spacecraft means they are serious about us coming home 14 December!"

https://twitter.com/AstroKomrade/status/938134376633663488

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #175 on: 12/06/2017 06:22 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/04/2017
 

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Over the weekend, the crew captured images and video footage of Japan, the Sahara Desert, the India-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau, Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, and Ireland to Moscow at night. Today the crew captured images of the Himalayas, facing northwest up the mountain range. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Eli Lilly-Lyophilization Sample Tray Installation: The crew set up the Lyophilization hardware this morning, removed the two frozen sample trays from the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and placed the samples into the sample chamber within the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for processing. Lyophilization in Microgravity (Eli Lilly-Lyophilization) examines freeze-drying processes in the microgravity environment aboard the ISS. Freeze-drying is used to preserve food and medication but may create layering or other textures in the presences of gravity. The samples will be returned to the Earth for comparison with control samples.

ISS Non-invasive Sample Investigation and results Transmission to ground with the Utmost easiness (In Situ):   The crew collected a saliva sample and processed it in the bio analyzer for the In Situ investigation.  Crewmembers are continuously monitored for health changes, and as part of these measurements, they have to take saliva samples that are stored and returned to Earth later. The In Situ bioanalysis is a portable device that can check crewmembers’ saliva on board, enabling direct real-time analysis. The device’s first uses are to monitor stress levels and appetites among crewmembers. Humans living in space experience dramatic changes to their health, from weakened bone and muscle to reduced appetites and increased stress levels. The device uses disposable cartridges that check for the presence of the stress hormone cortisol.  A miniature analytical device that can detect certain biomarkers using non-invasively collected samples would benefit health care workers on Earth, from emergency medical technicians on call, to small rural clinics in developing countries.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 132 FMS session, which is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Preparation for Return:  The crew swapped EMU 3008 and 3010 and then removed hardware from EMU 3010 in preparation for return on SpaceX-13.  The EMU arms and legs will remain on ISS for future activities.  After the hardware is removed, the crew installed Short EMU ancillary hardware and soft stow covers to prepare the SEMU for installation into the SEMU Launch Enclosure.

51S Cargo Pre-pack:  The crew gathered hardware and labelled it for return on 51S.  Some of the hardware that will be retrieved at the landing site for immediate return requires special labelling to help locate it in the Soyuz at landing.

Cygnus Release Preparations:  In support of the OA-8 Cygnus unberth planned for tomorrow and the release planned for Wednesday, the crew performed a refresher session on Cygnus release operations using Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT).  This procedure included three Cygnus runs and instructions for self-study.  Additionally, the crew activated the Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communications Unit (CUCU), checked out the CUCU Crew Command Panel (CCP), and then restowed the CCP.  Earlier this morning, ground controllers activated the Cygnus Prox system.

ORU Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM) Troubleshooting:  Last Monday, November 28th, during Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Force Moment Sensor (FMS) Fine characterization, OTCM1 failed on two attempts to grasp the H-Fixture on the Mobile Base System (MBS). This past Friday was able to grasp the EOTP H-fixture with no issues. The successful OTCM1 testing at a second H-fixture location confirms that the MBS H-fixture issue is an oversized H-fixture.  Out of spec components have been encountered on-orbit in the past and can be accommodated with an update to the payload file with increased tolerances.

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA): Early Sunday morning, Lab CDRA failed with the Fan Motor Controller (FMC) current and fan speed going to zero.  Node 3 CDRA was activated to minimize CO2 impacts. The failure signature indicates this is a recurrence of a previous failure on 1/29/16.  Lab CDRA was recovered with an FMC power-cycle. Node 3 CDRA was put in standby once the Lab CDRA was recovered.

Node 2 High Definition (HD) Encoder Firmware Update: On Friday, the firmware was updated on the Node 2 HD encoder. The load was successful and a checkout is in progress. This is a new version of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) firmware for the AVN443 HD Encoder. The purpose of the AVN443 HD Encoder firmware upgrade is to implement a timestamp function in the Encoder that does not exist in the current firmware. Ground teams will confirm the update is successful before attempting to load the remaining five HD encoders on ISS.

Online centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #176 on: 12/06/2017 01:26 PM »
ISS config. updated, after Cygnus OA-8 departure.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #177 on: 12/07/2017 09:50 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/05/2017


Cygnus unberth:  This morning, the crew egressed Cygnus.  They then configured the vestibule and prepared to depressurize the vestibule.  Ground teams identified EMI as the cause of the pressure probe anomaly and successfully depressurized the vestibule.  Later, the Cygnus vehicle was unberthed and positioned it for the GPS shadowing (“photobomb”) Developmental Test Objective (DTO).  Cygnus will be held in that position overnight and then repositioned for release tomorrow.  Cygnus arrived at the ISS on the 14th of November carrying supplies, and is now departing with hardware and trash for disposal.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Today the crew captured images of the Iberian peninsula. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Configuration for Cell Science Validation: The crew set up the Life Science Ancillary Hardware (LSAH) in the MSG today to prepare for the Cell Science Validation activities.  They installed the Decontamination System, Rear Standoff and Life Science filters. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. The new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will also be demonstrated.  The validation of the Bioculture System performance in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

51S Descent Drill:  51S crewmembers participated in onboard training to rehearse their upcoming descent and landing, planned for December 14th.

EHS SSK MAS analysis:  Today the crew analyzed microbial samples which were taken on GMT day 334 (November 30) and incubated until today.  This information gives medical personnel a gauge of microbial growth in the air and on surfaces of the ISS.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #178 on: 12/07/2017 12:59 PM »

Online centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #179 on: 12/07/2017 02:48 PM »
Some work on EMU today...


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